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MissouriECSE MissouriECSE is offline
 
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anyone worried about
Old 05-17-2020, 09:09 AM
 
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massive layoffs in the fall? I just wonder if districts are going to continue to pay their teachers next year.

A little worried myself


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Old 05-17-2020, 09:10 AM
 
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We have already signed contracts for next year, and honestly we are already running on bare bones.
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:14 AM
 
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Who would they be laying off? Our class sizes are already massive.
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:22 AM
 
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People continue to pay school district taxes. The money is there. I can't imagine them letting teachers go. JMO
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:28 AM
 
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If anything we need more teachers so we can reduce class sizes and spread out more.


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Old 05-17-2020, 09:41 AM
 
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It's a possibility . The tax money will be reallocated in California so various programs will suffer.
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I agree
Old 05-17-2020, 09:44 AM
 
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In order to get back to ‘normal’ more teachers will be needed. However, I’m not sure where the money will come from. Schools are funded differently everywhere. Many of the school sites will not physically support more teachers and maintain safe distancing with the buildings that they have. I hope that some areas won’t have to resort to continuing distance learning so that they can increase student:teacher ratios.

I expect many different models will be proposed in the near future.

Last edited by luvmycat; 05-17-2020 at 10:06 AM..
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Next Year Possible Furlough & Position Cuts
Old 05-17-2020, 09:57 AM
 
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We signed our contract in January for 2020-2021.

I work in a very large district.

During the board meeting 2 weeks ago I was surprised to hear about financial deficits due to COVID (receiving less federal & state funds)

District staff mentioned
1. furlough a few days (planning days) for all (this area would save the most money)
2. cutting central office positions
3. Cutting some intervention positions.
4. Increase class sizes ( results in needing less teachers)

My district always find a way to pay us, they never mention furlough unless it is a dire situation & last result Then, it will be done with as less impact as possible for staff.

I am not concerned though. I have 23 yrs in the district.

As in normal situation, If contracts were signed & positions get cut, the affected personnel move into another position in the district in which he/she is qualified.

Last edited by Dr. A; 05-17-2020 at 01:28 PM..
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Old 05-17-2020, 10:01 AM
 
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I'm told years ago before I joined my current district there were pay reductions. Everyone kept their job, but everyone took a 3% pay cut. I'm told it sucked, but everyone had a job. Oh, and they kept their benefits.
If I were to face the same thing, it'd suck but we would make it through.
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Old 05-17-2020, 10:03 AM
 
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With adjusting class sizes to allow for separating the students, it doesn't seem like they would be letting teacher positions go. Seems like they'd need more teachers to make that happen.

I could see some districts shifting math and language arts coaches out of their coaching positions and putting them back into regular classrooms to help with lowering the class sizes in order to separate students.


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Old 05-17-2020, 10:08 AM
 
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If teachers teach from the on-line model, then fewer teachers will be needed. Less need for non-teaching staff as well. My daughter-in-law said that her district is considering that a certain amount of students will stay home and continue to learn on-line as in the virtual classroom while other students attend school 1/2 days and alternate days during the week. The same teacher teaches both. So far they are not rifting yet, but not replacing either.

However, if people aren't working, they aren't paying taxes.

Quote:
ďAll of these states had budgets for next year that were counting on revenues from sales tax, income tax, property tax. Well, thatís not going to be there Ö States are going to take a major hit in terms of how they fund education, and districts will take a hit because theyíre not going to get the level of state support they were counting on. Itís going to be a bad year.Ē

Interesting article -- Half of school employees are not teachers.

https://www.the74million.org/article...er-their-jobs/

Here is another from edweek - Here's how many teaching jobs could be lost in each state.

Quote:
Almost 320,000 teaching jobs could be lost if states cut their education budgets by 15 percent in a coronavirus-inflicted recession, a new analysis has found.
https://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/camp...recession.html
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Old 05-17-2020, 10:15 AM
 
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Yeah, I"ve worried about it. If not for the upcoming school year, then the year after that. I was teaching during and after the Great Recession and I know things were pretty lean for a while. Financially, I think the implications are much worse in this situation.
I know people keep talking about how one way to ease the transition back into in-person schooling is to reduce class sizes. Honestly, there is neither the money nor the number of teachers nor the physical space in schools around me to make this happen during the best of circumstances. These are not the best of circumstances.
I get the feeling that, in my district, there will be reductions in the numbers of teachers per school. When people retire or move, the positions either won't be filled or they'll transition coaches to those positions.
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Old 05-17-2020, 10:22 AM
 
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Hereís the thing, thereís already a nationwide shortage of teachers. Many districts (especially the large ones) have positions that go unfilled. They may cut positions that donít touch students (ie: coaching positions) but most districts canít afford to cut anymore than they already have.

