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weather question
Old 01-22-2019, 02:20 PM
  #1

Please forgive for my ignorance, I live in Texas. I want to know how yíall function with all that snow? I mean do people stock pile food? What about personal that have to drive, like doctors, nurses, police officers? What about shoveling your driveway? What if it snows while your gone? Can you get back into your driveway? Sorry curious minds what to know... lol


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Old 01-22-2019, 02:26 PM
  #2

Iím in IL. We donít consider anything less than 5Ē worth discussing. Iím 42 and have never live through a storm bad enough to stockpile food. We shovel our driveways and we go about our business. Iíve neber had it snow so badly I couldnít get in or out of my driveway. I think snow and ice are just a part of our lives. We bundle up and we deal with it.

But I am having someone snowblow my driveway tomorrow am soo donít have to get up early and do it. Iíve discovered I enjoy that.
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Old 01-22-2019, 02:30 PM
  #3

Where I live in New Hampshire we rarely get more than a foot or so at a time. I live a mile from grocery store and I almost never lose my electricity. People have snow blowers or get their driveways plowed or shovel them themselves. People will still go and basically clog up the grocery stores buying bread and milk just in case, but there's never been a storm since 1978 that I couldn't get to the store by the next day. People in more rural areas than me often have generators in case the electricity goes out, and they might stock pile a little more food just in case.

The Blizzard of 78 we got three feet of snow in Massachusetts( Boston area) and were stranded in our houses for 2 weeks before the plows came through. We lived three miles from the Town Center . We had neighborhood potluck dinners after a few days and people cross-country skied to the store to get food. That storm was a real mess! Cars were abandoned on the interstate and buried with snow and it didn't get cleaned up for many days.
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Life goes one even with snow
Old 01-22-2019, 02:31 PM
  #4

We shovel continue to go to work, to grocery shop, etc. Shoveling the driveway is a pain, but you can always park on the street while you shovel the driveway and then pull in. My big pet peeve is the snow that the snowplow leaves on the driveway -- it's so heavy.
Schools here, in Central Ontario, Canada, rarely close for snow -- the last day they closed for snow was 20 years ago. Buses do get cancelled at times, but the schools remain open so teachers must get to school We had a bus cancelled day yesterday because of extreme cold. I only had 7 of 19 students show up, so we didn't do anything new, lots of fun review games.
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Western NY
Old 01-22-2019, 02:33 PM
  #5

We just got a big storm, but we knew about it well in advance. I made sure that we had extra water and food. I went shopping on Thursday and the storm was expected on Saturday. We made sure we had gas for the generator and diesel for the tractor (plow). Our snow crews kept the roads plowed as best they could. Not many people were driving Saturday night into Sunday. Hospital workers planned on staying an extra shift.

We have a tractor and use it to plow the driveway. If it were to snow during the day, while I was at work, I would try to get the car off the road and into the driveway (using momentum). Then I would trudge to the door. Hubby would plow when he got home.

We got about 15 inches and everything is so pretty!


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snow
Old 01-22-2019, 02:34 PM
  #6

Snow if just part of winter. It could snow any day and usually does. Sometimes plowable sometimes a nuisance. Everybody drives, some better than others. You just need to go slow and focus! I do get anxiety when I have to drive in the snow, but I just do it. There are snow plows and salters/sanders that keep the roads safe. Sometimes they reduce the speed limit on highways to 45 if it's really bad.
We shovel and plow our driveways. We wear winter boots and dress for the weather. Kids love it!
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Old 01-22-2019, 02:37 PM
  #7

Many people plow/shovel gradually. If it's going to snow a foot, you don't want to wait until it's over. There was one time when I truly couldn't get out and had to do some major, major shoveling and wait for the plow. We are prepared for it, so the plows are relatively good (compared to Texas! ) and try to get out early and keep up. Sometimes it's a mess and it's better to stay inside if you can.

We had a big snow over the weekend. Friday afternoon I stopped at the grocery store. It was packed with people getting ready. No need to stock pile if you have a day's worth of food, but it was mainly people who didn't want to go out on Saturday in the snow (or people like me who wanted snow day treats ).
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Surviving winter
Old 01-22-2019, 03:18 PM
  #8

Well, first of all people who live in snowy areas know how to drive in the snow. Things such as not accelerating or braking suddenly. Steering into a skid. And there are snow plows for the streets. Half a foot of snow here can be less of a problem than half an inch in the South. I think we got about 8 inches Friday night into Saturday and our sidestreet was plowed by early afternoon.

