This information makes me realize that I am not as dumb as I sometimes feel - ProTeacher Community




      
Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Teachers' Lounge


This information makes me realize that I am not as dumb as I sometimes feel

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
jazzer jazzer is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,762
Senior Member

jazzer
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,762
Senior Member
This information makes me realize that I am not as dumb as I sometimes feel
Old 08-13-2022, 11:55 AM
  #1

It is silly, but sometimes I feel inadequate because I only have a bachelor’s degree and did not get a masters degree.

My husband read an article today that said that only 35 percent of US adults have a four year bachelor’s degree. It also claimed that 50 percent of the US adult population can not read above a 6th grade level.

I guess my mere bachelor’s degree is not bad since 65 percent of adults don’t even have that.

I remember when I worked as a newspaper reporter years ago before I started teaching, I learned that I needed to make my articles simple and at a third grade level because that is where the majority of readers were at. It made me feel better to know that as someone who minored in journalism and was writing the articles, I was definitely above that level.

I guess another point is that just because a person does not have a bachelors degree or masters for that matter, does not mean he or she is not intelligent enough to get one. There are many factors that cause people not to continue their education such as finances or life circumstances.

I guess I will remember all of that that next time I am around a group of people who all have masters degrees and I have to think about my mere bachelor’s degree.


jazzer is offline   Reply With Quote

PEPteach's Avatar
PEPteach PEPteach is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 12,898
Senior Member

PEPteach
 
PEPteach's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 12,898
Senior Member

Old 08-13-2022, 12:04 PM
  #2

Life isn't easy. I often wonder if I'll be able to navigate everything on my own (taxes, retirement finances, home ownership, etc.) And then I think about the added challenges others have - not speaking English, not having parents who can "coach" you on your first major financial decisions, single parents, less education, etc. I truly wonder how others do it and I have a lot of respect for those who thrive in adulthood with greater obstacles.

I also remember when we got a new superintendent about 8 years ago. He talked a lot about how the college degree is losing its value - how it's more about critical thinking, people skills, etc. I don't know how I feel about that, but I do believe there are many more opportunities than before for people without a college degree.
PEPteach is offline   Reply With Quote
Summerwillcom's Avatar
Summerwillcom Summerwillcom is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 3,478
Senior Member

Summerwillcom
 
Summerwillcom's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 3,478
Senior Member
Degrees do not relate to smarts :)
Old 08-13-2022, 12:19 PM
  #3

Quote:
I guess another point is that just because a person does not have a bachelors degree, or master for that matter, does not mean he or she is not intelligent enough to get one. There are many factors that cause people not to continue their education such as finances or life circumstances.
This is very true!
I grew up surrounded by Drs, lawyers, PhD's, and scientists. Some were very knowledgeable in their field of study, but did not always know other
important things.
I have known very intelligent mechanics, plumbers, and electricians.
They can problem solve, see things others can't, and often amaze me. (I am not skilled in these areas at all.) I have been dealing with a lot of them this year because of home sales and building.
A lot of them have common sense too. They figure out ways to fix things in a practical way that does not cost an arm and a leg.
Maybe because I was raised around people with higher institutional education, I was able to see their strengths and weaknesses. So I never put them on a pedestal. A degree is a piece of paper that you can get if you have the money, time, and desire.
So never feel bad if you don't have a higher degree. You can learn just as much as a teacher having a BA, working, and learning on the job. An MA just bumps you up on the pay scale!
Summerwillcom is offline   Reply With Quote
cvt's Avatar
cvt cvt is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 11,097
Senior Member

cvt
 
cvt's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 11,097
Senior Member
degrees
Old 08-13-2022, 12:30 PM
  #4

Thank you for this perspective. Years ago I had a housemate who was in the PhD program. She invited me to a party in her university department. I was surrounded by PhD students and felt completely inadequate with my lowly master's degree.
cvt is offline   Reply With Quote
NJ Teacher's Avatar
NJ Teacher NJ Teacher is online now
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,252
Senior Member

NJ Teacher
 
NJ Teacher's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,252
Senior Member
Advanced degreesÖ
Old 08-13-2022, 01:21 PM
  #5

For the first 12 years of my career, I taught in a rural district. The way the contract was structured, you were paid for every course you took beyond your bachelorís degree on the pay scale. There was a column for masterís, but I had no idea what I wanted to get it in, so I took grad courses that interested me. By the time I left that job, I was earning more than if I had my masterís.

