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Spedteach29
 
 
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This parent is killing me.
Old 12-07-2019, 05:17 AM
 
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I previously taught prek sped and had a student with me for 3 years. He has ADHD but is extremely gifted academically. This year I transitioned to primary sped so I have him on my caseload as a kinder student. This parent was always super difficult and nothing ever pleases her, but itís gotten so much worse this year. This kid needs reminders to focus and attend, but other than that has no behavioral issues or learning difficulties. She constantly emails demanding a 1:1, demanding a daily sheet so she knows what heís doing all day (which weíve done), upset if someone doesnít remind him to put his hat on before he walks outside, upset if he falls in the gym and gets a bump that no one was protecting him.

Ahhhhh. Iím so over it.

His iep meeting is next week and I just know it will be a battle. At what point do you stop accomodating the parent when the student doesnít need it?


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teabreak teabreak is offline
 
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Data
Old 12-07-2019, 11:59 AM
 
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I would say itís all in the data for this parent. If you have the data to show the child is fine academically, then it really canít be disputed.

As for the reminders, again data. Show mom how many times Jr. is reminded to attend to task and the results of that. Also remind mom that kinders are forgetful and kinders fall down. This is normal development. If she is that worried, then perhaps learning at home would be better in those areas, but Jr. wonít progress as quickly socially if he is isolated.

You could also offer Velcro to keep the hat on the head and bubble wrap for playground time
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IEP mom
Old 12-07-2019, 12:14 PM
 
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Parents have two conflicting jobs - protecting their kids and helping them grow.


It sounds like she's stuck in the "protecting" part, and having a hard time letting him grow. Try to be ultra reassuring that many of the things he's doing (like falling, or forgetting his hat) are common to all kids his age! Make sure she knows she's still a good mom if she lets him learn the hard way that when you forget your hat, you feel cold.
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Old 12-07-2019, 12:16 PM
 
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When is his reevaluation? Will your P/sped director back you up?

It sounds to me like the child shouldn't even be on an IEP. I would probably move up the reevaluation and do as much testing as you possibly can- formal cognitive, formal academic, social/emotional, etc. That way you have tons of data to share and parent can't say there's other data they need to see. Even if there is an official ADHD diagnosis, there has to be an educational impact in order to get an IEP for it. Otherwise it's a 504 and could be not your problem . Having hard data to prove he doesn't qualify for an IEP is going to be a lot easier than "denying" accommodations/services that parents want as part of an existing IEP.

If your admin is supportive, I'd pull them into the meeting and like the pp said, make sure you are prepared with data to show what the child does and doesn't need. I'm sure your admin doesn't want to pay for a 1:1, so that should be denied pretty quickly. And I'd try to get parents to sign consent for a reeval- "It sounds like there are a lot of questions about what this student really needs to be successful. How about we reevaluate and make sure we have all of the information necessary to best understand his needs?"
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Old 06-12-2020, 11:00 AM
 
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The only thing that I would suggest you trying is to keep data this way you have proof of his academic work. This would be a good thing to have when it comes time for his ARD. For the reminders, you can also keep data or maybe make a reminder chart posted on his desk.


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MissESL MissESL is online now
 
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Wellllll
Old 06-12-2020, 11:35 AM
 
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Usually our sped person says something along the lines of: “I’m sorry, but ____’s testing and evaluation data doesn’t support a need for that accommodation. These are the accommodations we are able to provide.” And simply repeats variations on the theme if a parent persists.
It helps that we do believe that any accommodation that will support the student should be used, but some accommodations limit a student’s independence. “Sped” doesn’t mean “totally incapable of anything,” and it’s important to help parents realize in as nice a way as possible that you need to stretch and challenge students to help them grow.
It’s annoying when I hear it as an educator who knows my student, and I’m sure it annoys the parent...but in this case, the immovable refusal to humor the parent is super helpful!
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Hope this Helps
Old 07-30-2020, 07:10 AM
 
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Hello

I would suggest taking data on offering services in which he refuses/declines help. For example, if the student is playing a game in PE, I would ask my assistant to ask him if he needs help. If he declines give it a tally mark and if he says yes mark that as well. This is evidence that services were not needed. The thing is IEPs are based on Data not what the parent wants but rather what the student needs.

Also, I would write a goal about independently requesting help. He may start with a model, move to a visual cue and finally independently.These would be my objectives.

Your goal as a teacher is to foster independence not coddle students and their parents.

My goal would literally say,

Within 36 instructional weeks,given reminders, the student will independently request help in various classroom situations in 4/5 opportunities. I hope this helps. Sweetgirl2020
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