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I want to go home!
Old 04-01-2012, 05:26 AM
 
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How would you handle a kindergarten child who cries/bawls every morning missing her mother and wants to go home to the point she claims she is going to throw up if she doesn't get her way? She'll spit up huge size flam and spit on the floor calling that vomit. She only does this behavior in the morning right after separating from her mother and at lunch time for her mother puts a picture of herself in the child's lunch. She can carry on for a half hour each time and longer if she can find someone who will baby and cuddle her.

Curious of how everyone would handle this situation. .


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Old 04-01-2012, 05:37 AM
 
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I would let mom know exactly what is going on and ask her if someone else could bring her to school.
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Old 04-01-2012, 05:49 AM
 
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I would sit her in the corner, let her cry her eyes out, and ignore all of her behaviors everyday and go on about business.I would start charting the length of time she is crying each day and hopefully it would be less with each day. Instruct students to ignore her and give her absolutely no attention. Agree with Rhubarb to let mom know, and also ask her to not to put the picture in the box at lunch time. Maybe she could include a note about how proud of her she is that she is having a good day at school, etc. I'm really surprised that a K child is still doing this at this time of year. Has there been a traumatic event in her life in the past year?
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Old 04-01-2012, 05:50 AM
 
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should not be putting a picture in the lunchbox. Tell her to stop. I would be hard on her and not baby her at all. I had a girl like that this year in first and I had to be tough on the mom because mom wouldn't leave and would baby her. I would not feed into the behavior at all. I ignored her. Finally she stopped and her mother stopped and it's better!
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Old 04-01-2012, 05:55 AM
 
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It depends on what time of year it is! Did you start school in August/September and this is still happening? Or are you in another country and it's the beginning of the school year?

I had a little boy who actually did cry to the point of throwing up regularly. I offered him compassion and showed him that school is a safe and fun place. He eventually got past it.

When children are upset because they really are sad about missing home, I try to involve them in something really fun.

My own son (first grade) cries when I drop him off, but not if dh does. He doesn't carry on like that, but the moment of separation truly is difficult for him.

It sounds like maybe your situation is a little different.


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Old 04-01-2012, 06:19 AM
 
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To Mom, this is heartbreaking. Her child is unhappy. She thinks she's doing the best thing at dropoff and with the picture at lunch. When you approach her, make sure you frame it as making things easier and more comfortable for little Susie, and encouraging her independence rather than 'why don't you just do what the other parents do!' (which is what we ALL would want to say ! ).

I've had to do some very uncomfortable 'you are making your child upset' talks with parents this year (4, actually, 2 with the same parent).

1. Is mom walking her in, hanging up her coat, etc.? That's the first thing I'd target: "Mrs. Susie, Susie is still having a hard time transitioning in the morning, and I know that's bothering both of us because we hate to see her so upset. She's still crying for about 30 minutes, and also spitting on the floor to show she has thrown up so she can go home. I think it might help her build independence if we could come up with a fast drop-off routine so she's not so stuck thinking about the separation. Maybe you could bring her to the door, give her a quick hug, and then I could bring her into the classroom? That way it's fast for her so she can move on to thinking about being at school." Keep pushing 'build independence' and the child not getting 'stuck' on missing mom. DO NOT say it's because it's hard for you to manage her crying for 30 minutes and spitting--That sounds to mom like you don't care about her kid. I like the idea of someone else bringing her to school--Is there a sibling who could walk her down the hall? That solved it with one of my little guys, and it makes both siblings feel good.

2. Sneak the picture out of her lunchbox! Kidding Approach it the same way with mom: "The other time Susie gets very upset is at lunch when she sees the picture in her lunchbox. I know you put it in there to remind her of you and to comfort her. Maybe instead you could read this book together (hand her "The Kissing Hand")? It's about a raccoon with separation anxiety. I've had success before (even if you haven't!) with a parent putting on lipstick and making a kiss mark on a piece of paper, and then putting that in the backpack or lunchbox. Maybe a reminder of you that's not a picture would work better, so she doesn't get quite so upset but she still has a reminder that you love her." Again, no mention of the frustration of dealing with the tantrum, or the babying that prolongs it. Focus on the mom feeling good about her kid being comfortable and building independence. And if the kiss paper makes her as upset, then you revisit the conversation centering around removing it altogether to see if that helps make her day more comfortable and less upsetting.

