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sadcoach
 
 
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Team teacher not teaching comprehension!
Old 04-23-2018, 09:14 PM
 
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I was talking to a co worker the other day and I brought up the fact that our school needs to do Curriculum Mapping for next year. I was shocked when she responded very negatively to it and basically told me Curriculum Mapping is a waste of time. I tried to explain its importance to her and other teachers supported my argument. I was then asked to review teachers' daily schedules and lessons to help create a master schedule for next year. As I looked over said teacher's schedule and lessons, I found out that she has not explicitly taught ANY reading literature, reading informative text, speaking and listening standards all year and is picking and choosing what she teaches in regards to the language standards. When I pointed this out to her, she told me she had "taught" those standards during read alouds. I tried to explain to her how that's not really teaching but just mentioning the standards. She disagreed and told me "I don't teach standards, I teach students". What do I do next? I care about her students and don't think it's fair that she is keeping them from learning comprehension, speaking, listening and language.


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what's more important?
Old 04-23-2018, 10:19 PM
 
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I would focus on my own class. Make suggestions if you must, but be professional about it if you do. People in general don't like criticism. Me personally, I would focus on my own students. You're right, but it is her business. I would let her learn from her mistakes on her own. She is ignoring a lot of the curriculum. She is an adult, so let her figure it out. Also, teaching is subjective, and many of these current trends in education are not flawless. But your colleague IS doing less. It sounds bad, but she will eventually have to deal with it.
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wait till you're
Old 04-24-2018, 03:02 AM
 
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Quote:
tried to explain to her how that's not really teaching but just mentioning the standards. She disagreed and told me "I don't teach standards, I teach students". What do I do next?
I hope that you didn't say this to your colleague in these words. I would be put off by this but it's not like it's something to make a big deal out of. I like that you're talking shop and it does open to collaboration. I'm just wondering if this kind of change is more along the lines of thinking like an administrator. I don't think that it's negative idea to discuss. And we know the nature of change.
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Your name implies that you are a coach
Old 04-24-2018, 04:23 AM
 
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Your name implies that you are a coach, so I would do what your administration asks, make a master schedule, present it when you meet with the teachers, review each component of it, and leave it up to administration to see fit how to handle this teacher.

If she is an experienced teacher, she's probably doing all that you mentioned. Experienced teachers know that there are many different ways to teach the standards. What experienced teachers don't like is that they are micromanaged to jump on the bandwagon of some approach that has a different label and micromanages a specific way in which standards "must" be taught.

On the other hand, experienced teachers know that they are hired to teach as the district micromanages them to teach. As a coach, you might want to discuss with your principal, the possibility of all of those teachers in that grade level observe other teachers in their grade level and other grade levels teaching reading as your district dictates. That way this teacher won't feel threatened by being singled out, and she and other teachers will see the methods in action. You could possibly get subs and take that whole grade level to another campus to see teaching reading in action. That was a common practice in my district when new methods were introduced.

In my opinion, the effectiveness of reading coaches depends a lot on how you approach the teachers and how you word things in your conversations with them.
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Old 04-24-2018, 04:24 AM
 
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I took it from OPs name she is a literacy coach so thatís why sheís making suggestions and worrying about the teacher.

I would say just document exactly what you discussed and itís up to her to implement or not and up to administration to evaluate her teaching.

Anytime I meet with a coach or someone like that they write conversation notes and we both sign. Something to think about in the future?


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Old 04-24-2018, 04:42 AM
 
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Well, I disagree.

If you think you have a sub-standard teacher who is not teaching the curriculum and the result is a poor education for her students, you have a responsibility to speak up. Especially if you are working in some leadership capacity at your school which your post seems to indicate. Tell her mentor/her administrators that you have concerns and what they are. Ask if they will follow up.

Administrators should know what's going on in every classroom in their school, but often some don't. It's our job to protect students. We don't throw fellow teachers under the bus, but we don't protect bad ones either.
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Coaches are pawns
Old 04-24-2018, 05:21 AM
 
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Face it, you probably don't know nearly as much as you think you do. Administrators use coaches to push the newest methods that soon become the methods that didn't work.

Someday, before you know it, you'll have people coming to tell you that you're doing it all wrong.

"Other teachers supported your argument" That sounds really divisive. How about just going along with the Curriculum Mapping and if she engages, she does, and if she doesn't, she doesn't.

It's a Codependency issue when we have to have others agree with us. Let it go and don't cause trouble for her.

Don't run to your administrator whatever you do. You are not her superior and that would be extreme troublemaking. Maybe you should wait until testing is done and then compare apples to apples and see how it all works out that way.

Data can prove that she needs to do something differently. Not an argument that your way is the only way.
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Teaching comprehension
Old 04-24-2018, 07:44 AM
 
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As I coach, you sometimes climb a slippery slope. Here's my experience:

I was a fairly new teacher and was offered all the training to be a literacy coach. Jumped at the opportunity. Also, I was on very good terms with the P.

A veteran teacher signed up for coaching. Long story short, she was using me to make herself look good to P. She was nice as pie and asked the right questions, but once I left, she never did anything remotely close to the program.

After many weeks, P asked how it was going in that teacher's room. Young, naive me told the truth. It got back to the teacher who, of course, started talking behind my back. A lot of ugly stuff. I stopped coaching her.

Fast forward many more years...I ended up working directly across the hall from this teacher and she was once again nice as pie. But I never trusted her again. Oddly enough, she would tell me all sorts things that clearly informed me she was still an ineffective teacher.

Moral of the story:

1. Admin knows who the inadequate teachers are.
2. You never know when you might have to "live" with these teachers again.

I suggest you do your map, and she either uses it or doesn't. Admin will know.
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Data
Old 04-24-2018, 08:07 AM
 
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Let the data do its job. If this teacher is not teaching the required grade level reading skills this will show up in her student data.

I teach ELA in a middle school setting. We have required colaborative meetings where we analyze data and work on curriculum mapping together. Our curriculum coach provides professional development for us. This seems like your next step- providing professional development and helping your teachers develop usable curriculum maps. Focus on what your teachers are doing right, provide encouragement, and promote team building for the most positive results!
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Old 04-24-2018, 10:44 AM
 
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Let the data do its job. If this teacher is not teaching the required grade level reading skills this will show up in her student data.
This is the most professional way you can handle the situation. I would hesitate before you mention specifically to the P about your coworker's failings. Use test results and coach to those weaknesses.

The P will know who the weak teachers are in your school. It's up to the P to address and deal with those specific teachers. As others have said, you never know who you'll need to count on in the future.


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