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Retired teachers?
Old 11-17-2019, 05:44 AM
 
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I am in my second year of retirement and subbing for my school district. If it werenít for retired teachers, our district would have very few subs. How many in this community are retired teachers that continue to sub for their district?


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Old 11-17-2019, 05:02 PM
 
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<Mooba raises her hand>

Even with retired teachers making up most of my districtís subs, we still have a sub shortage. Iíve been subbing for the last 8 years, and this year Iím getting group emails from schools desperately looking for subs. This past week alone, I got 4 of those emails, receiving 2 on Friday.
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Certified teacher substitute
Old 11-17-2019, 07:14 PM
 
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I've been retired for 4 years now. I subbed for my grade level colleagues my first year and also volunteered with the math program. It was the first year of a new math adoption and believe me, it was a huge learning curve for all of us!

But after the first year, I just felt it wasn't worth it. The daily rate for a certified sub is only $65/day. When our school district went to a 4-day week, the school day lengthened accordingly, but substitute wages did not reflect the longer day. No wonder our sub pool is so shallow!
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Old 11-18-2019, 08:37 AM
 
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There is one district where I am that relies on retired teachers for subs. They pay regular subs $90.00/day and retired teachers (from the district) $125.00/day. Retired teachers from other districts make the same as regular subs.

I don't see too many retired teachers working as subs, they are mostly at the secondary level.
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Nearly 5 years
Old 11-18-2019, 06:49 PM
 
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I sub in my old middle school and at the high school. I could work every day. I've jokingly told teachers that they are going to have to put out bids for my time. In Illinois, they are so short of subs that applicants need to pass background checks, have a high school diploma and take a 7 hour course/pass the test to become subs. My district pays $90 a day. As a retired teacher who actually TEACHES when I'm in the classroom, I can only work 120 days a year. Other subs don't have that restrictions. Last week, I had three teachers request me for the same day. I was already working. It's crazy. I ended up covering for two teachers at the high school last week. Luckily their classrooms are next to each other. I'm planning on one more year, although when I renew my certification, I will have five more years. If the district would recognize retired teachers' value by paying a little more, I might continue. As is, I will run out of days somewhere in March or April. I love subbing and teaching. But not when an inexperienced 18 year old could sub for the same money.


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Old 11-21-2019, 09:16 AM
 
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I have found that having my credential makes it where I don't have to jump through the hoops that others do. That makes it a LITTLE better.

If I found out that retired teachers were being paid more, simply because it is their district, I would quit. I would feel really weird subbing at the school I worked at (high school), which is why I didn't go that route. Luckily I'm not desperate for work, but I've never even heard of that before I read that, today.
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Old 11-21-2019, 09:48 AM
 
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In my main district they can sub for an unlimited number of days. Frankly, I think it’s unfair because they take the best jobs and work at the schools with the least discipline problems and never have trouble getting booked. They also hog the majority of the high school jobs.

This district also hires a lot of subs. There are currently 75 plus subs just in my license area alone. It makes it really hard to network or even get jobs where I could actually teach in my subject area. I run into this problem in a few other districts, but they have a capped number of days. If it wasn’t such a pain in the ass to get booked, I wouldn’t care as much.
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Old 11-22-2019, 10:34 AM
 
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The cap on the number of days a retired teacher can sub is probably in place so the district can't take advantage of them. That's what I would guess. We don't have that restriction. 120 days seems like a lot, to me. I'm just trying to get in my 40 days this year to get to the highest pay rate, of $160/day. I think I'm on day 25.
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Old 11-22-2019, 10:45 AM
 
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In California, you have to have a 4-year degree (in anything). I agree with that because I think students should be around people that value an education - it seeps through to them. It is good role-modeling, even if it is difficult sometimes.

I also think that that people that have done the work to get their credential should get paid more, but I think we should ALL be paid more. We really do need a union.
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Old 11-22-2019, 11:34 AM
 
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Quote:
. If I found out that retired teachers were being paid more, simply because it is their district, I would quit
Well then you wonít be subbing in my old district. It is a high performing district and they prefer the retired teachers. For the first 12 days I work, I get regular sub pay. After that retired teachersí pay is upped $25 a day. Plus, they give me a check for $25 x 12 ( for the first 12 days.) Most of the retired teachers only do planned absences or requests. So there are still plenty more of sick days regular subs can cover.


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Old 11-22-2019, 01:31 PM
 
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I can't blame schools for preferring retired teachers, and paying them more, but for the pay to depend on the district they retired FROM, I have a problem with that. Maybe I wasn't clear.
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Another retired teacher here!
Old 11-23-2019, 11:10 AM
 
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I retired 2 years ago, in Dec. 2017. Since then I have subbed, but in a neighboring district. My home district wants subs to be available 3 days per week minimum. Too much for me!

The district where I am working requires only 3 days per month. I generally do more than that - maybe 10 or so days... basically working half-time. Also, I take extended time off for travel or family obligations. I took a week's vacation in early November, and I am taking all of December off because hubby is having extensive surgery, and facing lengthy hospitalization and recovery. I'll do a long term sub in Jan - Feb to make up the time.

I love subbing. Those of us with teaching credentials get $100 per day, and regular teacher's salary for long term positions. It's not a fortune, but it keeps me out and about and active.