3. I let ALL support staff know which children are attention-criers, and ask them nicely NOT to play into it. They're trying to help and they don't realize what that's doing. I also give gentle, "Hi Ms. Smith! We're ignoring again today--Hoping to shorten this one to 5 minutes instead of 10!" with a big smile, so that person feels like they're helping me out when they approach to comfort Susie.

4. Depending on the child, I'll either give a hug and say, "I see you miss mom! Let's get started because the faster you get your work done, the faster you go home!" and then completely ignore the tears. To the table, work out, pencil in hand, cheerful reminders, "Susie, you wrote your name! Keep going!" or "Susie, you ate your grapes! Try a bite of sandwich!" as if she's not crying at all. If she's too worked up for that, I pull the, "Your crying is making it too hard for us to hear/eat. When you're ready to act like a kindergartener, you can join us. Don't wait for me to tell you. As soon as you're ready, you can just get up and come over." and then sit her and completely ignore the crying. If she stops and doesn't get up, then I'll say, "Susie, you look ready. Come on over!" but that's the first time I'll acknowledge--When she's done.

Good luck! That's a very frustrating situation, and hard to address with the parent. Let us know what you decide to do!
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Old 04-01-2012, 07:09 AM
 
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Bless you all for your responses! I've been torn on this a little throughout the year.

This girl had been in my classroom since the first day in August. I had offered compassion and engaged her in many fun activities at the beginning. Towards the middle of November, I still offered compassion - but decided "Tough Love" was needed.

I had spoken to mother several times during the first couple months.

I had asked the mother to stop walking her daughter to the classroom with her toddler brother every morning and start dropping her off at the front door. The "Goodbyes" were getting longer every day in the classroom. And I also asked the mother to stop putting the family photo in the lunch box.

The mother refused to do both suggestions that I gave her.

It took the principal and the guidance counselor to get the mother to stop walking her daughter to the classroom every day by the end of November. During this conversation with the principal, the mother apparently asked the principal if her daughter could be placed in another classroom for I was "insensitive" to her daughter's needs (because I refused to respond and react to her bawling, "I want attention," type behavior.) She told the principal that I ignored her daughter when she was bawling and wanting to go home. But I did respond to her when she was calm and had control of herself, I did give her lots of positive attention then. The mother told the principal that I was "stubborn."

The principal told the mother that moving the child to another classroom under these circumstances would NOT be an option.

After that, the mother complained that child would NOT get ready at home to go to school, it was a battle every day, and her daughter wouldn't eat breakfast at home and mother claimed she would vomit in the car on the way to school. The mother felt the child needed to eat breakfast at school - "she just had to eat something" - and mother attempted to walk her daughter to the lunchroom at school for breakfast with toddler brother.

Basically it was the same scene but instead of in the classroom we have the crying/bawling in the lunch room where everyone besides just her classmates would see how she acted. The mother would make promises with her daughter that if she ate, she'd carry her school bag to the classroom. Really? For another crying/bawling scene in the classroom?? NOT! I had to get principal involved again because the scene of separation in the lunch room was even worse than before in the classroom. Principal witness the behavior and had the guidance counsel speak with the mother again.

We started seeing immediate success with our new "tough love" plan. Mother would drop her off at the front door and the child would walk to the lunchroom for breakfast or to the lunchroom on her own. There would be a few tears at the school entrance the first week, but by the end of the second week, the girl proudly walked to the classroom on her own without tears.

We still saw tears at lunch time for the family photo still was packed with her lunch. If I was stubborn, so was the mother!!

After only 3 weeks, we were experiencing success with the plan. This was when -whenever she could, the mother would sneak her child down to the classroom in the morning.

I would remind the mother when she walked into my classroom that she needed to stick with the plan and drop her daughter off at the front door. Mother claimed that her daughter was doing so well now that she could start bringing her daughter to the room again. After two days of experiencing bawling scenes of "goodbyes," I looked at the mother and said, "Sorry! This isn't working. You need to stick to the plan. Your daughter was doing so well and just look at what's happening now."

In just two days, things quickly returned to the crying/bawling and the "I'm going to throw" scenes. The mother was upset with me - and said to me - the statement "Oh you're going to get your own way again!" in which I responded, "It's not a matter of me getting my way or not, it's what's best for your daughter."

In fear that I'd get the principal involved again, she returned to dropping the girl off at the front door.