When weather reports predict lots of snow (like over the past weekend), many people do a grocery run for bread and milk--but realistically that is seldom necessary.

Most people have snowblowers, but many just shovel. If we need to get to work after a snowstorm, we get up early to shovel. The difficult part can be the end of the driveway after the plow has gone down the street. That snow can be packed and heavy. A few hire someone to plow their driveways.

There have been a couple of times when we have been away during a snowstorm and had to shovel the end of the driveway in order to be able to pull the car into the drive. Usually, you can just drive through and shovel later. That's life in winter.

And the snow is so pretty.
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Snow
Old 01-22-2019, 03:53 PM
  #9

Lol! I live on the shores of Lake Ontario, so we get crazy lake-effect snowstorms. This past weekend, we got over 24" of snow, and nobody was really even fazed by it.

Most people do have snowblowers, or they do their own shoveling. Since I'm a 5'3" wimpy woman with a family history of heart attacks, I don't shovel any more than my front porch steps. I hire a plow company, who plows my driveway anytime that it's over 3". While one guy plows the drive, the other guy jumps out of the truck and shovels the sidewalk from the driveway to my house (front and back doors!), as well as from in front of my garage. It costs $20 a trip, which is wildly reasonable around here. If it snows while I'm at work, and my driveway hasn't been plowed yet, it's never so bad that I can't drive through it. I have an all-wheel drive vehicle. My plow guy also knows that my driveway must be done by 7:00 a.m., and he has never failed!

Where I live, every town has an army of snowplows and salt trucks at the ready. They work day and night to keep the roads clear. Doctors, nurses, etc. can usually make their way to work on a main road, even if it's slow-going.

As far as food is concerned, I think that people do tend to keep a better supply at home during the winter. But when the forecast calls for a storm, you'll find the grocery store shelves completely cleared --- especially of milk, bread and eggs lol! For this past storm, we were shopping Friday night, and the store was also completely out of frozen pizza and ice cream!
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Old 01-22-2019, 04:08 PM
  #10

I grew up in Detroit winters and I can't recall snow days. My papa and probably 3 other guys on our street had plows. My papa had a contract with a few nearby businesses (supermarkets and a couple smaller stores and a gas station) to plow their parking lots. Snow really isn't the issue--it's the ice, especially black ice. As TAOEP said, we know how to drive in it. But there's always some yahoo who thinks 4WD means he can drive like a demon.


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I have thought about this a million times.
Old 01-22-2019, 04:20 PM
  #11

I don't think I would be able to function in that kind of weather. I would just want to curl up in warm pajamas for the whole winter. I can't imagine having to shovel snow before going to work in the morning. If we get even the smallest amount of snow here in South Louisiana, the whole state shuts down.
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Old 01-22-2019, 04:56 PM
  #12

Yes, if we get snowflake Texas goes crazy. The whole town shutdowns for ice, schools are usually canceled. I just saw on the news so much snow this past weekend and wondered if life still kept going? It seems it does, I guess itís kind of the same here. I have to pay 40 every two weeks to have my yard mowed, my grass grows like crazy and I hate yard work. It usually slows down in the winter, but last week had to hire someone.
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When you're used to it, it's no big deal
Old 01-22-2019, 05:04 PM
  #13

I live in southern Wi and we're getting 5-10 inches overnight and into the morning. That's the perfect storm for those who want a snow day because many city/town plows don't get to the side streets until the snow stops. This means a greater chance of schools closing or at least delaying for 2 hours.

Ds is in high school and has his last final exam tomorrow morning at 8 (if there's school). He said the principal told them that if school is closed tomorrow the final exams for that day won't be made up. I think that's crazy! I also think that even high schoolers can hear what they want to hear when the principal is talking!

Since high schoolers only have one exam and elem. and middle school only have a half day, I bet they end up closing our district.