And, if youíre lucky enough/smart enough do have class size limits in your contracts they canít increase class sizes.

I feel like districts are talking a lot, but when push comes to shove they wonít be able to do a whole lot. You canít get blood from a rock.
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Budget cuts...
Old 05-17-2020, 10:22 AM
 
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In the past, our district has RIFed all non-tenured staff and hired them back once they were more sure of what was going to happen. This has not happened for a long time, but these times are unprecedented. They have to follow a contractual deadline for notification, so that's why they do it to all the non-tenures to cover themselves legally.

I am retired, but I understand our district already had plans to reassign the coaches back to the classrooms.

I read an article about lay-offs in my state, and one inner city district is alreay laying off 47 teachers. The state senate president is already pushing a bill on furloughs for public employees, but I'm not sure who that directly will affect if it passes. The theory is for people to be able to collect the enhanced unemployment while furloughed.

If I were untenured in my district, I would be concerned. There is going to have to be a lot of money spent to ultimately get the schools ready for student return, whenever it happens, and I could see that they would have to increase the custodial staff in each building to keep up with the new sanitizing practices. Our contract is expiring in June. The old contract provisions remain in place till the new one is negotiated, but given the financial climate, I don't envy any of the negotiators in what is usually a tough process in my district to begin with. I will have retired going on three years in June. So glad I was able to!
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Old 05-17-2020, 10:36 AM
 
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I apologize for being blunt but those of you who think there will not be layoffs or pay cuts are being naive.

Where do you think the money to pay for your salaries comes from? If you are funded by local property taxes people are unemployed and many losing their homes. People are not spending money on purchases. That means less money coming in. Those districts will be in the worst shape.

If you are funded primarily through the state, again, people are unemployed. There is very little tax revenue coming in. Since education is the biggest chunk of most budgets it is obvous that there will be cuts.

If you are not tenured it is likely that you will not have a job. Since most districts with unions are required to layoff by seniority you need to look at how many teachers in your district have more seniority than you because everyone will bump down.

Yes we need teachers. But districts have a lot of options regarding who those teachers are. Administrative positions will be cut. Those administrators who are cut will move into teaching positions. Instructional coaches and teachers assigned to the district office will be cut. They will move into teaching positions. Online instruction can use larger teacher/student ratios. Less teachers needed there.

Once districts get their revised budgets they will set the number of positions they can fund. Anyone over that number is in jeopardy of being eliminated. It doesn't make any difference if you have a contract in place. If there is a loss of positions, there will be layoffs.

Last edited by sonoma; 05-17-2020 at 11:44 AM..
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Old 05-17-2020, 10:46 AM
 
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Not in the least. I have 18 years in my district, have tenure, and good ratings on evaluations. If I was nontenured, I might be slightly worried. However, they could barely get enough teachers last year. My district canít afford to lay off anyone.
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Interesting information
Old 05-17-2020, 11:26 AM
 
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It will be interesting to see how different districts in different states respond.

My district is one the lowest funded districts in my state. Our voters just rejected a parcel tax increase in March (I donít blame them, my district has not always been smart with money.) We were in deep financial hardship before the pandemic.

There will be serious layoffs. Principals might have to be in charge of two schools, which means fewer admin positions to fill. What are aides supposed to do with distance learning? One on one teaching? I bet support staff will be laid off as well.

All the talk is of schools in my area not opening in the Fall. Iím in CA and our local schools will probably follow what the local colleges and universities are doing. Since they have already announced a continue of distance learning, Iím guessing we will too.

So, if Iím teaching to a screen (of avatars, most likely, since our students canít be forced to turn on their cameras) why canít the district increase the number of my students? That would require fewer teachers. I donít know how weíd shift back to a classroom environment mid year without staff, so maybe weíd do distance later all year. It would save money on facilities, electricity, etc.