During the early days of the plan, I had several people (employees) in the building that would cuddle this girl when they saw her crying and they would give her the attention that she wanted . . . This girl loved the attention and hoped that one of them would realize how "bad off" she appeared to be and maybe one of them would let her go home. I had to be firm with the employees to not react to this child's crying behavior . . . but to react positively to her behavior when and only when - she was not crying or tearing up. I told them to provide positive reinforcement to appropriate behavior.

I had everyone on board except one associate who would hug the girl when she was bawling and when I reminded the associate to just leave the girl alone - she would claim, "I didn't say anything to her." I had many conversations with that associate about not hugging this girl and telling her how much you understand how she is feeling. . . This girl looked for this associate every morning and would run to her and turn on the tears -on demand -in this associate's presence. Even had the mother tell me a couple times (in hatred) that her daughter hoped that Mrs. Hugs (the associate) was there today instead of me on the way to school in the car. Ouch! But I have big shoulders.

We have been successful with this plan since the mother stopped sneaking her daughter to the classroom since second week of January and all employees were on board. Sometime at the beginning of February, the mother stopped putting the family picture in the lunch box.

At conferences at the end of March, mother shared her concern about next year having her daughter return and repeat this behavior in first grade - the crying and carrying on. I told her to continue dropping her daughter off at the front door and not walking her to the classroom. Mother immediately fought this with another excuse, "Well her little brother will be starting preschool next year and I AM WALKING him to his classroom." I suggested that after a couple weeks to stop walking her son to his preschool room because he'd be capable of doing that on his own and just drop both of them off at the front door. I even suggested giving her daughter the responsible of dropping her brother off at the preschool room since it was on the way to her first grade room would make her feel very important and needed. Mother frowned at my suggestion.

Oh well - not my problem next year!
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Old 04-01-2012, 07:29 AM
 
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I would probably lose patience at some point and suggest she homeschool her children.

Well, I wouldn't say it aloud, just think it.

Good luck with this situation.
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Ignoring...
Old 04-01-2012, 07:49 AM
 
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Here is my question about ignoring. I totally get the concept and I agree with it to some extent. However, what do you suggest teacher's do when the behavior is so disruptive, kids can't concentrate, can't learn, etc.? I have actually had to reteach lessons the next day! It's totally not fair to the other kids! I have a kid (older than kindergarten, by the way, much older...) who screams, yells, makes noises, moves things, hides in the classroom and continues to yell, lays on the floor kicking and punching it, etc. It's just so sad that I've been told to ignore it when all my other students can't concentrate or learn.
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Old 04-01-2012, 07:54 AM
 
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It's sounds like you have done everything you can to help this little girl learn to become independent. What is so frustrating in situations like this is the "mother" and "Mrs. Hugger" enabling the child and giving the child all the "control."

I am so glad your principal was firm and took action. I am so glad your principal sided with you and wasn't afraid of the "parents' and getting in trouble if a parent is unhappy.

Personally, I have had criers each year. In the beginning of the school year I try to make them feel comfortable, but once I realize it is a pattern and they are okay I ignore the crying. I had one year where it took a little boy three months to even join the class in whatever we were doing. He would sit on the floor and cry and cry and cry. After checking with his family to make sure all was okay with him I began to ignore him. The other children also ignored him. In the middle of the lesson I would encourage him to join us, but that usually just made the crying worse. I would leave a spot for him on the rug or at the table. I would leave his work there. Rarely quickly he would take the work and even would slip into his chair. If I mentioned he had joined us he would go back on the floor. I stopped mentioning anything. Eventually he joined us and the crying stopped.

Last year I had a crier all year long. If anything was different he would cry. I spoke to his mother who would speak to him about being a "big boy," but that didn't stop. At least his parent was on board with not walking him to the door, etc.

This year I have a parent that does what your parent is doing. It makes me crazy when parents undress their children and put their things away for them. I've had the "we are teaching responsibility" conversation with the parent, but still.....

I have learned that as long as the child is safe if I ignore and go on the child will eventually join the group. It is very annoying and distracting, but in the end, despite the parent you are doing what is best for the child and the child is learning to be self-sufficient.


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How frustrating!
Old 04-01-2012, 07:58 AM
 
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Our school has the doors locked and parents are not permitted to walk any children in--Unless of course there is a very good reason and the teacher has been contacted and given permission. We have a very strict policy about this because of a situation that was just like the one you are describing. We encourage all kids to ride the bus, in fact. Maybe your school can institute some type of policy that the doors are locked and parents need to go. Of course, you'd have to have solid backing up from your principal.

