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Loveandmercy Loveandmercy is offline
 
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Child spits (third grader)
Old 07-29-2019, 05:38 AM
 
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HI All,
I have an incoming student with a history of spitting last year in second grade (at the teacher.) Have any of you had a student such as this poor boy and how did you handle the student? I believe we are seeing more severe emotional troubles in the our classrooms.
Thank you very much!


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What has been done in the past
Old 07-29-2019, 05:48 AM
 
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with this student? Has it been brought to the Child Study Team? I understand that preschoolers might do it, but by 3rd grade? There should be some strategies in place, with appropriate consequences.
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Spitter
Old 07-29-2019, 05:49 AM
 
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I would ask last year's teacher how he/she handled the spitting situation. What worked last year? What didnít?
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Old 07-29-2019, 06:03 AM
 
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I think a lot of the response would be based on his reason/function for the behavior (attention seeking, anger, etc). I agree with the other posters to check in with his previous teacher. I hope it works out well for you! Maybe he won't even use that behavior anymore.
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Be yourself
Old 07-29-2019, 06:15 AM
 
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Be kind. Find something to like in the student. Show the child you like them. Be fair. Be firm. Don't allow yourself to get into a power struggle.

I had a student that was diagnosed as high functioning on the autism scale. His academics were on target/high, but he got frustrated easily and wanted to complete tasks fast rather than correctly.

His second grade year he regularly tore up the classroom. The teacher (understandably) was frustrated and eventually refused to deal with him at all (not understandably) She ignored him, had him sit in a corner and waited for the SPED teacher to give him any instruction. This just exacerbated his behavior. He was pretty destructive.

I had him for third grade. I placed him in the group closest to my desk, with his desk closest to my reading/group table. I placed calm/non-button pushing students next to him. I was friendly and welcoming. I firmly corrected unacceptable behavior, but with the expectation that he could/would conform.

For example: Once he got angry and went and flung himself on the floor next to the coat racks. He wasn't making noise or tearing up things, so I ignored him. Of course, the other students were like: "Johnny's laying on the floor." So I just replied" Yes, Johnny is upset right now and he's learning to control his temper. When he has calmed down, he will return to his seat and get back to work." About 5 minutes later, he did just that.

He may just need a different, non-confrontational approach.


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Old 07-29-2019, 06:33 AM
 
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I would definitely need to know what has been done so far with the student and the parents. Is there a specific emotional problem ? Developmental problem?


Over the years I have done several approaches to random spitting from normally developing students:


calmly directed the child to the bucket,sponge and sink and directed the child to wash the spit off the concrete or carpet


calmly told the child to please go to the classroom sink to spit all he wants and I will let him know when he can return to his seat


students who purposely spit on another person were given immediate time out off of recess and walked around with me on yard duty as "right now I need to keep an eye on you and your friends to be sure this doesn't happen again."


Escalating the situation,no matter what it may be,is never a good idea. Stay calm.
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Old 07-29-2019, 11:23 AM
 
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Thank you !
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Old 07-29-2019, 03:25 PM
 
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Quote:
in the group closest to my desk, with his desk closest to my reading/group table. I placed calm/non-button pushing students next to him. I was friendly and welcoming. I firmly corrected unacceptable behavior, but with the expectation that he could/would conform.
Just want to say I second this approach. Let him know you have faith in him that you know he CAN follow the expectations.

Also I agree with Anna not to escalate. As crazy as it sounds, do not take this very offensive behavior personally.
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Spitting at the teacher is verydifferent than
Old 07-29-2019, 03:52 PM
 
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spitting on the floor. I do not think I'd want the spitter close to me though or close to other kids.
I have only known 1 spitter ( towards the teacher) at that age and it was years ago.
The kid was not in my class, but I saw the consequence that was used. I do not know if it was effective and if I even mentioned the consequence I am afraid people would scream "child abuse" on here. It was a special ed technique in the old days, and as I said, I am not sure if it was effective or not.
The teacher explained it to me, but I was not comfortable w/ it and let myself get docked 1 point on my evaluation because there were a few things like that I would not do when I had to supervise that girl at recess.
You are very right that we are seeing more and more emotionally troubled kids in our classrooms.
Some of these kids are put in regular classrooms when a better smaller environment would probably be better for the child and the rest of the kids. I know it seems like I am not compassionate as others, but I don't feel like it is right for the other 20 some kids to have someone who spits on them.
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