Teachers quitting the profession - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      The VENT

Teachers quitting the profession

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Kathcha's Avatar
Kathcha Kathcha is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,609
Senior Member

Kathcha
 
Kathcha's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,609
Senior Member
Teachers quitting the profession
Old 01-15-2019, 09:20 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I have heard and read that record numbers of teachers are quitting the profession and some systems have been having trouble getting teachers. I don't know any personally that have done so and so haven't heard that and the inner city schools where I did guidance counseling, (I'm now retired) don't seem to be experiencing teachers quitting. The teachers I do know say that conditions have definitely gotten worse as far as the student behavior, parents going against the system (even lawyers about grades) and things like administrators and teachers not being allowed to touch students, no hugging either. This is sad for staff and alarming for vice principals, usually the disciplinarians, how in the world does that work? They need to break up fights, etc. It seems if they do, they end up in public humiliation on the news. My daughter will be trying to return to teaching when her youngest starts school and it's been difficult to get a job for years. Maybe now a shortage is in the future which seems sad. I know that math and science people can definitely make much better money in other professions and of course ALL teachers need to be better paid, who can live on the first steps of a contract or support a family? I believe the teachers starting out are probably more likely to be quitting.

If it's happening in your district, What are the reasons you have heard? Money? Student behavior? Administration? (the reason I finally burnt out and retired) Other?


Kathcha is offline   Reply With Quote

NJ Teacher's Avatar
NJ Teacher NJ Teacher is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 8,752
Senior Member

NJ Teacher
 
NJ Teacher's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 8,752
Senior Member
Not happening too much in my district...
Old 01-15-2019, 10:12 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I taught in an affluent suburban district. Getting a job there is a goal of many applicants. I personally have not seen a lot of teachers quitting, but they talk "tongue-in-cheek" of being jealous of those who can retire, and some of them talk about working 25 years and getting out and possibly doing something else. I taught 42 years, and do not see that type of longevity for a lot of my colleagues.

The reasons are many. The hours that the job takes take up a lot of time. Many people are married with families, and it is increasingly difficult to find a balance. The raises have stalled. While I made a great salary on paper, a lot of it was taxed away and the cost of living in my state is high. Legislation was put in place to take a high percentage of the health care premium that we previously did not have to pay into. For many teachers, they make less every year due to this legislation. The evaluation system, which previously had been designed at the local level, was now a standards-based one approved by the state. It includes a documentation log, which takes hours to put together. I was never sure how it was evaluated and resented doing it. Our collegial staff turned competitive as people's performances were reduced to a number. The stress and pressure are real.

I retired two years earlier than I had planned. All of those things were factors, but the main ones for me were lack of personal time, an administrator I had no relationship with whom I felt played favorites and contributed to the stress with all the demands and email communications to the staff, and paying for benefits. I was fortunate enough to be grandfathered in for free benefits on retirement, the same ones I was paying for. it was a practical decision as well as an emotional one.
NJ Teacher is offline   Reply With Quote
Gigi814's Avatar
Gigi814 Gigi814 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Posts: 573
Senior Member

Gigi814
 
Gigi814's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Posts: 573
Senior Member

Old 01-15-2019, 10:14 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

The Catholic diocese I just left was absolutely horrible. Principals did nothing in terms of behavior. They just blamed the teachers for everything and let the insane parents run the school. I had a first grader who threatened to bring guns to school and shoot everyone. I immediately called the principal who just laughed and told me the student was kidding. (Side note: I knew for a fact this child had access to guns in his home.) All of the schools had low enrollment because parents of well behaved students removed their child. Teacher turnover was high because nobody wanted to stay in that environment. The superintendent is very ditzy and doesn't understand why the diocese has such problems.
I am now looking for teaching positions in other areas and hoping things will be better. I have no idea what else I could possibly do with elementary teaching experience on my resume.
Gigi814 is offline   Reply With Quote
chipmunky chipmunky is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,971
Senior Member

chipmunky
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,971
Senior Member
To reply to..
Old 01-15-2019, 11:09 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I have no idea what else I could possibly do with elementary teaching experience on my resume.