Also, in recent years, all parents who come into the school for any reason must have clearances and a badge. If not, they must be escorted by the secretary, which isn't realistic first thing in the morning...

Our preschool has a separate entrance and different starting/ending times, so that's not an issue....

Good luck!
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Old 04-01-2012, 08:43 AM
 
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I understand! This little girl wasn't quiet in her crying and bawling and screaming "I think I'm going to throw up" statements.

That's why I probably used the name "Plugging Ear" as my anon name! :-)

She'd scream in the middle of my lessons, "I am going to throw up" between her loud whimpers and loud bawls.

We have a "one toilet restroom" attached to our classroom. I would response, "Well hurry and go to the restroom and hurry back for we are about to begin a cool activity."

This wasn't the response she wanted and she'd scream, "I NEED TO GO TO THE NURSE. I think I'm going to throw up!" I would response, "If you're going to throw up, go the toilet in our restroom and throw up. And then hurry back though - so you don't miss this." And I would continue speaking to the class about what they were going to get to do next -like this conversation with this girl was no big deal.

Although - let me tell you I was upset inside. I wanted to string her up from the ceiling. But I stayed calm - showed no reaction - I spoke in a matter of a fact tone. Her behavior interrupted learning in the classroom. Many times when I returned to the class, I had to say, "Okay - where were we?"

Mrs. Hugs (the associate) would anger me even more by interrupting and telling me and the class - that the girl threw up on the restroom floor like there was a fire - and asking me if she should go to the nurse for she did "throw up" - and having to trust this associates description at the time in front of the class - I had her take the girl to the nurse.

And then for me -5 minutes later -when I get the other students independently working on seat work, I walked over to see what kind of mess there was in the restroom that still needs to be cleaned up - to see a small amount of spit on the floor and NOT throw up. GRRRRRR!

And then to find how when the associate returns that the office staff (trusting the associates description that she vomited) called the mother and the child got picked up and got to go home "for spitting on the floor!!!"

xxxwiqopeirlkaldjkflmzjdk!!

Good thing I can mask my anger very well.

When she bawled and cried and attempted to speak to me while doing that, I would say, "Sorry, I will only listen when you've calmed yourself down and you can speak to me without the crying and bawling. (Love and Logic) When you are ready to talk to me without the tears, I'll be over with the class talking about Octopuses." I'd walk away immediately.


I don't know how one could totally "ignore" yelling, laying on the floor kicking and punching - especially if the other children were in line of getting hurt. A time-out (isolated) place within the room could be a solution - but who's to say this child would stay in such an area. I think an "isolated" place outside the room for recovery would be the ideal situation. I think when he was hiding in the classroom, I would see where he was to make sure he was safe -without him knowing and then let him hid there as long as he would and enjoy the rest of the class while he was hiding. :-)

Our school has an "OPEN DOOR" policy. Parent can visit. Common couresty is to call/write a note to the teacher the day before the planned visit is asked of the parents to do. But parent do not have to get permission to visit.
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Old 04-01-2012, 09:11 AM
 
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I agree it is difficult to ignore a loud screaming child and one having a tantrum. As teachers we have to keep the other children safe. I am having this same problem with a child that is disruptive in class. It is making teaching impossible.

Having said this I am doing what I can, as you are doing what you can, to continue to teach.

I think the more we give attention to the disruptive child the louder they will get and the more they will do for the attention. At the same time not giving them attention also causes things to escalate, but in my experience, not for as long as giving them attention does. It sounds weird, but for me, the less attention I give to the disruptive child the child then has to figure out another way to get the attention.

My school has an open door policy also, but parents are only allowed during non-instructional time unless they are observing or volunteering and I give the okay for them to be in the classroom. If volunteering they need to sign in and get a volunteer pass.

I actually have a time out chair in my classroom. Some children have to be directed to it. Others go to it when they need a time out. It works for me, but that doesn't mean it will work for everyone.

I also have a teacher that I use when I need a time out from a child. I send the child to this person and it helps me and the class in addition to the child. When the child returns usually everyone is calm again.

It is not easy doing what we do. You are working very hard at helping this child learn that life is not always about them, and they have responsibilities. I'm sorry you have enablers in your school that are enabling this little person to control them.

