Dog help - ProTeacher Community




      
Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Teachers' Lounge


Dog help

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Claire's Avatar
Claire Claire is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 9,471
Senior Member

Claire
 
Claire's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 9,471
Senior Member
Dog help
Old 01-28-2020, 04:36 PM
  #1

So I have a chi mix that we got from the shelter. We've had him 3 ish years. He's super sweet and affectionate with ALL people. Loves all my kids friends, family...everyone.

Problem is he's super territorial with the other dog. My old man lab. Outside they're fine. Inside after a while it's fine-ish. He still gets riled up when the other dog gets near us.

When I first let them in from being outside, chi mix goes insane. He barks, chases old man lab, jumps at him....everything you can think of. This goes on until I physically pick him up or grab his collar and stop him. Old lab won't put him in his place. He just runs. He's so sweet. After I settle him down from his initial frenzy he's okay. Sometime he even goes and lays down by him.

Help with getting rid of this behavior??? This is probably why I was his 3rd parent from the pound ......



Last edited by Claire; 01-28-2020 at 05:32 PM..
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote

twin2 twin2 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 16,015
Senior Member

twin2
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 16,015
Senior Member

Old 01-28-2020, 05:03 PM
  #2

I had a little old man dog that got picked on my our larger dog. We were unable to train the aggression out of her, though my daughter trained her in other areas and she responded well. We were afraid if we gave her up, she either would not get adopted or she would get aggressive then put down. Maybe our thinking was foolish, but that's where we were. We ended up separating the dogs with a baby gate and alternated our time with us. The larger dog went into her crate when the smaller dog had free run of the house.it wasn't the best solution, but it kept both dogs safe.

Personally I wish we could have worked with a dog behavior specialist to see if we could change the behavior but we could not afford that luxury. I recommend you work with one if you are able so that your dogs can have the best chance for a normal life.
twin2 is offline   Reply With Quote
seenthelight seenthelight is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,110
Senior Member

seenthelight
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,110
Senior Member

Old 01-28-2020, 06:26 PM
  #3

Thatís typical chihuahua behavior. Theyíre very possessive of their people. Iím surprised he hasnít chosen A person. Only thing you can do is try to train a different behavior. Old man is let out first, let in first, fed first. Everything good happens to old man first. Since he wonít put him in his way place, itís up to you to establish pack order.

Next up, get a crate. Picking him up and holding him until he calms down is reinforcing the behavior. By attacking old man, heís getting to be close to you. He only gets picked up long enough to deposit him in his crate. If youíre worried itíll cause a negative association with the crate, a bedroom or bathroom will work as well. This is only for a couple of minutes, but if he comes out and goes for old man, then he goes right back to time out.

Last, find his holy grail. The treat or toy that he values above all others. He comes in calmly? He leaves old man alone? BINGO! Extra special, extra yummy treat that he only gets for showing calm behavior around old man. Chiís are stubborn, but theyíre smart. It wonít take him too long to deduce that treats are waaay better than time out.
seenthelight is offline   Reply With Quote
Claire's Avatar
Claire Claire is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 9,471
Senior Member

Claire
 
Claire's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 9,471
Senior Member
Thank you!
Old 01-28-2020, 06:33 PM
  #4

We have crates for them so I will try putting him in time out and treats. I had a chi mix rescue before him for 18 years and she was never like this. It's so frustrating. You're right that picking him up is giving him what he wants.

He is possessive of all of us. Anyone he is sleeping with is who he wants to defend. Doesnt matter if it's me, my husband, my dd 14....But he loves everyone that comes in the house! So weird.
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
knitting987! knitting987! is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,725
Senior Member

knitting987!
 
Joined: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,725
Senior Member

Old 01-28-2020, 09:52 PM
  #5

See a behaviorist. They can help.


knitting987! is offline   Reply With Quote
TeacherPK6's Avatar
TeacherPK6 TeacherPK6 is online now
 
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,042
Senior Member

TeacherPK6
 
TeacherPK6's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 4,042
Senior Member

Old 01-29-2020, 03:38 AM
  #6

I've heard you shouldn't try to establish who you think should be dominant, but go with what the dogs have established (so the chi gets fed first, etc). However, this, of course, does not mean you tolerate aggressive behavior.


Maybe try lots and lots of positive reinforcement? Have them separated when you can't monitor, but then maybe (if you can) have two people involved. One for the large dog (treating him too) and one with the little guy. You could use a clicker, and click and treat for moments when he's calm around the large dog. No treats when aggressive nor when the older guy isn't around. He'll learn that the older guy means good things happen, and that they only happen when he displays appropriate behavior.



I'm no expert, I just binge watch animal shows. Take my advice with a grain of salt.
TeacherPK6 is online now   Reply With Quote
seenthelight seenthelight is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,110
Senior Member

seenthelight
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,110
Senior Member

Old 01-29-2020, 06:42 AM
  #7

Dominance theory would advise tolling the dog which is terrible advice. I abhor dominance theory. Dominance theory completely misinterprets how a pack functions. A pack is generally a bonded pair and their offspring. The ďalphasĒ are actually mom and dad. They protect the pack and are the providers of food. Dominance has them not only as disciplinarians, but as harsh ones.

What I am talking about is reinforcing the natural order. You are in control. There is no need to figure it. You are the provider of food and all good things, and you provide them consistently. Mr. Chi doesnít need to fight for momís attention. He neednít worry. Mom is going to love on him. He doesnít need to defend his food. Mom will provide it every day. There are simply rules and expectations. Allowing the dogs to figure it out on their own can get a dog killed. Imagine for a moment old man was the one vying to be dominant. As a lab, the chihuahua would stand no chance if he got riled up enough. The size difference is too large.

When you reinforce naturally, you eliminate dog fights as there is no need for them to challenge each other as they would in the wild. In 25+ years of having a multi-dog home, Iíve had one fight. A young pup that Iíd rescued off the streets tried to establish dominance and a fight broke out. I quickly intervened, and there were no serious injuries. I spent the next few weeks reestablishing pack order, and no more issues.

If you YouTube Victoria Stillwell (definitely anti-dominance), youíll see she recommends most of the same things Iím saying.

Here is a good example:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=i-0W5d...E&index=2&t=0s

Thereís another video that I canít find right now in which she actually has the owner pretend to eat first because the human is the head of the pack. Notice there is no shouting, rolling, posturing over the dog or other such behaviors that those that subscribe to ďdominanceĒ theory promote.
seenthelight is offline   Reply With Quote
seenthelight seenthelight is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,110
Senior Member

seenthelight
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,110
Senior Member

Old 01-29-2020, 07:08 AM
  #8

This is another good one that shows crating and treating.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pfkNMeQLLtg
seenthelight is offline   Reply With Quote
Firefly_7777's Avatar
Firefly_7777 Firefly_7777 is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,156
Senior Member

Firefly_7777
 
Firefly_7777's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,156
Senior Member
Dogs
Old 01-29-2020, 08:42 AM
  #9

I have a somewhat similar problem when my dd brings her chiweenie over. She keeps getting in my rat terrierís face even tho she growls and growls. My dog wonít be tough enough. So... we got out a spray bottle of water. It has helped so much. All the chiweenie needs to do is SEE the bottle and she backs off. They can even both sit in my lap now thanks to the water bottle. I feel sorry for your older dog! Good luck!
Firefly_7777 is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Teachers' Lounge
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:36 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net
8