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Electronic devices
Old 07-28-2013, 07:25 AM
 
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Just curious--are cell phones, iPods, etc. A problem at your school? Do you have a school policy?


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Old 07-28-2013, 09:53 AM
 
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My school has always had a policy of no electronic devices. However, this year they are going to allow them to be used to gather information from the internet. I don't know how I'll be able to make sure all of my students are on task. Also we were told that if a student didn't have a device to allow them to work with a student that did.

All I can envision are a bunch of kids on twitter/facebook or taking photos or videos during class.
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Old 07-28-2013, 10:34 AM
 
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Kids are allowed to be on their phones during lunch and before the first bell rings in the morning.

What teachers allow the kids to do with them in the classroom has been left up to the teachers. Some collect them. Some just don't want to see them.

I view it as a battle that I don't want to fight because I won't win. They are way too attached to them.

My policy is that I don't want to see them or the kids to be on them while I am talking. If I see it, or they have buds in their ears, or hands under the desk or in their hoodie pockets, the iPod/phone becomes mine and they can come back and get it at the end of the day.

If they should be working and they are playing, the iPod/phone becomes mine and they can have it back at the end of the day. Someone will be on their phone for a quick tweet and I'll ignore. It seems like some of them have a serious need to tweet every five minutes (or less).

l think iPods have increased productivity from some of my kids by 90%. Once I'm finished talking and they are working, they stick the headphones on and it blocks out all the other kids and they just work.


The classroom dictionaries suck (to put it nicely). They often look stuff up. And I know some of them are on Twitter or facebook or playing but I think the benefits outweigh the drawbacks.

After the first week of school last year, I think I collected 2 phones and one iPod that was out when it shouldn't have been. And that was from 2nd hour kids, so they had to go the whole day without them.
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E-devices
Old 07-28-2013, 03:49 PM
 
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Cell phones could be carried but were not allowed to be used except after school. They would be confiscated if seen or heard at any other time. Ditto with iPods. That was my school wide policy as of this past year. The concerns were privacy, testing, and distraction. That said, within a teacher's classroom, the teacher had discretion *if* an electronic device was specifically used to support instruction. An example would be when my students used their cell phone cameras to take pictures of work on the board, or to look up information at my direction. I did enforce the rules otherwise. The device would be put deep in my pocket and go directly to security during my passing period, to be picked there up after school. Second offense, a parent had to come to get it back. I always stated the rules up front, and gave reasons why which they mostly respected and very rarely tried to argue. One reason to control the use of cell phones is the camera.......you don't want to end up on U-Tube like one teacher in my school did, and it was NOT a flattering video. He was let go after that year.
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we allow cellphones
Old 07-28-2013, 05:30 PM
 
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Our policy is similar to the one at Platypus's school. Our students can use electronic devices in the hallway and at lunch. They can use them in the classroom if the teacher permits it. The idea is to let the students use their devices for academic purposes. However, I have seen very few kids use it for academics. I hate the policy. A lot of the kids think that because they are allowed at school they can use it whenever they want. Last year, I had trouble with the phones. Yes, I told them they couldn't use them, but it didn't stop kids from trying to sneak and do it. So, I designed a log sheet. The first time they use the device without permission is a warning (I write their name down for records) and the second is a write up.

I agree with Platypus that I do like the headphones/ipods. I allow them to listen while they work on independent work, such as writing. It keeps many of them on task (how music blaring in your ears does this I don't know) I much rather them listening and writing then talking and not working. My biggest problem was the phones and trying to facebook and what not.


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Old 07-29-2013, 02:48 AM
 
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Our students can use their phones/Ipods during passing times and at lunch. It is up to individual teachers after that.

All sophomores have Ipads and juniors/seniors will have chrome books this fall.

Last year the Ipads were new...so we battled the games and snapchat.

My theory is as long as they are attentive and not using during the lecture/learning time that they can use them afterward.

I have taken away several...some for the day some for the class period..torture!

"But Mrs J it was my mom!"
"I don't care if it was Santa Claus"
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Cell Phones
Old 07-30-2013, 10:23 AM
 
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The kids were not supposed to use them during school hours but they all did. Teachers were supposed to take the phone and bring it to the office if seen. Most didn't. Taking a phone was a possible battle that just wasn't worth it. Cell phones were like alcohol during prohibition. Illegal but widely used and the laws were mostly ignored. For the most part kids used them responcibly. There was some texting and facebooking during class but it wasn't overt. Most kids responded well to my quiet " put the phone away before I see it". Heck, I always had my phone in my pocket too

I loved and encouraged ipods. It was so much easier for my kids to concentrate on individual work when plugged in. It blocked out all the other distractions and kept chatter to a minimum.

I did have to disable Digital Dropbox in my Blackboard account. 5 of my guys had downloaded World of Warcraft from home and were playing on school computers during study hall. While a little annoyed, I had to admire their ingenunity.
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cell phones
Old 07-31-2013, 05:22 AM
 
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Most, if not all of my students have cell phones and I think it is unreasonable to take something that is SO much a part of their everyday (every minute!) experience and take it away from them when they enter our school. I do, however, want to control how it is used in my classroom; my time with my students is just too precious.

We use cell phones from time to time and I encourage my students to download the dictionary.com app, the next draft app and other apps for news, and I love to use the polleverywhere for quick polls and surveys.

Kids need to learn HOW and WHEN to use devices appropriately. It is up to us to teach that skill.
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Old 08-10-2013, 07:28 AM
 
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I sub in 4 districts. All have their policies, which most of the regular teachers ignore. As a sub, I usually don't come in and change what the teacher has been doing. As long as they get their work done, I'm okay with it even though I'm not crazy about it. I've even got out my phone and let them google stuff for their assignment.
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Subs: tough call
Old 08-11-2013, 10:51 AM
 
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Back when I was a sub, I took pretty much the same approach: I'd adhere to the teacher's stated instructions/routines as closely as possible. Where the plan was silent on a point, I'd very firmly adhere to the published school rules. This frequently caused conflict with students, as they would claim, "We're always allowed to do x, y, or z." My policy was, if an exception isn't explicitly stated in the lesson plan, I'm sticking to the letter of the law; take it up with your teacher when he or she comes back.

I once (as a sub) got my wrist slapped, though. A teacher had left the instruction, "Students may listen to headphones during the silent work period." Fine. Kids were working, headphones were on. No problem. Well, an AP stuck his head in the room to check how everything was going. He glared at me, horrified, demanded to know why kids were listening to their iPods or whatever, and bellowed at them to take off the headphones and put the devices away.

After class, the AP stood there and read me the riot act about letting kids listen to music when it was against school rules. He was unmoved when I said it was in the lesson plan. He said, "I don't care what the plan says! You got a list of school rules when you arrived this morning! If you ever get a lesson plan that conflicts with school rules again, bring it to me and show me so I can deal with it, but you don't get to ignore the rules! You're creating a headache for me and every teacher in the building who's trying to maintain discipline!" He then demanded the lesson plan, yanked it out of my hand, frowned down at it, and took it with him to the office.

To add insult to injury, the next time I was back in the school, several teachers gave me the cold shoulder, believing I had tattled to admin on the teacher I had been replacing (apparently she got a reprimand also when she got back). They felt I shouldn't have told the AP about the lesson plan and just pleaded ignorance and taken the reprimand myself and left it at that. Still pisses me off.


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