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Mesha1857 Mesha1857 is offline
 
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I'll be teaching Reading to below level 9th and 10th graders!
Old 07-06-2014, 05:23 PM
 
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I'm moving from third grade to high school. I will be teaching Reading to below level 9th and 10th graders. I'm not sure how to set up my 45 minute blocks. I will have 5 periods throughout the day. I'll appreciate any help I can get. Thanks!


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Old 07-07-2014, 03:37 AM
 
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3rd to high school? That's a big jump! Are you excited?

What do you know about your students? What are their reading levels? Is this a special ed class or a regular ed remedial class? Do you have a program to follow? Those things will make a big difference in how you set up your class.
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Old 07-07-2014, 01:15 PM
 
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I'm super excited! My district adopted Collections by Houghton Mifflin this summer. It is a new curriculum. I watched the intro video. It seems pretty interesting.I was encouraged to use the new curriculum. I do not know the level of my students yet. My classes are regular remedial classes.
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Big jump
Old 07-09-2014, 06:08 AM
 
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You have made a big jump I will tell you that most 9-10th graders do not do the cutesy thing and don't like to feel different from their peers. I'm guessing that most of your students will struggle with some higher level decoding and comprehension. If I were you, I would get an assessment of them before you get started. This would be to make sure you are teaching what they need. Does your new curriculum have an assessment?

Also, you could break items up into sections. You could teach how to read nonfiction (such as textbooks) for the first month or two and focus on that. This is what they will be reading for school anyway. After that, concentrate on how to read informational text and so on.

I can't really think of any other ideas at the moment without knowing what your students really need.
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Old 07-10-2014, 01:56 PM
 
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I'm not sure if the new curriculum has an assessment piece. But I'll look into it. Thanks for your help!


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been there myself
Old 07-12-2014, 08:09 AM
 
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My experience with students of this age who have reading difficulties is that it is a hard row to hoe. Hopefully you will have some literature that the students will have an interest in. This kind of student is not crazy about reading already. I agree with the previous poster who said you can teach nonfiction--this will be the reading the students prefer most likely. I used to find articles on the internet about current events a la Kelly Gallagher (whose website is interesting and useful as well as his books). I used Gallagher's articles or something else and I used his approach to having the students respond to the articles. I always place a great emphasis on vocabulary aquisition. I would make a powerpoint of 4-6 vocabulary words from our shared reading. First the word and part of speech appeared. I'd have the kids write this down and have a short class discussion to guess what it meant. Kids preferred to skip this and sneak on their phones to copy a dictionary definition--watch out for this! These kinds of kids are not always used to putting themselves out there. They don't like to get answers wrong. I always emphasize that correcting inaccurate ideas is powerful learning. I would present the sentence from the text in which the word appeared so the students can guess further about the meaning. I had the kids jot down their guesses. Finally, I would present the definition. This definition was not always precisely out of the dictionary. I strove to make the definition really clear. I sometimes used Scholastic's children's dictionary versus one you might find in the classroom. An online dictionary is quick to use too but you still might need to clarify the definition. Once we finished the vocabulary lesson, and the kids filled out the graphic organizer with the word, part of speech, guess, and actual definition, They would write sentences with each word used in context. I also taught them to use capitals and end punctuation (low readers are often poor writers too) as well as make the sentence 10 words or more long. It was easy to grade the sentences for a quick assessment of understanding.

I also made little card games with definitions that were worded a little differently than what they had in their notes from the powerpoint. They would play this matching game with a partner. Some students would be fast finishers on this (usually 10-15 words), but others really struggle because they are not good readers. Once they got a few right though, the rest usually fell into place.

I would also give them a crossword with still another version of the definition (synonyms maybe) to complete with about 15-20 words. I am a firm believer that the students need to encounter words several times to really begin to own them. Finally, I would create a vocabulary quiz. Usually the kids did pretty well on the quiz after encountering the words so many times.

Besides reading something as a class and all this vocabulary study, The kids had to read for 15 minutes on their own every day and journal after. I sometimes gave them a stem to use to begin the journal (20-30 words per day was my requirement, but some kids went for more and quite a few struggled to compose 20 words). The stem would be something like "I predict" or "A character is like me because...". The purpose of the stem would be to help them use some critical thinking because mostly they would summarize what they read or say they didn't know what to write about. You can do some modeling here.

I also strove to teach things like Greek and Latin roots and stems, fluency, and strategies.

This year I will teach middle school intensive reading. I will use the strategies I have written about here, but I'm also going to try some of Corbett Harrison's ideas about vocabulary aquisition. I hope you will check him out too. I'm looking forward to the kids making vocabulary graphic organizers to display on the walls. I hope to read about your success and failures here so I can use some of your ideas. Good luck!
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Old 07-12-2014, 06:06 PM
 
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You have a lot of great ideas! I'm planning on focusing on vocab and reading skills. I was told to really push the reading skills for my students. I haven't made any real decisions yet. But as soon as I do, I'll share with all of you. Thanks for your help!
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Old 07-15-2014, 09:18 AM
 
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I would teach in the manner you teach the younger students, but make sure to hit the interest level of the older students. They are low because they don't care and are unmotivated. So that will be your hardest challenge. I subbed lots of students like this this year. If you can get them to do the work and build up their confidence that will be half the battle too.
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Old 07-16-2014, 01:24 PM
 
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I'm looking for novels now that will interest them. Everyday I'm on the internet looking for lists of high interests novels. Thanks!
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Old 07-16-2014, 01:30 PM
 
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I'm looking for novels now that will interest them. Everyday I'm on the internet looking for lists of high interests novels. Thanks!


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High interest novels
Old 07-21-2014, 11:23 AM
 
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I suggest the Bluford series. They address issues of interest to students such as peer pressure, romance, gangs, and other contemporary issues. The reading level is not very difficult. Plus the publishers will supply you with online and downloadable resources for free.
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Old 08-01-2014, 11:37 AM
 
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Thanks! I'll look into the series.
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Novel
Old 08-03-2014, 04:05 AM
 
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Tears of a Tiger by Sharon Draper is a great novel for low-level students. It is written all in slang dialogue, so the kids love it. I taught it with a remedial English class of students on 3rd-5th grade reading levels. They loved the book!

I second the poster who suggested the Blueford series as well.

Two great short stories by Evan Hunter are "The Last Spin" and "On the Sidewalk Bleeding." Both stories deal with gang violence. I actually got the idea for one of these stories from the Freedom Writers Movie.
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Old 08-05-2014, 07:12 PM
 
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I would make a question page for them to fill out the first few days of school to see where their interests lie. Then I'd come back here and share and see what people have to suggest. They have to feel like they have some say in what they learn. That is what I've seen with the lower students. Otherwise they will tune out.
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Frayer Model Note cards
Old 11-18-2014, 09:12 AM
 
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Frayer model note cards are another way to learn vocabulary.
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