When I came to NJ, the contract was different. I had to earn a masterís, or I would be frozen at B+15 credits on the salary guide. Once I got tenure, I enrolled in a masterís program at a state college near me. The program was awful and I learned very little, but I was able to eventually move to the top of the guide at B+45 credits.

Do you feel judged by others because you donít have a masterís? Some of the best teachers I know never got their masterís. For me, it was motivated by increased earning capacity and earning more towards my pension. In a group, I donít even think I would know who had a masterís and who didníít, and intelligence definitely has nothing to do with it.


NJ Teacher is online now   Reply With Quote
calumetteach's Avatar
calumetteach calumetteach is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,267
Senior Member

calumetteach
 
calumetteach's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 2,267
Senior Member

Old 08-13-2022, 01:38 PM
  #6

There are all kinds of ways to learn and grow and a degree isnít always necessary. I know a lot of people who are tradespeople and others with professional jobs. My best friend has no bachelors and she is really smart because she reads and is curious. She is also people smart which I think is more important than a PhD. I worked hard as a teacher Öit wasnít always easy for meÖand was in awe of teachers who were naturals. Also, I have my masters and donít think it makes me any smarter. I learned so much from others and just the trajectory of education and good inservices I attended.

I would feel out of place with people who have PHDs as well but only because maybe they have different life experiences? I travel, but not widely and I love the arts, but am limited to what I can do.
calumetteach is offline   Reply With Quote
GraceKrispy's Avatar
GraceKrispy GraceKrispy is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 43,958
Blog Entries: 1
Senior Member

GraceKrispy
 
GraceKrispy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 43,958
Senior Member

Old 08-13-2022, 01:38 PM
  #7

My spouse doesn't have a bachelors degree. He was talking with a friend of my mom's one day early in our marriage. This friend had a PhD. He told my mom afterwards how simply delightful and smart he found my dh. That turned my mom's thinking about him around a little.

No one should feel inadequate based on their level of education. Although I have a higher degree than my spouse, there are many areas of knowledge where he is hands-down far brighter than I.
GraceKrispy is offline   Reply With Quote
FionaJ's Avatar
FionaJ FionaJ is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,968
Senior Member

FionaJ
 
FionaJ's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,968
Senior Member

Old 08-13-2022, 02:00 PM
  #8

Great points, jazzer.
FionaJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Tiamat Tiamat is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 2,214
Senior Member

Tiamat
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 2,214
Senior Member

Old 08-13-2022, 02:50 PM
  #9

I never finished high school - I was out in the full time working world a week after I turned 15 (the minimum age for leaving school at that time). I was accepted to University in my 30s as a "mature age" students (over 25) and my education degree is the same as anyone else's.

Just occasionally, though, the high school thing comes up. We were once asked at a PD on "your pathway to education" (just as silly as it sounds) to put our hands up if we were the first in our family to finish high school. There was a great derailment of the discussion when I elbowed my daughter in the ribs and told her to stick her hand in the air.

She also did Uni as a mature age student, but she had finished high school.
Tiamat is offline   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 11,035
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 11,035
Senior Member

Old 08-13-2022, 03:01 PM
  #10

I've heard the youngest generations are now rejecting the "everybody goes to college" idea. I think that's a good thing, personally. I remember when I was in HS, we had it hammered into us that the ONLY way to be successful and make money was to go to college. We were encouraged to do that even if we didn't know what we eventually wanted to do.