A lot. Companies are looking for people who have people skills, have a college education, can work well in teams, can write and speak with clarity and BONUS expect to work hard and do things beyond what is written in their job description. Many companies are looking for these skills and are happy to then train the person to do the specific job they are hired for.

I know a few friends who gave up on looking for a better elementary teaching job and took a job with a corporation. Both made employee of the month after starting work!
chipmunky is offline   Reply With Quote
Cinderella00's Avatar
Cinderella00 Cinderella00 is offline
 
Joined: May 2011
Posts: 1,979
Senior Member

Cinderella00
 
Cinderella00's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2011
Posts: 1,979
Senior Member
Teacher shortage
Old 01-15-2019, 03:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

My small district is now having a real problem getting teachers. Several teachers have left this year, some with almost no notice. We had an opening in my tiny building since October that just got filled this week. Another elementary school in the district is filling a class with two subs trading off days. I'd be ticked if my child was in that class.


Cinderella00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Hotbox88's Avatar
Hotbox88 Hotbox88 is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 133
Full Member

Hotbox88
 
Hotbox88's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2016
Posts: 133
Full Member
Lots of reasons
Old 01-15-2019, 04:35 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

In my state, the teacher population is aging. And there are fewer people getting degrees in education. We used to have student teachers all of the time, but it’s been a long while since we’ve had any. That, and the surrounding states pay a lot more, so many teachers start here, then leave the state to make more money. I think the lack of people going into teaching is due to a combination of things. Teachers take the blame for everything, it seems. And parents are taking less and less responsibility for their children. Student behavior is a huge issue where I’m at. Then there’s the new evaluation system, testing, data gathering, professional development that is a waste of time, etc, etc, etc. My state also doesn’t pay very well. I’m so glad I got to teach back in the good old days, when it was fun and a lot less stressful! I can certainly understand why there seems to be a bit of a teacher shortage in places. My district is already asking for us to let them know if we won’t be returning next year. They have to try to hire early to be able to fill all of their open positions. And I know for a fact that they hire people without teaching degrees to fill the high need positions. It’s a sad state of affairs. However, this year, I am one of those who won’t be returning next year! I get to retire! Woohoo!!!! Retirement Board, here I come!

Last edited by Hotbox88; 01-15-2019 at 07:16 PM..
Hotbox88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 8,321
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 8,321
Senior Member

Old 01-15-2019, 04:52 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Yes, I am seeing this in my area. We actually had two teachers quit mid-year this year. At my school, it is a combination of student behavior, insane expectations, and money.

My current admin is actually more supportive with behavior than any admin I've had before. Even so, it's still out of control. We get more violent and out of control kids every year.

I am in a low SES school that is actually doing quite well. Our data is downright amazing, and we've won several awards. That comes with a lot of sacrifices though. Our entire day, other than a 20 minute recess, is rigorous academics, even in K. Any "fun" has been removed. We get constant walkthroughs encouraging quick pacing, repetitions, etc. Everything is direct instruction.

The expectations surrounding planning are ridiculous. Templates are now required that resemble what I had to do in college as a student teacher- multiple pages for one lesson. Most planning periods are taken up with "coaching" or PLC. We're constantly looking and talking about data. Students are no longer allowed to be anything but their data. Nothing else matters but the almighty data and there are NO excuses. Everything is the teacher's fault. They are constantly piling on more and more things for us to do and keep track of.

On top of all of this, the salary doesn't match the COL at all. I said in a previous thread that a new teacher would take home about $2,000 per month. My basic bills (rent, utilities, car insurance, phone, internet- no cable) are around $1800 per month, and I pay significantly less in rent than most. I also have no car payment or student loans. I frankly don't understand how new teachers are doing it.

A housing boom happened here within the past 5-10 years. The schools are going to have a BIG problem when older teachers who already had houses before all of this retire. There is no way to be a homeowner as a teacher unless you have family money or a wealthy spouse.