Many threads here are full of complaints about bad conditions, but I have never experienced any of that. Spending day with the kids gives me joy.
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@Fractured
Old 12-04-2019, 09:37 AM
 
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We had quite a few here. Some of them taught me while I was a student in the district. A lot of them were nice people, but man I could vent for days about how the district prefers them to such an extent that it forces out up and coming substitutes trying to break into teaching.

edit: This turned out a lot longer than I thought it would when I started. Bear in mind that I have nothing against retired teachers as people. I had most of these people as teachers growing up and harbor no dislike for them. The bitterness in this post is more aimed at the district's favoritism and how unfair it all is -- something I hope I've made clear in the rest of this post.



Quote:
Frankly, I think it’s unfair because they take the best jobs and work at the schools with the least discipline problems and never have trouble getting booked. They also hog the majority of the high school jobs.
It's a similar situation here. It made starting out extremely difficult for the first two years (!) because assignments were rarely available through the traditional website since secretaries and absent teachers would just ask their retired teacher friends personally if they wanted the gig before even throwing it in the system for everyone else. These people also tend to grab long term assignments through word of mouth first, even when they're less qualified to teach the subject long term than another substitute who specialized in that field while earning their bachelor's/master's in the subject. For example, they've let retired coaches come in and long term sub math/english classes indefinitely before letting a guy with a math/english degree even apply for the position.

I could go on for days about this. It really hindered me when I started out, and it took years to finally get over that obstacle through sheer brute force. I wouldn't wish it on anyone, and I feel really bad for new subs in our district, because in my case at least, I was writing my name and phone number on the end of my sub notes for years before it finally started paying off. My first and second year was just a series of never hearing back from anyone, ever, because when they needed work they'd go straight to the retired teacher they'd worked with for years prior, and I'd get stuck sitting around looking at my phone in the morning waiting for those last minute "car broke down" "son is sick and I have to stay home" kind of calls. Which obviously makes sense, but man does it suck when you're new and just trying to find work so you can pay your bills, and the jobs straight up won't appear in the system at all.

There are three retired teachers I can think of off the top of my head who aren't even that good at their jobs, but they keep getting all this great work anyway. One, a former history teacher who hogged a long term English assignment for several months after the district miraculously found a way to keep him in longer than the maximum time limit (when he finally walked away from it, they got a guy with an english master's degree and kicked him out after the maximum allowed 6 weeks, putting forth no effort to extend his limit; then they recruited me, with my B.A. in the subject and kicked me after six weeks as well -- because apparently protocol exists unless it's for your friends!). Another, a long retired elementary school teacher who gets daily work in the easiest high schools, despite virtually every student and staff member telling me that she rarely follows lesson plans left by the teachers, veers the entire class off topic by obsessing over minor things like a student trying to go to the bathroom, and generally holds the class back a day every time she's around by going on tangents about her personal life. Literally had teachers remark in confidence that they were glad they got me that day and not her, because I teach/follow their instructions. Yet when it comes time to dole out the long term work, she got first dibs every time, by some random miracle. Another, who gets so much of the middle school work that their school's jobs rarely even enter the system, and when they do, they often miraculously cancel themselves after a day, as if the district remembered that it wasn't supposed to give others a chance to get their foot in the door.

The icing on the cake was when former teachers I'd had as a student would approach me in the halls or in the office, brag about how much work they were getting in what I felt had been a pretty dry month, make sure to tell me that they were "just doing it for extra spending money" and then saunter off to some long term gig about a subject they'd never taught before and didn't study, that I specialized in and was never even given a chance to apply for. It really drove home the idea that someone who's basically just doing this to add to their pension income is getting more pay and preferential treatment over someone who's relying on this job to survive and is arguably more qualified for the long term assignment they'd been given. I don't even know if they were being truthful about those comments, but it still sucked to hear nevertheless... since I'm doing this to pay rent and they're taking jobs just because (their words).

Bear in mind this is just within the scope of my district. I don't have like, a blanket dislike for retired teachers. I just dislike my district's unfair system and how it favors retired teachers significantly. There were a LOT of these retired teachers when I started, and the district's favoritism made it borderline impossible to find work until I got a phone app and started sniping jobs the second they appeared in the system, before they could get sent to callout. Apparently a bunch of their retired teachers vanished last year and now this district is having a really hard time finding people to sub for them because they spent the last god-knows-how-many years alienating new blood with rampant favoritism. Jobs just sit in the system now. I do believe a big part of it also has to do with pay and the disparity between how teachers are treated/compensated and how substitutes are paid far less and treated like garbage, but I think another aspect, in this district at least, has to do with all that favoritism finally coming home to roost.



On a bit of an unrelated note, lots of these retired types here were coasting on tenure before they finally retired, and they bring that lax "can't be fired" attitude with them into the classroom when they sub. I see it when I sub in their classes before retirement, and I see it when I wind up picking up the pieces after they get first dibs on a long term assignment and then vacate it after months of wasting everyone's time. It shows. Had paras comment on it as well, saying they were openly rude to students, sat in the corner teaching nothing, weren't versed in the subject, etc. but someone in the office thought they were a perfect fit to lead the class for months anyway, and then someone else in admin jumped through hoops to extend their stay. I'm a little bitter on this subject, if you couldn't tell. I wouldn't mind at all if most of them did their jobs, but so many of them here don't even try, and then they get called back the next day for more work.
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Old 12-04-2019, 10:25 AM
 
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I have to say that a "high performing district" has more to do with the clientele than the skill of the teachers.
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