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SubMan SubMan is offline
 
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Sneaky
Old 11-24-2019, 09:06 PM
 
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I recently found out that one of my districts has quietly hired building subs.

The way they are working this is by having long term subs do day to day subbing before or after their long term assignment. One paper (school board minutes) it appears that the long term sub is in the assignment for the entire year.


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Ima Teacher Ima Teacher is offline
 
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Old 11-25-2019, 05:39 PM
 
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Why is it an issue for them to have building subs?
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Old 11-26-2019, 12:37 AM
 
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The issue is not that they have them but instead the sneaky way they were hired. This district is always asking subs to cancel jobs at other schools. Those that were hired are newer teachers, none of those hired were long time subs.
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Aillya Aillya is offline
 
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Old 12-04-2019, 01:45 PM
 
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They do this here, and it makes me a little mad tbh. Virtually all long term assignments in this district happen through word of mouth, meaning there's not an application process or anything. In other words, the most lucrative jobs don't usually go to the most qualified person for the job. There's a whole pool of actual math majors who don't even get ASKED if they want a long term math job, for instance, because a well known sub who maybe retired from the same district 5 years ago, or is married to a teacher who works there, or is really good friends with the office staff, got handed it on a silver platter before it even entered the public eye. And then, on top of that, this person also gets handed day to day work leading up to the day of their long term job, so that anyone else who has to pay bills gets screwed out of that work as well.

It's a positive feedback loop for one person, and a negative feedback loop for newcomers who want a foot in the door. Often, the mere act of being at a school creates more opportunities to work in that environment in the future. If you're at a school every day, odds are you'll be approached by staff members about working other days in the future. You might even get approached for a long term job if you're around often enough and are able to network. This never gets to happen for a lot of people when districts stack the deck by loading up preferred individuals with lots of work while alienating everyone else except on the absolute worst days when absences hit a critical point. Of course, this practice has the consequence of pushing people away from your district because they feel like there isn't any work to be found there. Then when your preferred people inevitably quit because subbing sucks and nobody does it forever, you're all left wondering why there's no one to cover your classes and how this could have possibly happened. Saying this as someone who gets regular work, not even as a bitter outsider. Handing "favorites" building-sub jobs on top of long term jobs is akin to giving one person dinner and dessert while letting somebody else starve without either. It's gross from a fairness standpoint, and it's bad for your district overall. Watching it happen right now in this one. They loaded their favorite people (not even from a quality standpoint, but from a "friends with admin" standpoint) with the best jobs for years, and now that all those people have finally left, they're getting really desperate and putting jobs out into the sub system and wondering why there aren't enough people trying to do this for a living.


And of course this is to say nothing of the actual hiring process for becoming a full-time teacher. Out here at least, subbing doesn't even lead into full-time teaching. It's basically a dead end job that goes nowhere. If you want to teach, there's a separate path you have to walk that has nothing to do with substituting. So it makes sense that they'd hire outside their general pool of subs. But it's still so silly to watch, when someone with no experience in a classroom outside of their student-teaching time gets a full class to themselves and a sub who's been in classrooms for five years and long term taught for a combined total of a full school year is told they're not qualified. Like, okay lol.
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Old 12-05-2019, 10:04 AM
 
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I have to say that this is totally true at my school. It is a small district, only one high school. I ONLY work at that one high school. I told the secretary that if I could work just one or two days a week, I would only work at that high school. I am actually on the sub list for another district, but I turned off their phone calls, since I'm working enough where I'm at. I like it there. Calls RARELY, if ever, go through AESOP. When I check out she'll give me other jobs, or call/text me at home.

She offered me a long-term job in a subject I knew absolutely nothing about, so I turned it down. Actually, I don't do long-term jobs, not even 3 days in a row, because of bad experiences, anyway. But she did offer it to me.

Keep in mind that it is easier for a busy secretary to simply ask me to cover a job than going through AESOP, especially if I'm already on campus that day. More than a few times she called the class I was subbing in to ask me to work a different day, also. I get requested some, but most of the time I think it is just because I'm available and easy to book.

I don't see subbing as a way into teaching, at all, especially if you don't have a credential. I always applied on edjoin. I don't know why others think that just because you sub at a school that you'll be hired to teach, there. It would be quite a coincidence that a job would open up that would coincide with a sub's background. It is a job to make money while you search out a teaching job. It doesn't hurt anything, of course, but I think subs give it too much weight. A credential in the subject means much more than somebody who is a daily sub at a school, even if they're well-known. The probably wouldn't even get an interview.

The number of teachers in a school without proper credentials is public record. Even a credentialed teacher, if not in their field, is public knowledge. Schools would much prefer to hired a properly credentialed person over a sub, even if the sub has more actual teaching experience. Experience can be gained. IMHO, subs should work to gain their credential at the same time they are subbing. That is the best way to end up in a teaching job with tenure. IMHO. That's my experience, from someone who has been both a teacher and a sub. Teaching and subbing are two very different jobs. I don't see simply subbing as a way to being a teacher.



Last edited by bodhimom; 12-05-2019 at 02:09 PM.. Reason: correcting grammatical errors
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