Local colleges are also reporting that their percentage of students majoring in education has dropped significantly- in some programs, as much as 75%. Honestly, if I had grown up in this state and realized what I was getting into, I probably wouldn't have gone into teaching. Teachers in my home state make plenty to live a solidly middle class lifestyle in accordance with the COL. Why would anyone get a college degree and enter into a professional field to live in poverty? Why would anyone want to become a teacher when they hear constant bashing and blaming on the news?
Haley23 is offline   Reply With Quote
bison06 bison06 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,682
Senior Member

bison06
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,682
Senior Member

Old 01-15-2019, 06:53 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

I resigned November 1st. I was in a new district and the admin was ineffective at handling discipline. Plus no curriculum meant I was working 12 hour days + weekends. I started Prozac and Adderall to try to compensate for my mental health struggles, but it wasnít enough.

Another teacher quit the 1st or 2nd week of school. It was her first year at the school too. Not sure why she quit but I think it was behavior related.

My best friend from my old school quit too. She had an anxiety attack at school (AP saw her going in/coming out of bathroom) and went on fmla then found another job (not teaching).
bison06 is offline   Reply With Quote
Ima Teacher's Avatar
Ima Teacher Ima Teacher is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 29,531
Senior Member

Ima Teacher
 
Ima Teacher's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 29,531
Senior Member

Old 01-15-2019, 07:09 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

We had a few leave. One left to be a SAHM and two changed careers. All were under 10 years in teaching. They were all good at what they did, but were fed up with some of the issues in education in general.
Ima Teacher is offline   Reply With Quote
Kathcha's Avatar
Kathcha Kathcha is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,609
Senior Member

Kathcha
 
Kathcha's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,609
Senior Member
I hear you
Old 01-15-2019, 10:23 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

on all that was written. As I said, I worked in an inner city middle and high school where of course there was so much poverty, so much truancy, gangs, kids that weren't eating or wouldn't come to school because they didn't have simple things like clean clothes, drugs, teachers getting assaulted, no parents at parent night, kids working to help support themselves or getting involved in the wrong stuff, parents who were gang members, pregnancies, a lot of violence, I could go on and on but basically as a guidance counselor, I had police and child protective services in my office every day. And still.....the teachers and staff got blamed constantly in the news for low test scores and everything else. I never worried about being the target of gunfire but about drive by shootings just trying to get to my car, which by the way, was many times in the dark because I worked so many hours, left home in the dark and returned in the dark. Our administrators were not in a union as we were so we got the dregs of the earth, who would work there? My principal would walk in to staff meetings telling us she had wine in her coffee cup to cope and that was just one administrator who was nuts. Another one had me taking stress FMLA because he was so abusive to women and trying to make me do his job. And last but not least, with all the stress involved, I loved working with the kids but like many jobs, I couldn't do the job I wanted to do. I so wanted to help those kids even though I'd have caseloads of 350 kids and every single day, new students from all over the world! There was no common sense that all we were told to do was test, test, test when kids were not getting their basic needs met. I felt like I had my finger in the dike. And all I was told by administration was that this was a school, not a mental hospital. The stress was unbearable, I never slept worrying about kids and finally for my own mental and physical health, had to retire and it was a good decision even though I wished I could have helped kids more but it was an impossible job that couldn't be done and I finally had to come to terms with that.


Kathcha is offline   Reply With Quote
afsdfdaggggf
 
 
Guest

afsdfdaggggf
 
 
Guest

Old 01-16-2019, 05:02 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

Is that what they tell others when a teacher quits! She quit because of discipline problems. +rolling eyes+

I quit twice at different schools, the first time I quit was because

1. I was expected to manipulate the attendance. The student attendance was to be change to be present no matter how late if he/she had a note. Think about that for a minute. I had students stay in the bathroom for 40 min. I had to change it to present because I got a note from the P 2 mins before the bell. They would not write the policy for anyone, they would only verbalize it at meetings!
2. Reduce the amount of referral to the office-don't give teachers real carbon copies of referrals to use. They have to write it on a copy of the copy. No paper trail. Also make a copy of the copy of the copy.
3. EIP insane expectations; the classroom was not equipped to handle her situation either. Student was placed in my largest class. She had about 15 different classroom accommodation not counting the learning modifications. I also had other EIPs in the same large classroom. If something happened to this student, I would have been hold accountable for it. At the end, I realized it was just a ploy from mom to get things from administration. Administration didn't have the backbone to say the obvious:she needed to be in a home school environment. She was a liability to the school and teachers and they did nothing.
4. Grade inflation: I mean really really grade inflation. Otherwise, you have to explain why someone is failing a class. How do you that when they are marked present in your class? You can't.