I also am old enough to remember the Blizzard of 1978. We were without electricity for at least 10 days. We were fortunate enough to have a wood burner in our living room and a gas stove in the kitchen. We listened to our battery operated radio, played games and made sure neighbors were ok. I was only 10, so I remember it with fondness. My mom always canned fruits and veggies and we always had a freezer and refrigerator full of food. I maintain that habit even though I really don't have to.

A lot of hospital personnel stay overnight at the hospital if there's room but when you have a job like that, you know what winter will bring.

And what's with people running out to get toilet paper?!?! My God, I buy those huge packages of toilet paper when I shop so we always have PLENTY. I assumed everyone bought the big package.
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Old 01-22-2019, 05:10 PM
  #14

I live in the boonies, so my regular grocery shopping might be considered a stockpile to some. We would be able to stay put for a month, no exaggeration. We would run out of milk. Otherwise, we’d be good.

My district shuts down for snow often. We have mountain roads that never see sunlight. Today we were out, but there was no snow at my house. DH’s district doesn’t miss as much.

Most of the snow we get is in the 1 to 5 inch range, which was even easy to maneuver in my cars. Now I have a full-size pickup truck, so it hasn’t gotten to the point where I don’t go if needed. I don’t like to drive in snow, so I usually won’t. People who have to drive in it usually don’t think much of it. My mom’s boyfriend is from Minnesota. Snow doesn’t keep him home. Ever.
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Old 01-22-2019, 05:35 PM
  #15

I guess I have a unique perspective because I lived my first 30 years in sunny CA and then moved to upstate NY where it snows a good amount. I also moved from a city to a very rural area.

I had many of the same questions you have Mia, so I can relate!

I did have to learn to drive in the snow - my DH taught me. I also always switch to snow tires in the winter. I drive a manual - stick shift - which I think helps. I used to have an AWD car, but to be honest, my front wheel drive does as well. Just don't go too fast on snow covered roads!

I love that as a teacher, I have a snow day if the roads are too bad.

We do stockpile food - like Ima I could probably go a month except for milk and fresh veggies. I think the stockpiling comes from my DH growing up here and living through much worse blizzards.

We have a wood stove, gas cook stove, and a generator. We lose power a few times a year and have to hook up the generator.

We plow and snow blow our driveway.

As for going out in it, you just have to bundle up and dress appropriately.

And I do spend plenty of days in my jammies in front of the fire watching movies too.
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Old 01-22-2019, 09:13 PM
  #16

Like others said, it's all relative. My home town's average yearly snow fall is less than 10 inches. There, pretty much anything that sticks to the streets results in a delay or snow day and people stay in. My friends out here think that's absurd.

Yesterday I checked the weather before bed and saw 5-8 inches with "blizzard conditions" in the morning. I suspected that wasn't enough inches for a snow day and I was right. Honestly the roads ended up being fine. In my hometown, that kind of forecast would result in everything shutting down and people hunkering down to watch coverage of "snowmegeddon 2019."

I still don't like to drive in snow. I drive very slowly and let people pass me. I also try to avoid braking as much as possible- I slow down waaay before I need to stop so that I can come to a gradual stop without having to brake much. I also purposefully bought another AWD car when I was recently car shopping.

If things are truly atrocious- we'll get a snow day, but they have to be really bad. I've had two snow days in my 9 year teaching career. Sometimes if I think there might be a snow day, I'll go to the grocery store and get some yummy snacks to enjoy on my day off just in case. Of course more often than not, there ends up not being one. I've certainly never been in a situation where you need to stockpile food- again, we'd just drive in it.

I live in an apartment so I've never had to worry about shoveling. I don't have a garage, which I hate . If we've gotten a significant amount of snow the night before, I'll go out and uncover my car so it's at least less to deal with in the morning.

Before living here, I lived in the mountains for a couple of years and the constant snow was one of the reasons I hated it. I'm talking feet of snow every couple of days, and yes we were expected to go to work in it. I honestly don't know how I managed to never get in a wreck living up there. Everyone else there loved the snow because it meant good skiing weather. I was in the very small minority!
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Old 01-23-2019, 03:49 AM
  #17

You know itís funny. My sister and I have talked about this that for people who move to our area and experience the first major storm must be like what is going on?! I live just outside of Boston and grew up here so snow is just part of life. But for example, in boston people shovel out their street parking then put a space saver like a chair etc. to save their spot. There are all sorts of traditions and rules about this. But if you were new to town youíd just be confused. Lol.


