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1styr=lastyr
 
 
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Quitting my job
Old 03-30-2012, 03:39 AM
 
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I have decided to quit my job. Well, technically I'm not "quitting" I'm just not going back next year. This job isn't enjoyable, I dread going to work each day, and it is taking a toll on my health. DH and I decided that we can do without the money for now. Sad part is, I'm a first year teacher. I knew it'd be hard, and I'm not afraid of hard work, but I didn't know I'd be so unhappy and stressed. My only support is retiring this year, and honestly I don't know if I could make it through each day without her, as the others I work closely with are just dreadful. I hate that I went to college for nothing, but I just feel like the best decision for me is to not return next year. The only reason I haven't put in my notice already is for the kids, and also I don't want to burn any bridges. I want to have the opportunity to go back in the future, just in case. I don't really know what I'm asking for from this post... maybe prayers to get through the last couple months?? Also, the few select family members I've told about my decision say to wait until the school year is over to let my principal know. They're scared she'll be upset and give me bad evals, etc. Do you think it's best to wait until the end of the year?


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Old 03-30-2012, 03:56 AM
 
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If there is notihnig you have to sign about returning the following year at this time, I would wait.

Don't give up on teaching. The scholl might not have been a good fit for you. You might also be able tofind a part time job.

When you do give notice, do not give reasons about the job. Say it's a personal decision.
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Yes, wait.
Old 03-30-2012, 05:24 AM
 
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In the meantime, I would start looking for other positions. Districts around here are starting to look ahead to next year, etc. Also, I was hired with 3 weeks until school started in my dream district. It was a trickle down of a medical leave of a principal ironically which left a classroom open. I had interviewed for a different position that went to a much more qualified applicant, however I guess I made an impression because I was called immediately and offered the job.

My first year was awful. I hated it, I was sick, I was miserable. However I didn't give up on teaching, just that school. The kids were rough, the parents were rough, the administration tried, but it wasn't enough. I felt unsafe to be honest.

Can you attempt to transfer in district? Is there possibly a school closer to home that might be an option?

Keep looking and don't give up! But definitely wait.

Illini
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Old 03-30-2012, 05:37 AM
 
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Good luck to you. I have no advice but made a decision similar to yours after five years in public school. I think leaving without burning bridges is important. I know I will go back. I.had a bad time because I was too tender hearted, a perfectionist, and a people pleaser in a job that is impossible to truly be perfect and no one is ever pleased( or it felt that way) and trying to be perfect and get 100% of everything expected of my done, on time, and perfectly to everyone's liking took hours and hours and hours, meaning I saw my kid an hour or two a day. It is impossibly hard to do and be everything that is expected. I need to reprioritize and come in with a game plan to truly work to serve others, even if imperfect, and to accept that I can still guide, love, cherish, help, and serve while being good to myself and my family. It is weird, but I think I will need counseling in order to work that job. It is a calling, therefore important, a passion( still think about teaching all the time) but not an easy one. It is especially hard on the super sensitive.


Good luck. I do hope stepping awsy can help you find where you can best serve the world. Most teachers have " servant's hearts" and simply want to see they are helping humanity. If it is not teaching, then I wish you the best of luck finding where you truly feel you impact the world.
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Old 03-30-2012, 05:43 AM
 
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I would wait...this year I switched schools and I am a bit sad...I am going to stick it out...I work with great people , kids, and families are wonderful but the demanding amount of time is really throwing me off balance. I am hoping it gets better. hang in there and don't give up. Like a previous poster said it could be that its not a good fit...Good luck


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Old 03-30-2012, 06:01 AM
 
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I agree to hold off telling the principal for as long as possible, while looking for other jobs ASAP. You can always may like something came up during the summer that allows you to not be able to return & that's the only explanation you need to say.

Itruly hope you find happiness somewhere else!
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I would wait...
Old 03-30-2012, 06:05 AM
 
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Just remember that schools are all different, too. My first three years were like a dream. Amazing principal, amazing team, great students, very well-organized district.... Even though I was in a state testing grade, there was more emphasis on good teaching and enjoyment than the pressure of the test. When I got married, I decided to switch to the district dh worked in, which was an hour away and paid about $10,000 more per year. I was confident because I had three successful years under my belt. I interviewed at two schools and both offered me jobs on the spot. (insert inflating ego). So I accepted what I thought was a dream job. I would be teaching reading all day to 3 different classes, 3rd, 4th, and 5th.

I will spare you all of the details, but fast forward a few months, and I was crying every night. Near anxiety attacks, and I have always been a low-stress, roll with the punches kind of person. The principal was awful, my partner who I sanded kids with was a mess and it affected my class, the support staff were rude (I, a teacher, got yelled at on the first day of school for letting my class get water from the water fountain after recess on a 90 degree day). Later learned that recess was a no-no as well. The district was poorly managed. There were ridiculous expectations on what we needed to have on our walls, in our lesson plans, etc... Everyone was at work past 6pm every day and came in on weekends just to get everything done. People were miserable. I was at the end of my rope and was searching for waitressing jobs. A position opened up at another school in the district and I was granted a transfer mid year. It saved my career.