I do wish I could retire. I donít think teaching next year is going to be fun.
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Just got my contract
Old 05-17-2020, 11:41 AM
 
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Our enrollment is down in our private school. Our P said he is able to keep all staff but not give any raises. If the families come back, we can get our raises later in the year. Iím just glad nobody was cut- itís a wonderful staff.
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Old 05-17-2020, 11:45 AM
 
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I'm with sonoma! And it's not just next year we have to worry about. The repercussions of this pandemic will last for years. If not this year, then the next and the next and the next.

Teachers should be worried, imo. If not for next year, then for the forthcoming years.

Cuts need to take place in areas besides teachers, imo. Upper/central admin. for starters. Academic coaches, etc.

When I think about how much of our staff literally had little to nothing to do during our 8 weeks of remote learning...it got me thinking how expendable they were if we continue remote learning into the fall. There was literally nothing for them to do...if that were me, I'd be worried.

The budget doesn't care about class sizes. Upper admin. doesn't care about class sizes. They aren't going to have money to ensure smaller class sizes! They'll use remote teaching to take care of that dilemma. Remote teaching just means fewer teachers, more students per "class".

What is really going to suffer is the education of our students as a whole.
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Old 05-17-2020, 12:19 PM
 
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Classified and support staff will probably be the first to go, especially if the school years starts off with distance learning.

I imagine teachers will still have jobs, but with less support.
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Old 05-17-2020, 12:33 PM
 
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Well said, Sonoma. I keep hearing people talk about contracts and funding sources as if they are a magical shied against reality. Taxes do not get paid when people canít work. Class size caps can go away quickly, especially when people continue to agitate for online ďlearning.Ē And I see lots of people complaining about making phone calls, sending emails, students not doing work, etc. What are you being paid for?! Those of us who are still being paid to teach should be grateful; we may not be so lucky in a few months.
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Old 05-17-2020, 12:36 PM
 
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I’m worried. I’m not worried about layoffs, but I am worried about pay cuts.

We had over 1,000 teaching positions left unfilled before covid. We were just beginning to recover from the recession and were looking at having competitive wages for our teachers and now this. If we have pay cuts many teachers will leave and retire and we will end up having even more classrooms with only subs teaching. (If we take the pay cut the governor wants, subs will be making way more than new teachers). When adjusting for cost of living, teachers in our state are the lowest paid in the nation. Unless prices come down (not seeing that happening, the last gallon of milk I bought was $7.30) teachers will not be able to live here on their salaries.
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Old 05-17-2020, 12:42 PM
 
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I have way too much seniority in my district to have any concern about losing my job unless they close schools completely.

I do think a more likely scenario would be getting an across-the-board pay cut.
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They still need teachers
Old 05-17-2020, 12:54 PM
 
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We are maxed at 31 students (in our primary grades) and 34 (in upper elementary) by union contract. I could see if we went to staggered days, the district arguing that we could have 20 on one day and 20 on another day and that we would still have ďsmallerĒ class sizes (though I canít see the union agreeing with that). Honestly, 20 would still be too much in these days of social distancing.

Our governor in California has already suggested 10 percent pay cuts across the board for state employees. I could see something similar for our school district ó hopefully not as much as 10 percent.

At this point, the teachers have a lot of power to fight for better classroom conditions ó need for fewer students in class, more rigorous custodial cleaning, adequate breaks, enough hand sanitizer, etc. However, teachers or really anyone who is still getting a regular paycheck, will get no sympathy over money concerns from the public right now.

I do think we will be pushed to get back on campus ó the governor wanted us to go back in July ďto catch up.Ē The economy depends on people getting back to work and part of that is getting kids back in school.