But yeah Iím just used to it. As far as grocery shopping all the stores are mobbed leading up to a storm. I either just deal with the crowds or make do with what I have in the house. Iím honestly not afraid of driving in the snow so Iíve been known to go food shopping mid- storm. My dad taught me to drive on a rear wheel drive car in New England winters and now I have a 4wd vehicle so Iím fine with it.

I do hate shoveling. This is honestly a reason dh and I donít like to go away in the winter bc were afraid of it snowing and us not being here to clear it ( were nuts I know). We just bought a brand new snow blower so snow removal hasnít been so bad.

Iíll probably get a handful of snow days due to the weather. Which is great!
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Old 01-23-2019, 10:14 AM
  #18

I live in the suburbs, but they do the same thing with saving parking spots with chairs in Chicago. I have spent most of my life living in the Midwest and am used to it.

However, in 1999-2000, I lived in Charlotte, North Carolina for a school year when I got my first teaching job. That year it snowed there for the first time in 4 years, 3 times in one week. All prime time television was interrupted for 24/7 coverage of the snow storm of the century. One whole inch that the newscaster talked about like it was 3 feet.

The first snow of the season happened the Tuesday after MLK day. I left the house that morning to head to school and noticed a dusting of snow. On the way to school, I heard on the radio that my school was closed for the day. The teacher who was supposed to call me forgot. This was before the days where everything was listed online. I never thought anything of the snow on the way to school since that amount would never close anything in the Midwest. The following week, a couple more inches had parents coming to pick up their kids early from school, and the school closing for the rest of the day.
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Snow issues
Old 01-23-2019, 11:43 AM
  #19

We live near the coast so when we DO get a big storm (6 plus inches) it melts fairly quickly. Even if it doesnít, the roads are plowed and salted and ready for travel fairly rapidly. As soon as the snow stops, we just go about our day. We joke about running out for milk and bread if even a few inches Iíd predicted. The stores get crazy right before a storm. I did live through the blizzard of 78 and that was insane. We walked about 10 miles to replenish food. Our car was dead until it thawed out. We walk outside for exercise year round. If you have the right clothing, it is no big deal. I have lived here in New England all my life. I grew up driving in snow. No big deal! I usually think of all the skin cancer I am NOT developing by not living in year round sun. Ha ha. I cannot imagine what my skin would look like if I was beaching and boating 12 months a year!
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Snow
Old 01-23-2019, 01:11 PM
  #20

I live in a rural area. We get well over 120Ē of snow a year. We donít shovel our driveway. It is plowed. If it snows when we are gone, we just drive in as far as we can and plow out around it. Iíve never gotten so much snow that Iíve gotten stuck.

I donít stockpile food before a storm. Iíve never been stuck at home more than 24-48 hours. With better technology, the plows are more efficient at snow removal. Back in the Blizzard of Ď66, my dad said they were stuck at home for a week. My in-laws said it took 2 weeks for the plows to make it through and they had to go out the upstairs window because there was that much snow. I personally have never seen more than 36Ē fall during a storm.

I always say Iíd rather live with the snow than worry about my house blowing away in a hurricane or tornado. Hurricanes up here arenít much more than a rainstorm and tornadoes are few and far between because of our hilly terrain.
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I've lived in many places
Old 01-23-2019, 02:31 PM
  #21

In TN and KY - snow pretty much shuts everything down. The powers that be simply don't have the snow plows and salt available to clean it up quickly.

When I lived in rural MO - snow would also pretty much shut things down since the rural areas were not on the county's priority list to clean the roads. We would stockpile food and supplies, but with the closest grocery stores 45ish minutes away we did that regardless of weather.

Now I'm in suburban OH. We got about 10" this past weekend. School was closed Tuesday mainly due to the temperatures since the district has a number of kids who walk to school. However, we were out and about Monday inspite of the snow thanks to the county's snow plows and salt trucks.

So while I know people make fun of the south's reaction to snow, having lived there I understand it because it really does inconvenience life.

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