I can honestly say that had that school been my first teaching experience, I would have fled from the profession and never looked back.

Now teaching is a stressful job, but it doesn't have to be miserable. If teaching is what you feel called to do, and I truly believe it is a calling, then if there is an opportunity to try another school, I would. Try a new school or district next year and see if you feel the same way.
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Old 03-30-2012, 06:10 AM
 
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I agree with the others to just wait until the end of the year to turn in your resignation.

Being a first year teacher is hard! We have all been through it and it does take its toll on you. I remember my first year. I cried a lot and thought that I wasn't cut out for this profession, but it does get easier with time. I know times are different now than when I first taught. There is a lot more stress from every direction now. Just don't give up on the profession all together. If you need time off or need a different school, do what you need to make yourself happy.

Good luck!
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Old 03-30-2012, 07:26 AM
 
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Another point is that your degree isn't wasted even if you never teach classroom again. There are many related jobs, and you should spread your net farther and check those out.
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Old 03-30-2012, 08:08 AM
 
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Give teh required notice. That is all you need to do. You never know what might happen inbetween.

You did not go to school for nothing. You have that degree and will always have it. You can also do a TON of other jobs that require a degree but aren't even in the field of teaching. Once you recover from this year you might look into other things such as local family coalitions that teach parents and kids - many grants require someone w/ a degree to admin them and you'd get to help kids still! also jobs w/ the health dept and cities often require a degree but they don't necessarily have you do related duties such as accountant, food inspector, supervisors and such. AND the bonus is you would probably make way more money.

Its okay to still be finding out what you want to be. That degree is very valuable. Your journey is just a longer road. It will be okay.


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Old 03-30-2012, 08:21 AM
 
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In the end you have to do what is best for you....It is hard being independent. B Seems we celebrate & relish in the good but dwell & have regrets over the bad. Best of luck to you in your decision. Take care!
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Old 03-30-2012, 03:08 PM
 
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Thanks everyone. I appreciate the advice, and the reminder that my degree wasn't for "nothing." I honestly haven't had a "bad" experience... like there haven't been any big stressors or events or anything. This year has just been a constantly unhappiness. I just feel like there is this looming cloud over my head all the time because I'm constantly "behind." I may look into a private school to try something different. Changing to a diff public school I don't think would make a difference... I'm at the "best" school in town (They saw that because we live in affluent neighborhood I guess) and I have great parent support. My admin is a bit disorganized but nothing too drastic. Like I said, it's just been a constant pain... Kind of like a dull throbbing instead of a broken leg.

Anyway, thanks for the encouragement. I will look into another branch of teaching one way or another.
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Old 03-30-2012, 05:56 PM
 
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Don't say anything yet. I agree that you also might want to give it another chance. I was so stressed my first year, anxiety attacks, the works. I have now been teaching for 29 years and I love what I do. The very first day of my second year was sooooooooooooooooooo much easier! I am not telling you that just to encourage you, I am being very sincere. My boss during my last year of college (Chick fil-A) told me that I had to give teaching a second year. No one can judge anything by their first year teaching. He was right. That school also has become like a second family to me. I changed schools nine years ago and I still have regular contact with several of them, we send each other birthday cards, Christmas greetings, etc. I honestly wouldn't give up yet.

Nancy
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You might consider
Old 03-30-2012, 10:30 PM
 
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letting your principal know if you decide to apply for other jobs in a different school. Principals call each other and yours will be contacted if you apply elsewhere. The new principal may not like it at all if you haven't informed your current principal. But don't resign or check the not returning box on the year end notice until the deadline.

As others have said, the first year is beyond expectation and it does get better. But you seem to be in an inappropriate setting (sometimes financially poor schools are wonderful places to teach, I've loved most of mine) and might want to look for a better fit. Not sure how to word that for a principal you are leaving.

You do, indeed, have a college degree and a bright future, perhaps in another field, perhaps as a teacher. You will certainly be a parent with an understanding of what the classroom is like!
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Old 04-01-2012, 05:59 PM
 
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If you quit there's always the option if grabbing a long term sub job if you don't get employed full time. Sometimes that can be a great stepping stone.


When I read this: "I'm at the "best" school in town (They saw that because we live in affluent neighborhood I guess) and I have great parent support."


I feel there is something else you are not telling us.
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Old 04-01-2012, 08:09 PM
 
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I'm so sorry you have found teaching to be so hard on you. I should add that you are not alone. Statistically, a huge number of teachers gives up within the first 5 years of teaching. I suppose after that, it somehow gets more tolerable. It doesn't get necessarily easier (notice some old timers' comments here), but at least lesson planning can sometimes be less of a chore. Meanwhile, is there another new colleague you can befriend at work?
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