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I've never seen kids so addicted to technology
Old 02-26-2020, 05:53 PM
 
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My new school is 1:1 in grades 3-5 and 1st and 2nd grades have Chromebook carts in each room (my old district had Chromebook carts in each room).

I've never seen kids so addicted to technology. If they're on technology when I come to get them (and they ALWAYS are, and it's just playing games) they throw temper tantrums. Today, one class was having free time (which they get all the time) and they acted like it was the end of the world.

I've never seen anything like it. I'm so fed up with the kids acting like technology is the only way to learn, they need to be on it 24/7 and pulling them off of it takes a major act of God.

I've been using technology in my classroom for years and have never had this problem before.

Is this everywhere? What's the deal?


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Old 02-26-2020, 06:18 PM
 
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Itís the same way at my school, 1:1, k-6. I teach pull out gifted and they are limited to one lesson I teach using Nearpod. They want to play games but I donít allow it on my time. Iíve had them complain and whine but I stand my ground. One student asked his mom to take him out so he can play on the computer in his class but mom said no. Lol 😂
Kids today have no creativity or imagination anymore. I wish we had one day at school where computers, iPads, Smartphones, and TVs were shut down. I bet everyone would go into a frenzy. Some teachers use technology to babysit because they are tired of dealing with behavior issues.
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Old 02-26-2020, 06:24 PM
 
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I am teaching technology this year and I almost never let the kids play games. Some of the younger ones play some games but they always are for a purpose and never are the entire time. Sometimes I let kids play a game (same theory as above) when they are waiting for eveyrone to get logged in - again, younger grades. My 3-5 haven't played a game all year long.

We went 1-1 this year. We will see. I don't see that kids are overly done on it. I haven't had any problem getting kids to log off. No whines.
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Old 02-26-2020, 06:32 PM
 
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I believe there are already studies about how kids have become addicted and it is bad for a developing young brain.

In middle school, very few of the kids actually do work on them, and itís the same for hs. And in hs they pull out the phones and will be using both. And the way the classes are set up itís sometimes impossible to see what they are doing on them as a lot of chairs are against the wall.
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Old 02-26-2020, 08:15 PM
 
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We have been a 1:1 school for many years. There are some benefits. For example, especially for the youngest kids, we can put them on an engaging app like Lexia during small group rotations (or I do it during progress monitoring) which is a whole lot better than the days of super long "independent reading" blocks where 80% of the class was just flipping pages in books or messing around.

Personally, I think kids are on screens WAY too much and I don't use the i pads/chromebooks at all in my room except for when I need to take individual data. In some rooms where the teachers consider themselves "the most tech savvy" those kids are literally staring at those screens all day long. It was really hard not to roll my eyes when one of the teachers was very proud of herself for figuring out how to get all of the math manipulatives on the screen for kids to click on so she didn't have to mess with the actual manipulatives. That defeats the whole purpose of manipulatives!


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Old 02-27-2020, 02:48 AM
 
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Quote:
It was really hard not to roll my eyes when one of the teachers was very proud of herself for figuring out how to get all of the math manipulatives on the screen for kids to click on so she didn't have to mess with the actual manipulatives. That defeats the whole purpose of manipulatives!
Uggghhh!! You are so right!


I agree that tech is out of control. It should be a piece of kids' learning, not the only thing they are used to.
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Old 02-27-2020, 04:40 AM
 
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In my opinion, many parents think
--If my kid keeps quiet while on a screen, what's not to love?--

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I'm so fed up with the kids acting like technology is the only way to learn
In my district, the internet has been up and down a lot lately. I smile when it's down because I imagine what happens with those classrooms who pride themselves on being 85% plus electronic.
Comparing results at the end of the year, my district finds that those of us teachers who still use paper & pencil are just as effective as those who are huge on technology.
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I agree...
Old 02-27-2020, 06:44 AM
 
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I think when technology advanced to I-Pads and chromebooks, in the beginning it was a good thing. There was a novelty to it, it seemed to engage the students more, and it could add a lot of interesting elements to lessons, which it still can do.

However, I did see a decline in focusing on others, specifically listening skills. I also saw that when the Smartboards were first introduced, they were wonderfully engaging. In my K-3 building, only the third grades had them for awhile. Once they were in every classroom, the novelty wore off quickly. I also saw kids develop an expectation that everything was going to be entertaining and fun. In a perfect world, that would be great, but in the real world of educational expectations, objectives, and goals, that isn't necessarily the case.
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Old 02-27-2020, 08:21 AM
 
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In my opinion, one of the biggest problems with chromebooks in the classroom is that some so-called educational games are designed to be just as addictive to young brains as non-educational games. And, we truly are talking about neurobiological addiction, not just that they enjoy them a lot.

I understand the temptation to allow too much of this in school. Chromebook gaming time is a powerful incentive for kids and discipline problems often disappear right up until you try to make them quit playing and get to work. And, there's plenty of research that supports that kids DO learn this way. But, I think more attention needs to be given to whether the effect on developing brains is worth the gain in knowledge and skills.
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Not officially technology, but...
Old 02-27-2020, 10:35 AM
 
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I have been teaching for 30 years. I am now hearing from kids how much their PARENTS play video games. Ugh.


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Old 02-27-2020, 05:20 PM
 
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My 5th graders are definitely addicted to gaming and phones. The worst workers are the ones constantly talking about it. I teach reading, and I hardly use my chromebooks.

Also, a lot of kids do not learn through screens. My daughter is a freshman, and she learns by writing notes on paper and direct teaching. Her honors geometry teacher only uses the chromebooks for notes, lessons, everything and she has struggled a lot. The days the internet has been down and he had to teach "old school" she got 100s..

I feel like there is value in some technology, but there's also a lot of value in paper and pencil.
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Old 02-28-2020, 07:30 AM
 
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We are living in a technological era. These children are digital natives. From a tender age, they were exposed to technology mainly because we are living in a working world. Hence, technology has become the best baby sitter. Parents use technology to keep children quiet while they may get the necessary rest. Parents also use technology to foster their child/children ability to focus, and to build a large vocabulary through the tablets. However it is the very thing impeding the development of their abilities that parents are so eager to foster.

Children lack social skills and interaction in the natural environment. And because the devices give them the ability to process multiple actions at once, I believe it is taking away the need for younger minds to process the information themselves. Look at when it is taken away in the classroom, it becomes very hard for them. This is because the brain is use to the high level of stimulation that the technology provides. As a result, students become lazy and when they don’t have technology, they say it is boring.

Like other addictions, screen time creates significant changes in brain chemistry. The most notable is the release of dopamine also known as the pleasure chemical, dopamine is central to a number of addictions for example sugar, cocaine, alcohol. What I recommend is that you as the teacher suggest to the parents to limit how much time their child/children use technology at home so that when it is taken away why won’t feel so helpless.
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