The second time I quit; not long ago: I was hired under false pretenses and was not given the specific support that was promised to do my job.

In school number one which I love and always will, I was bullied relentlessly because I refused to do some of the things mentioned above. I cry when I think about it but, I will not return to teaching. For one, I don't feel that I can keep my integrity and still be a teacher.
  Reply With Quote
Zia's Avatar
Zia Zia is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2015
Posts: 17,007
Senior Member

Zia
 
Zia's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2015
Posts: 17,007
Senior Member

Old 01-16-2019, 06:16 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

This article is appropriate to this thread:
LINK
Zia is offline   Reply With Quote
dutchgirl's Avatar
dutchgirl dutchgirl is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,601
Senior Member

dutchgirl
 
dutchgirl's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,601
Senior Member

Old 01-16-2019, 09:12 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

Zia, thanks for the link! Sad, but true.
dutchgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
otterblue otterblue is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 6
New Member

otterblue
 
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 6
New Member
We had a teacher just quit today...
Old 01-16-2019, 09:59 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

I teach in an elementary school and our music teacher just quit today. District's going to try and get a long term sub for the rest of the year.

I don't think he gave much advance notice, maybe none.
otterblue is offline   Reply With Quote
dutchgirl's Avatar
dutchgirl dutchgirl is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,601
Senior Member

dutchgirl
 
dutchgirl's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 4,601
Senior Member

Old 01-16-2019, 10:07 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

We have two teachers quitting now. Last year we had two quit without finishing the year. Until the last few years, I didnít know anyone doing that!
dutchgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
basketball777 basketball777 is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,846
Senior Member

basketball777
 
Joined: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,846
Senior Member

Old 01-16-2019, 10:08 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

Yes I’m an example of it.

I was overworked at a very overly time consuming school w high expectations and experienced workplace bullying. The district was known for nonrenewing countless teachers and that happened to me(I resigned) when downsizing my school. Then I took a job in the only district that hired me....it was so rough & horrible (really time consuming too) that I quit within 12 days! The shortage in my area seems to be for substitutes! I do sub and districts will hire most anyone who meets the minimum requirement and are often begging people to take jobs. Also science math special ed. However it’s real competitive for elementary...they interview 10-20 people per job so u only have a one tenth chance of being picked it seems. I went to 18 interviews (mostly in one year)and never selected. I’m at a crossroads in my career....in some ways I’ve experienced too many negative experiences in my last few yrs of teaching & other ways I’d be happy at a decent school that’s not extremely time consuming. Other times I’d like to possibly switch careers. It’s partially because I’m a single momtho.
basketball777 is offline   Reply With Quote
ellenroo's Avatar
ellenroo ellenroo is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2018
Posts: 145
Full Member

ellenroo
 
ellenroo's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2018
Posts: 145
Full Member

Old 01-16-2019, 10:52 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

We had 4 leave the first 2 weeks of the fall semester and it was the administration's fault. I'm thinking about quitting because we don't teach anymore. We teach to the test. As an art teacher, I don't have a test to teach to. Or so I thought. They want me to teach them to write papers and relate it to math and science. I can't teach them art techniques without taking it back to a tested subject. And I don't have a curriculum for that. Put that on top of a 40 minute commute and I'm spending more time creating lessons and grading and school in general than I'm ever home or with my family. I've developed anxiety attacks as students are unruly and administration does nothing to rein them in. Students favorite thing to tell me is that they can get me fired in an instant. And they can. they can do whatever they want here with no repercussions. It's sad but I've about reached my limit with the education system in general.
ellenroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Mshope's Avatar
Mshope Mshope is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,092
Senior Member

Mshope
 
Mshope's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,092
Senior Member
None
Old 01-16-2019, 04:28 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

In my district and area, jobs are very hard to get. I don't see too many people quitting unless they are going to a higher paying district. It is discouraging to read about all the things going on.

