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Large class and a student with NO ENLGISH!!!
Old 08-22-2014, 04:39 AM
 
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HELP!
I was worried enough when I just thought I had a huge class this year... but I'm also getting a new student who doesn't speak English at all. Just moved to the US this week (from the middle east, not sure where). Any tips? (5th grade)

TIA


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Relax!
Old 08-22-2014, 04:42 AM
 
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Prepare to be amazed by how this child aquires language this year. Pair ohm up with a helpful, patient buddy. They will find ways to communicate. Of course give as many visuals as possible. Being he's new to the country he should be entitled to services. Good luck,and try not to speak too loudly to him.
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Old 08-22-2014, 05:02 AM
 
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I bet the new student is more worried then you are! I think it would be helpful to give as many visuals as possible. Also, it might be helpful to label areas of the room, give a tour of the building, etc. It must be so scary to start a new school when you don't understand anyone.

Is the student going to get ESL services?
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Old 08-22-2014, 05:28 AM
 
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This was me last year: 36 in 6th grade and two non English speakers. I had a few students who were really helpful and made sure to watch out for them. They spent a lot of time on the computer doing Starfall and Abcya while I was teaching the rest of the class. I also found copies of our novel studies in Spanish so they could at least understand the plot. It was a rough year, but by May they were pretty much fluent in English! Wow!
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Old 08-22-2014, 05:40 AM
 
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This is the norm in my school. We have over 40 different languages spoken in our school and discontinued ELL/BIL last year.

This helps...
1. lots of visuals. We label the room with the basics, such as clock. If you know the home language, I would include the native language under the labeled word

2. If you have a laptop available, there are sites where you can type in a phrase and it translates into the home language.

3. If the child is a refugee, there might be social issues. If there is another student in the building, I would buddy them up twice a week to get the student accumated (sp).

4. Keep in mind, there will be the silent period, which can last for a year. That is perfectly fine, because they are absorbing what is happening. Your student will learn so much from your other student.


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Old 08-22-2014, 06:34 AM
 
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I'm in California, so large class sizes are a given. ;-)

I had a Chinese student (VERY little English) a few years ago, and she told me that she benefited most from watching TV. :-)

She said she started with "kids' cartoons" and then started watching other things.

Makes sense since Sesame Street, etc. are designed to teach young children language (and other things :-)). There is also the visual piece with the language....

We had a Japanese student last year in 4th grade with no English. She was here for about 2 months, and then went "home" for the summer. Any gains that were made last Spring were basically GONE when she returned to school this month. We've found iPads with early language apps are helpful.

And, as mentioned before, helpful peers are key. SO many kids will be wanting to help and ALL involved learn so much!

Chele :-)

Last edited by CheleOh; 08-22-2014 at 06:51 PM..
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get to know the student
Old 08-22-2014, 07:44 AM
 
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1. Get to know the student. Learn of his strengths and weaknesses. Learn of his hobbies, things she likes to do when he has free time. Use his strengths to create individualized curriculum/based on his interests.
2. Incorporate culturally responsive curriculum: use realia (books, things) of his culture.
3. Use visuals (pictures, labels, charts, maps, diagrams etc) as was previously mentioned.
4. Allow the student to always be paired and/or grouped when you want students to work on class projects or any other assignments.
5. Learn a few phrases from the student's language: hi, how are you? Can you...Can I...etc
6. Teach the student essential vocabulary: bathroom, lunch, recess, break, right, left, and action verbs: raise (your hand), sit down, stand up, line up etc.
7. If you have a student that speaks same language and who is somewhat proficient in English, ask that student to be buddies.
8. Create a classroom of respect. Encourage other students to greet that student in both English and that student's language. This works best during morning carpet time. You can spend about 5-7 minutes each morning to ask students to share about their last night plans/or anything. I am sure your ELL will feel open to talking.
9. Do not feel upset if the student does not talk for a few months. It is a silent period: the student will have only receptive vocabulary of about 500 words. At the end of the year the student might start talking.
10. Provide quick comprehension checks often to see if the student is on task and understands you.
11. Use child-friendly language (use only simple tense structures, no perfect and perfect-progressive sentence structures. Do not use passive voice. Stay away from contractions, colloquialisms and idioms).
12. Speak slowly and clearly.
13. Repeat directions at least 3 times; make sure to write them down as well.
14. Provide wait time of up to 7 seconds when you ask that student to respond to your questions.


I hope this helps!
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all good suggestions
Old 08-22-2014, 01:55 PM
 
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You might also want to work on a few things for the student to say as well as understand:

bathroom
help
don't understand
sick
hurt
stop

These won't appear until they are in the receptive vocabulary which will build as your student feels more comfortable and begins to figure out where one word stops and the next begins---a new language sounds like one megaword. Figuring out this stuff sends people into their Silent Period. You may want to reduce your sentences to noun-verb with pointing and pictures to get the receptive vocabulary going.
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Have Your Media Person
Old 08-22-2014, 03:55 PM
 
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order Rosetta Stone until your child gets some survival vocabulary. You should probably have an on site ELD class or person with resources. I also taught in California (although last year I got a Ukranian boy in December and a Japanese boy in May.) There are several early reading websites that would have books or stories with pictures and vocab, letter sounds, etc.
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6th grade student
Old 08-22-2014, 06:50 PM
 
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Our ELL teacher took mine more frequently [this was 9 years ago so I know lots have changed]. I put her with a "helper", and put her on Starfall.


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Secondary Setting
Old 11-10-2014, 06:04 PM
 
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How about for teachers that have the same scenario but in a secondary school setting? Do the strategies mentioned above still work?
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