My only additional suggestion is to count down the days left having to be this person's teacher. Do what you can to enjoy your class and do what you can to survive the year. It is not easy, but soon it will be over and you will have time to regroup and begin another year.
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Thanks...
Old 04-01-2012, 09:44 AM
 
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Thanks...I've told this kid to take a break, given him spots in the room to go, spots in the school (supervised of course), etc...but he refuses to take a break. Administration has told me nothing can be done unless he is physically hurting himself or someone else...so kicking and hitting the floor is not a physical threat and therefore they won't get involved.
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Old 04-01-2012, 10:06 AM
 
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They called my mom and told her to take me home because I wasn't ready for kindergarten. I was four years old. Mom did take me home, but the following year she sent me to first grade (age 5) not kindergarten.

I cried the whole day, every day. I didn't dislike school. I actually enjoyed the activities, but I missed my mom something terrible. I sobbed, and I often did throw up because I was so upset about not having my mother with me. I did not want anyone to baby me. I did not want to disrupt others. I was not wanting attention from the teachers or students. I wanted my mom with me.

School was the first time I had ever been without my mother. I had never been left with a babysitter, ever. My mother was my safety net. Nobody had ever prepared me to be without her. I was not old enough to know how to articulate my feelings. My mom dropped me off in the parking lot and never came in with me. She would not come pick me up if the teacher called to say I was upset and crying. She would not pack my lunch because she wanted me to learn to eat other people's food. She finally did pack my lunch, but only after they saw that I would eat nothing the school prepared. I also wouldn't eat breakfast because my stomach was in knots.

My teacher was always great to ignore my crying. If I happened to be sobbing too loudly, she moved me to the cloakroom where I stayed until I controlled myself enough to rejoin the group.

Naturally I don't know anything about this child to know if she is having any similar issues. The first month of school was the worst for me, but I still often had crying spells all year long. I finally did outgrow them.
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Old 04-01-2012, 10:53 AM
 
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I had a 3rd grade child last year who behaved exactly like yours... She was just ok the first couple of weeks because her cousin was a former student and encouraged her. She was anxious and always had that "ready for flight" look. Then the anxiety got the best of her.

She would kick and scream right outside my door while clutching mama. Mama would bribe her...then other relatives joined in... one day the dad showed up with the child and insisted that I not yell at her. HUH??? Just to appease him and the child, I AGAIN affirmed my commitment to her. I do think the parents were just so frustrated they had to blame someone. The child couldn't explain her fears, either, and would just randomly come up with excuses.

Finally, my admin insisted that the child be dropped off at the front door and she'd escort her to my room. There was some success, but not for long. Eventually, the child refused to leave her house.

I found out from previous teachers back to kinder that this child was the same way with them.

After 2 weeks of not coming to school, I heard that the family transferred the child to another school.

Recently, 20/20 had a report about children with OCD—specifically, irrational fears that that caused anxiety in children such as mine and yours. Wow, did I learn something! The report really helped me to get past the “mama needs to quit babying her child” thinking which may not always be the case.

These kids really do need help. I’d really like to know what happened to my little crier. I do hope both she and her family get the help they need. If you hear that the same behaviors are showing up next year, you might want to let the teacher know that a counseling referral might be in order.

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wow!
Old 04-01-2012, 11:32 AM
 
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I say that parent takes the cake! It is the parent who can't let go, not the child. I am sure the parent is feeding that dependency when they are at home. So sad...
As for those that are so disruptive that you can't ignore, I had a child like that this year. I was 'warned' about this child from his 4K teacher. She said he cried all year long. Students who were in class with him last year automatically put their hands over their ears when it started. My classroom is close to the door that leads to our playground. As soon as he got cranked up, I took little Johnny to the porch outside the door, told him to turn his face away from the building and cry to his heart's content. I stepped inside the building and shut the door (I could always see him and he was very close and safe.)When he'd quiet down I'd open the door and ask if he was finished. First time he started up again so I said, "Guess not!" then shut the door again. When he finally settled down I'd take him back to the room. I did this 2-3 times and problem solved! It helped that I had an assistant who could stay in the room with my other students.

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Old 04-01-2012, 03:49 PM
 
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This was the first year I had criers past the first day of school. My the end of the week, I was done with being compassionate. I told them if they didn't stop they needed to go flip their card. They seemed to pull together after that. They were both good students who didn't want a bad behavior report. I was surprised that the picture in the lunchbox caused it to be worse. I always thought that was a good idea! But with my this child, crying began anew at lunch time. Mom wised up to this and took the picture away. She was quite supportive.