I have to admit at my school, we have issues but overall, things are decent. I feel like we have had a decent group of kids for the last several years. Now we aren't making tons of money in comparison to some districts in wealthier areas, but we are making more than teachers at local private schools.

I think if someone wants to teach, he or she should go for it. I've never regretted following my dream. It is not easy but I worked other jobs and I didn't care for them. However, I wouldn't go into teaching for summer's off. I'm usually taking classes or teaching some summer program anyway.
Mshope is offline   Reply With Quote
Guest2019 Guest2019 is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 28
New Member

Guest2019
 
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 28
New Member
It is a big problem within our state.
Old 01-17-2019, 04:14 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

It is not a big problem in my area of the state, but overall the state has major issues.

There are many reasons given. Money is seldom the issue. There are a bunch of areas where teachers just do not return after Christmas Break.
Sometimes they don't make it through the 1st month even. A few make it for 1-3 yrs in an area.
There are always the exceptions. In some of these areas, there will be someone who has found a way to thrive. They might marry into a family or just somehow like it.

There are many areas that that go years without qualified teachers.
When I first looked for a job in this state, I was certified Pre-K- 8th grade. A HS principal asked me if I'd be able to teach HS chemistry. Uh, not a chance! After I told him no, he called me back within an hour and asked if I would be able to just read and follow along with the book.
I am so glad I said no even though I needed a job. Here are the reasons I have heard from people who left:
1. Total disrespect and hatefulness from parents, other teachers, and administration
2. Whatever goes wrong, it is always the teacher's fault and he or she is expected to fix the problem with no support.
3. Living conditions - Violence, drugs, and alcoholism abound
4. The inability to have a work/life balance in these areas.
5. The schools are a "Free for All." The kids and parents run the show. One told me that in the gym the parents and kids spit tobacco out on the gym floors regularly. The sad part is young kids chewed tobacco.

6. The teachers fear for their safety.
7. Child abuse and child sexual abuse is often prevalent in these high turn over places. When the teacher reports it, they are a target to part of the community. Safety becomes a huge concern for them. I have known 4 teachers who took kids to get them to a better place with parent permission or state permission- long term foster care.

8. Suicide/depression- I met a couple who were the exception to the rule about 7 years ago. They were talking about wide spread suicides ( close to 20 in 1 yr) where they taught. I had never even heard of 1 suicide. From what they said, it is not publicized because reports say that the more publicity they get, the more people kill themselves.
I have a feeling if I'd have gone to one of those places, I might have lasted a year and I am fairly stable and experienced. Sometimes they hire young new teachers and dump them out in these areas.
Guest2019 is offline   Reply With Quote
Xombee Xombee is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 12
New Member

Xombee
 
Joined: Jan 2019
Posts: 12
New Member
My thoughts
Old 01-17-2019, 06:38 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

I'm planning on quitting within the next year. I'm attending night classes to learn welding. Money isn't the issue for me.

I'm quitting because the sense of entitlement of students and parents is getting more horrible every year. Parents have set a threshold of what they think their child should have for grades, and if they don't get those grades, they attack the teacher. I'm talking about a kid getting a B, and the parent can't accept that.

Another reason is the waning respect that students have for authority. They are precious little lambs in their parents eyes, despite their flaws with basic discipline, so any corrective action is viewed as excessive.

Finally, I'm quitting because of the encroachment of expecting constant upgrades to your education without a reasonable compensation. Each year the pay increases a little. But we have to take on constant training and accept new initiatives or we lose our certification to teach. Most of the new initiatives are short lived and are found to be ineffective.

The constant stress and an inability for most teaching professionals to leave work at work is shortening lives. My blood pressure is at dangerous levels and I find it difficult to get a decent night's sleep.

That's why I'm out.
Xombee is offline   Reply With Quote
jhock216 jhock216 is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 2
New Member

jhock216
 
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 2
New Member

Old 01-22-2019, 09:51 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

Did you have other jobs lined up after those first two?

I am in a similar position right now -- my first job is like your 1. and my current job is like a combination of the two. I have been here since October and have been constantly job hunting since my first week - when I got an impression of what the building and job were actually like versus what was promised in my interview.
jhock216 is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
The VENT
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:46 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net