It will definitely being interesting to see what this all looks like in 3 months when our new school year is set to begin.
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:02 PM
 
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Of course, I worry about cuts.
But, schools aren't saying they are closing indefinitely, more that they are going to begin online and hope to reopen during the school year. They need teachers.
I agree that some resource positions will be cut. But I don't see how one principal can be in charge of 2 schools. There is a lot going on behind the scenes that admin deals with, no way can they do two sets!
Class size may go up, but when they reopen buildings with social distancing, you simply can't cram 40 kids in the same room without them being on top of each other.
So, I don't see across the board tons of positions being cut outright, I see it more likely to be pay cuts or furloughs. No new hires.
We were supposed to get a COLA, and I'm sure that's gone now. We were supposed to get a new math program, and that isn't going to happen, either.
And I agree, that even though this way of teaching is not optimal and can be stressful, it is short sighted to complain instead of being thankful to still have a job and regular pay check, when so many people don't! I hope and pray it stays that way!
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:26 PM
 
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I am not personally worried about being cut entirely. Seniority plays a part in how lay offs are decided, and frankly, if they get all the way to me with lay offs there isn't going to be a district left. I could definitely see them making massive cuts if we were to go all online again next year. However, I think the thing that will save us is that no one is going to want to say up front we're doing that all year. There is a lot of pressure to open schools right now. Even if we can't open right away, there will always be the "plan" to open in 1-2 months.

However, I am extremely worried about pay cuts. We already had a contract negotiated for this year. I was set to get the biggest raise of my career aside from the year I finished my MA. Of course now that is not happening. At first I was trying to adjust to the idea of making the same salary, and now I'm thinking that's likely a pipe dream as well. Teacher pay is abysmal here as it is. There is a sect of veteran teachers who got houses before the boom and will be fine, because they're not paying anywhere near what the rest of us are for housing. And of course there are always people who have wealthy spouses that will also be fine.

Everyone else is going to have an extremely hard time affording basic necessities with pay cuts. Many people were already in that situation. My district has been making a fuss about doing things like furlough days and such to avoid lay offs, but IMO they need to think long and hard about at what point the salary cuts become a bigger deal than lay offs. If 80% of your staff can't afford to live on their salaries the district is going to be SOL. Our younger teachers (of which we have many) who have the ability to do so are going to just go to other fields or other states where things are in better shape. We have somewhat of a teacher shortage as it is.

And with layoffs, even though I would be "safe," I do worry about what the rest of us will be left to deal with. We're going to have more needs than ever and less staff to deal with them. My P thinks we may not have paras next year (our building currently has at least 10). Way back in the day, I was the only sped teacher in my 500 student, K-6 building and it was just an impossible job.

As far as being naive, I think it's the politicians and general public who are being naive. They seem to think we can open schools with all of these new social distancing measures in place with no money. Every idea being thrown around costs money. And we are expected to do this with significantly LESS money. It makes no sense. And while I get that part of this crisis is totally out of anyone's control- of course no one was predicting a global pandemic and the economic impacts that would have. BUT, we bail out the airline industry and the stock market without blinking an eye. Do you notice the idea of a "bail out" for schools is not even discussed? Not even mentioned as a possibility, even among teachers? Not even something people ask for? Why is that? If the government is so desperate for schools to open they should provide money to do so like they have for other industries.

Last edited by Haley23; 05-17-2020 at 01:47 PM..
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:50 PM
 
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I’m more concerned about budget cuts and how it will effect our paychecks than I am layoffs. But, I do think layoffs are a concern as well, for all sorts of positions not just teachers.

Florida has a class size amendment... K-3 can only have 18 students and 4-5 can only have 22 students. I am concerned that if we do hybrid learning or split schedule or even online only that they will toss class size out and make our classes much larger since the entire class wouldn’t be together at once thus lessening the amount of teachers we need.

My district has a semi strong union but we are a right to work state and they got rid of tenure in 2008. All teachers hired after then (me included- I started in this district in 2012) are on recurring contracts. We have to be renewed or non-renewed (long process to not renew though) by May 1st each year. I’m not sure how solid those renewals will be in the midst of all that is going on though.

My particular school is Title I so our funding is different compared to some higher income schools and our parents are not ones who would or feasibly could choose to homeschool their kids... that would effect staffing.

I do wonder if some of our instructional coach positions or “specials” positions will be cut.
Our district is extremely top heavy. The amount of district level positions we have is beyond crazy and the amount our superintendent and board members make is also insane so I’m wondering if that will be taken into account as well.

(My district/state needs to pour some serious money into 1:1 devices for all of our schools if distance learning is going to be happening in any capacity.
Our middle and high schools are all 1:1. Elementary schools were supposed to go 1:1 next year but we don’t have the funding so schools that were previously 1:1 will be losing computers to make all elementary schools be 2:1.
Currently, of my 16 students only 7 have access to a computer.)