That's simply not true. Most "trade" professions (plumber, electrician, mechanic HVAC, etc.) make great salaries (significantly more than teachers) and are always in demand. On top of that, they didn't have to pay for college in the first place! Student loans are also very predatory. In many cases, people will be paying for those their entire life when possibly the degree wasn't even really needed or wanted in the first place.

I personally only got my MA for financial reasons. In my first district, they gave a tiny, not worth it stipend for having one, so I never pursued it. When I ended up in my current district, I realized I needed my MA to move up on the pay scale. I got mine through a really easy, bottom-tier school that was the cheapest thing I could find. My BA was actually significantly more rigorous.

At the time, I was a little embarrassed of where I went for my MA and didn't feel like I could be "proud" of the degree. Part of me wished I'd gone to one of the more reputable local universities. Now that I'm several years removed from that situation, I don't regret what I did at all. It would have been really financially stupid to pay 5x more just for "bragging rights." HR doesn't care where my MA came from, and I've made significantly more over the years by having it.

I actually also got my +20, and then +40, also for financial reasons. Our new contract actually makes it even more lucrative to move over, so I'm motivated to go for +60 now.


Haley23 is offline   Reply With Quote
cvt's Avatar
cvt cvt is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 11,097
Senior Member

cvt
 
cvt's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 11,097
Senior Member
college
Old 08-13-2022, 04:33 PM
  #11

Quote:
Most "trade" professions (plumber, electrician, mechanic HVAC, etc.) make great salaries (significantly more than teachers) and are always in demand.
This may be true, and I agree that college is not for everyone. However, I feel that I didn't really learn critical thinking until I was well into college and took advanced courses. I was what they euphemistically called a "returning student" when I went back at 38. I went to a highly-rated university and realized then how limited my thinking had been regarding so many things, including politics, health and relationships. I'm afraid we are seeing a lot of that today with people accepting sound bites and memes in social and mass media without deciphering the information and gathering perspectives.
cvt is offline   Reply With Quote
WordFountain's Avatar
WordFountain WordFountain is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,136
Senior Member

WordFountain
 
WordFountain's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,136
Senior Member

Old 08-13-2022, 06:55 PM
  #12

Welp, I only have a BA *and* I went the alternate route for teaching *and* I worked 12 years in a charter school. To some that checks boxes to be looked down upon but I donít care. I love teaching and know itís my calling and passion.

I hope Iím not coming off as snarky. Iím just tired and blunt. Iíve enjoyed reading PPs perspectives regarding this topic.
WordFountain is offline   Reply With Quote
cemsnowy4's Avatar
cemsnowy4 cemsnowy4 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 990
Senior Member

cemsnowy4
 
cemsnowy4's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 990
Senior Member

Old 08-13-2022, 07:17 PM
  #13

I understand what your saying that having a bachelorís degree is what makes you smart. Unfortunately in todayís time if you donít have it you canít get some high paying jobs. I agree that electricians and the trades you need to be smart as well but it plays a huge toll in your body. They work very hard! I am encouraging my kids to get degrees so that they have more options and opportunities.
cemsnowy4 is offline   Reply With Quote
jazzer jazzer is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,762
Senior Member

jazzer
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 6,762
Senior Member

Old 08-13-2022, 09:18 PM
  #14

Thanks for the interesting perspectives. Funny that my husband has a masters degree and I never felt intimidated by that. He got a C average in high school and was only in the top half of the class, whereas I had a B average and graduated in the top quarter of my class. He is smart though. He did much better in college than he did in high school with a high B average. I sometimes had a B average and sometimes a little less. He attended a small college in the 70ís and I attended a big university in the 80ís. Neither of us is smarter than the other despite our experiences.

I have also learned that I can not really compare myself to people who attended school in a much earlier time because things have changed in education so much over the years. I realized that now as I think about how growing up I felt like I had to do as well as my parents did in high school and college. Everything they did seemed perfect and I felt like I could never measure up to what they accomplished. However looking back, I realized that academics were probably less stringent in the 50ís when they went to school than they were in the 80ís when I did. They may be even more stringent in the 2020ís.
jazzer is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Teachers' Lounge
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:11 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net
13