Last year, I had a very clingy mom. Someone actually told me she was crying out on the sidewalk with her husband comforting her after I told them they could not walk son to classroom anymore per our principal's policy. She was the sweetest parent ever and I felt bad for her but she really needed to cut the apron strings for the little boy's sake.

Wonder what next year's crop will bring??
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I know it's not funny,
Old 04-01-2012, 04:03 PM
 
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but I had to laugh, reading your description of this mom. People can be so nutty! Obviously the child is not the one with the problem so much as the mom is. She has a near-pathological need to be needed, and her daughter is just doing what she is "supposed" to do to keep her mom happy. If she doesn't throw the fit, she will feel guilty for making mom think that she doesn't care about her or miss her. She's putting on a show because her mom wants, needs and expects a show! Mom is a narcissist. That's my armchair psychologist diagnosis, anyway. Mom needs strict boundaries and rules, as in "Your presence is disruptive. You will not be allowed down the hall without permission from admin."

As for the kid, if it were me, I would put a trash can next to her and put a roll of paper towels on her desk. I have done this with a couple of second graders - it works! I wouldn't even let her go to the restroom to "throw up", much less to the nurse's office - but I'm mean like that! If Mrs. Hugs insists on getting involved, I would be tempted to start telling he kid to go down and tell Mrs. Hugs about it, every time I sensed the beginnings of a whimper out of her. (Not really what you want to do for the sake of the girl, but a temptation, nonetheless!)

Stick to your guns, and know that you are doing right by this kid. I feel sorry for her future husband!
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Old 04-01-2012, 07:39 PM
 
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Eh! Exhausting for you, so disruptive for the other kids. Tell the mother how difficult this has been and from that, see if it's the mother's fault. Ask the mom to stop the photo business. That's just unnecessary. (Or take the photo away if you can. Might not be kind, but you have to think about what everyone needs. Is that illegal to do?) What the mom needs to understand is that not only is this very unhelpful, but she is stiffling her daughter. At that point, also get your school's psychologist involved for help here. Either the kid isn't ready for school or the kid can't separate, but by now, this problem has gone on too long and you need to do something.

I should also add that even by 2nd grade, these kids haven't learned how to separate. Or, rather, the mom hasn't learned. I had a few parents who needed strong language to stop bringing their kids into my classroom and then hanging out there. I couldn't get the day going and the kids were totally unsettled. This really became an issue when the moms showed up about a half hour before dismissal. That time was awful. I had a lot to do to finish the day, be sure the kids all had their stuff, and kids were ready for the transition between school and home and yet there was mom stalking outside our door. In that case, I had to ask the parents to stay in their cars at pick-up. Much, much easier.
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Old 04-02-2012, 05:55 AM
 
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Send her home and tell mom to try again next year. She is not ready. If this is happening at the end of the school year.
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Old 04-04-2012, 07:39 AM
 
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I actually had this happen with 2 different (and unrelated!)boys who were in my third grade class one year. They would cling to their mom's legs, make themselves throw up, cry "I want my mommy!" for an hour, disrupting the class, etc. Talk about separation anxiety!

It was so bad we had the principal and social worker go out to their cars every morning and literally pry them away from their mothers and then spend the first hour of school trying to calm them down.

The principal, social worker, school psychologist, special ed teacher and everyone else we could think of talked to these boys and tried to help them. We tried rewards, behavior charts, and on and on and on all year. Nothing worked and it went on all year without letting up. This was in the 1990's. I was never so glad to be done with a school year in all my years of teaching.

2 days ago I was reading my local newspaper. There on the front page was a photo of one of those crying mama's boys, who has been arrested for selling drugs as well as a hate crime.

It makes me so sad. It's like he never had a chance. I have no idea what we could have done differently.

Good luck to you. I wish something had worked in my situation that I could offer up as advice.
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crying
Old 04-04-2012, 09:04 AM
 
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I've had my share of criers over the year, but one first grader took the cake. She cried over half a year. The first 5 weeks she cried in my team partner's classroom, all day every day, at the top of her lungs. The school psychologist said it was separation anxiety, mom said it was the mean teacher. So she demanded that her child be put into my classroom. I must have been a mean teacher as well, because the child continued to cry until January. Then one day it just stopped.

Years later I found out (from the child who was then an adult) that she had grown up in a very dysfunctional and abusive household and that she was worried that her mother and baby sister would not be alive when she got home at the end of the schoolday. When the father went to prison for homicide, life became much better.
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