Neither my state or district have released anything in regards to plans for next year. The only state I’ve seen that has is Maryland. I’ve looked at their plan/options to get an idea of things I could see here. Here’s a link if anybody is interested:
http://www.marylandpublicschools.org...coveryPlan.pdf
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Old 05-17-2020, 01:54 PM
 
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Quote:
IMO they need to think long and hard about at what point the salary cuts become a bigger deal than lay offs. If 80% of your staff can't afford to live on their salaries the district is going to be SOL.

BUT, we bail out the airline industry and the stock market without blinking an eye. Do you notice the idea of a "bail out" for schools is not even discussed? Not even mentioned as a possibility, even among teachers? Not even something people ask for? Why is that? If the government is so desperate for schools to open they should provide money to do so like they have for other industries.
We are in the same situation. We donít have enough to teachers, teacher pay is so low that it is almost impossible to live here. Pay cuts are only going to make things worse, but Iím pretty sure they will happen. I also agree with Haley that education is just as deserving of bailouts as airlines and banks and we need to be pushing our government to help us out here.
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Old 05-17-2020, 02:40 PM
 
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There is an attempt to "bail out" education in the Heroes Act. Sadly, it looks like it will not pass in the senate.

You may want to talk to some of the teachers at your sites that were teaching in 2008. You may be suprised at what can be done during a financial crisis.

Remember that people in the top heavy positions that may be cut will end up bumping a teacher with lower seniority.

There were already parts of the country where teachers cannot afford to live on their salaries. That is why some teachers have such long commutes.
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Praying no lay offs
Old 05-17-2020, 04:42 PM
 
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The district I work announced retirement incentives making me think they want to eliminate some teaching positions.
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Old 05-17-2020, 05:23 PM
 
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Thatís a good deal. Someone at the top of the pay scale can retire with a little bonus and her salary with cover two lower paid teachers.
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Old 05-17-2020, 05:24 PM
 
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You may want to talk to some of the teachers at your sites that were teaching in 2008. You may be surprised at what can be done during a financial crisis.
I was teaching in 2008- we took huge pay cuts and have never gotten them back (we were supposed to this year). We also had furlough Fridayís for state workers including teachers. It was a mess and left our economy and schools in a bad position to take yet another hit. My immediate area is also still barely recovering from earthquakes, lava, and hurricane flooding.
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Old 05-17-2020, 05:48 PM
 
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My district has currently furloughed 14 out of 62 teachers. That is 23 percent of our staff. I have no clue as to how we will teach in a normal situation, let alone if we are required to have smaller class sizes. I pray that all the furloughed teachers are recalled. We have a school board meeting this week, where they will establish a tentative budget for next year. I am sick over this.
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:04 PM
 
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I am not worried about losing my job completely, but my position (reading intervention/librarian) will likely be on the chopping block by the end of next year if not sooner. That would put me back in a regular classroom and bump a teacher with fewer years. We have been warned that double digit furlough days are in our future along with RIFs/layoffs. We were recently told that we probably won't have any idea what next year will look like until July at least. After we close out our rooms this week teachers likely won't be allowed back in until August.

I was around in 2008. I had been teaching one year past the cut off for RIFs at the time. We took furlough days for at least one year, I think 2 weeks of furloughs. At the time, DH and I were lucky in that he had just gotten hired on in SPED. Even with the furlough cuts we felt like we were making a lot more money at that time. It's not going to feel that way this time around!

On top of district cuts, DH works a summer job with a friend at tech shows/conventions. Those won't be happening until summer 2021 at the earliest. I'm already looking at ways to cut back on our monthly budget.

I do wish that the government would be as willing to bail schools out as they are to bail out big business. I mean, if we don't go back, where will parents send their children while they are at work? At least offer us a bit more for the child care that is needed.
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Old 05-17-2020, 08:56 PM
 
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I was teaching in 2008- we took huge pay cuts and have never gotten them back (we were supposed to this year).
Same situation here! That's why I was supposed to get such a big raise. I was going to get back 2 of the 4 steps I lost back then as well as a new step, so 3 total. Education funding has never recovered from 2008 here. We were hoping to make some changes this year with a more democratic legislature. Obviously that's not happening now and I truly have trouble seeing how we come back from this. I don't consider the Heroes act much of an effort. Everyone knew it was going to be DOA at the Senate and not even all of the Democrats voted for it in the House. That's pathetic. There is no real effort to do anything for education.

The COL in my area was also just nowhere near what it is now back in 2008. Housing prices have literally tripled. When I was house hunting last year (something I could only afford to do because I inherited my down payment) I was sick looking at what the same listings had sold for pre 2012 or so. My own townhouse sold in 2007 for over $200K less than what I paid. Teachers weren't in the same financial situation at all in 2008. There is no "commuting from somewhere more affordable." Nowhere is more affordable. Rent for a 1 bedroom is at least $800 more than what I paid back in 2010. And I'm not talking about trendy downtown neighborhoods either-this is everywhere.

On year ten with my MA+40 I finally got up to $50K for my salary this year. I only do okay as a single person here because having semi-wealthy grandparents afforded me a lot of privileges in life. My district also got a grant to run after school programs 2 years ago, and working 5 hours per week as a tutor has allowed me to build up my savings more.

I started teaching in 2010 and joined my current district in 2013. We were still losing steps and having furlough days. We didn't start getting regular raises again until 2017, and 2 of the furlough days became permanent. People just can't afford to do that again.

My teammate was in the district in 2008. She said it was very different because they had a ton of warning. They knew in January that this was coming for the next school year and the district did everything they could to move people around to other positions rather than lose people. They had moved a couple of new teachers around to other buildings, but people ended up retiring and they were able to bring them back; our building lost no one. They had ten furlough days- an extra week at Christmas and an extra week at SB- agreed on by the union in exchange for keeping people from being let go.

I also see what Greyhoundgirl is saying about layoffs. We have a teacher shortage now, so there's really not that much they can do in that department. I was watching negotiations last week and district was "trying to avoid layoffs" while in the same breath saying they can't take away steps from newly hired teachers because they have a hard time filling positions/they're afraid those people then won't sign contracts. That doesn't add up with claiming layoffs. Class sizes are already around 30-32 in elementary- what are they going to do, make them 40? We'll be against fire code. We had a position on my team this year that went unfilled until November, when the district finally filled it with someone from an agency (super expensive to do). We were lucky to snag our intern for the position next year.

Last edited by Haley23; 05-17-2020 at 10:30 PM..
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Old 05-17-2020, 09:27 PM
 
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if we don't go back, where will parents send their children while they are at work?
I agree with this. Personally, I don't see schools doing much to have social distancing in place. I believe schools will open no matter what, Parents need babysitting when they return to work. There isn't money to reduce class sizes and hire more teachers. There is in most schools no place to add more classrooms. Children are expendable and don't vote so in the long run education will be the last to change for COVID19. You can't teach students on-line when parents need to work. Colleges/universities/trade schools don't need a parent to do on-line teaching, these are young adults.

I am glad I retired because I really can't see my old district doing anything for safety. Its always worrying about schools being childrens' safe place. I agree we are a safe place and provide meals, we are necessary in many places but I think it will cost us being able to be safe/social distance.
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in 2008
Old 05-18-2020, 07:25 AM
 
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My district laid off all teachers will 11 years or less seniority.

My position was eliminated so I returned to a classroom assignment.

Assistant principals were cut. They returned to clasroom assignments.

Principals at elementary level schools with less than 1200 kids were assigned two schools.

Salary steps were frozen. No moving up for years or education level.

Elementary PE and music teachers cut. Many of those did not have elementary credentials so no jobs.

No supply budget for paper, pencils, etc. We were told to ask parents for donations.
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Old 05-18-2020, 04:37 PM
 
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If they cut people up to 11 years of seniority there would be 3 teachers left out of 50+ in my building . I have 7 years in the district and am considered a "long time veteran." I have more seniority than probably 85% of my school and I'd estimate at least 70% of the district. We are a tiny district so everyone knows each other.

It was not like that when I started, but like I said, COL was not the same at all. People are leaving for other fields or new college grads are coming from out of state, building their resume for 1-3 years, and then moving back to their home states which are more affordable/offer better pay. It's also not uncommon for people to stay only until they start having kids, and then they just quit working because it's a wash with daycare costs (or daycare is more than what we make, if you have multiple young children).

We got some estimates from our board today. They are still waiting for exact numbers from the state as far as how much is being cut, but it's expected to be awful. At 5% they won't give raises (this was already pretty much guaranteed to happen), at 10% they will reduce admin staff, cut department budgets, and put on a general hiring freeze, 15% they will do salary reductions/furlough days, and 20% they will do layoffs. We do have what I would consider some unnecessary district office people- union says if it comes down to it they will let those people go, but because we're such a small district that really won't generate that much money. Basically, they said it might make us feel better but it won't save enough to use the money to give raises or anything.

We're trying to get yet another tax initiative to raise money on the ballot (to switch from flat tax to fair tax, which would make up for 2/3 of the state deficit, 50% would be required to go to education), but these things NEVER pass. I'll do my part but it is so disheartening to have this stuff fail miserably every election. And I hold out hope that if things change on a federal level with the 2020 election, maybe more money could come then.
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How would it work?
Old 06-13-2020, 12:50 PM
 
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Cuts will affect others before they reach teachers, I think. If online learning continues in the Fall, I don't see how teacher assistants will justify their continued employment. In my school, they did not have to help classroom or specials teachers at all. Not sure what their duties were from March till June. Maybe they will assist with hybrid implementation?
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Old 06-13-2020, 01:13 PM
 
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My district is simply not replacing anyone who leaves of their own accord. Jobs are combined when possible, and some teachers are even being asked if they are willing to be reassigned...they can ďforceĒ you to move, but rarely do they want to try that. For example, 2 5th grade teachers have left...theyíve asked if any other teachers 1-4 are willing to move to fill one of the positions. The they donít have to hire anyone. If aides resign (I.e. mine was a college student waiting on an internship. She recently got accepted for one so she has resigned), they are not being replaced. Our title teachers are being reassigned to classrooms. They even still allowed us to order supplies, with a limited budget compare to past years.

I admire that they are doing everything they can to avoid actively laying anyone off. I admire that they paid everyone - including non cert hourly staff (at their maximum allowable hours per week) for the remainder of the school year even though we were shut down. I think they are trying hard to do the best they can with what they have, knowing there will be less in the future.
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Old 06-13-2020, 01:28 PM
 
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Our district supposedly cut all the district positions they could after 2008, trying not to disturb classroom numbers. They say they have not brought back most of those positions.

I think attrition will make a difference, but if they donít replace retiring people, what happens to students serviced by those positions?

I am not particularly worried, But I could very well end up back in a regular classroom rather than my tech position, and that is not what I want... we will probably end up paying more into our pensions to save the district money. And we wonít be getting any raises expected.
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Old 06-13-2020, 01:45 PM
 
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It's part of why I have no interest in switching schools right now. I don't want to be lowest in seniority wherever I go. Our state said budget cuts are scheduled to be the worst this year but will be continuing until 2025.
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Old 06-13-2020, 02:12 PM
 
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My district is tiny. We got rid of 3 district admin positions. IMO there are least 3 more that are unnecessary, but no one asked me. They didn't lay off any teachers but there were like 7 positions where people left and those jobs will not be filled. This will make class sizes larger and caseloads larger for service providers.

We took a salary freeze. They say they will back pay the expected raises "when they get the money." I will believe that when I see the money in my paycheck. A lot of people seem to have hope that new tax initiatives on the ballot will pass. Like I said previously, I'll do my part, but I think the chances of this stuff passing is slim to none. We've tried several times and people won't vote for it in good times!

We are hearing 21-22 is expected to be much worse. Our super is saying most of the rural districts in the state will be insolvent if what they're predicting happens, and we would be insolvent within a couple of years. This year education took a 15% cut. The governor did direct a ton of CARES money to schools, but that can only be used for covid related expenses, not to back fill decimated budgets. It also has to be spent in full by Dec. It was a lot of money- my district has bought all of the cleaning supplies, thermometers, masks, etc. and they don't know what they're going to do with the rest. While at least it's good they were able to buy that stuff/not have to worry about that stuff AND a decimated budget, it's kind of sadly ironic. Some big districts got like 20 million dollars. How are they going to spend that on cleaning supplies??
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