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rubyanne rubyanne is offline
 
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questions, questions, too many questions!
Old 08-22-2018, 04:47 PM
 
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I teach first grade. This year I have pretty good class but they are starting to interrupt way too much. They ask me questions all the time or raise their hand while I am still talking. Any moment I take to breath or grab something like a pen they will ask me questions. "Can you read such and such book", "what are we doing next", "when is lunch", "can I use markers", "can I take this home" etc. I have a few students that just keep their hands raised when I am talking!

I keep going over procedures and rules. I tell them the schedule and show them where things are. I write on the board and verbally tell them what to do when they finish. We practice transitions and make anchor charts. It's frustrating because I go into the other classrooms and their students are all writing or reading quietly. One teacher said she has no problem with kids blurting out and she has "excellent classroom management".

What makes this so exhausting for me is that my own 7 year-old will not stop asking me questions all the way to work and back. I have no quiet time!

Ideas to squelch this behavior? I have a time out chair and also have positive behavior motivations. At least I seem to have curbed the poking each other thing they were doing!


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Old 08-22-2018, 06:43 PM
 
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Prolonged withering stare to the point of discomfort. Then move on with your lessson with zero verbal acknowledgment of the blurted out question.
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Old 08-22-2018, 06:56 PM
 
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Oooh! Good idea!
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Old 08-22-2018, 07:14 PM
 
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Love that Idea!

Quote:
Prolonged withering stare to the point of discomfort. Then move on with your lessson with zero verbal acknowledgment of the blurted out question.
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Old 08-22-2018, 07:18 PM
 
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Read aloud: My Mouth is a Volcano by Julia Cook. It's a story about interrupting.


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Old 08-22-2018, 07:20 PM
 
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I have that one. I was planning on it tomorrow. Thanks.
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if you find out the answer...
Old 08-22-2018, 08:24 PM
 
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The nightmares return....geez, this was like 5th grade class last year. 80 Gazillion questions...on topic, off topic, with hands raised, without hands raised, hands raised while I was talking, blurters, stupid questions, questions that didn't need to be answered....constant. I feel like I tried everything, but nothing squelched it 100%. Ignoring it/not feeding in to it worked the best, but it took them forever to get the fact that I wasn't going to answer/acknowledge.

I've seen where a teacher would give a kid say 3-5 popsicle sticks, counters, etc. Each question costs one of those items. When the item is gone, no more questions. Unfortunately, this wouldn't work with my 5th graders last year because they'd just blurt anyway. It should got really annoying. Who knew introducing a game of Math Connect 4 would yield 20 minutes of questions before playing?!?!? Dude, you guys, you just waited 20 minutes of game time!
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Old 08-22-2018, 09:13 PM
 
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Rubyanne, what is the consequence the students receive for their interrupting?
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questions
Old 08-23-2018, 04:00 AM
 
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When is snack, lunch, recess, going home? I didn't answer but made 9x12 poster of each event, with a picture labeled an analog clock with the hands drawn to correct time and the time written digitally. Posted them on either of classroom clock. Went over it once...explained don't ask again about time...They figured out or quit asking.

Today's children seem to be quite anxious and need so much reassurance. I did find writing the days agenda on the side of the board helped. Some seem to like that midday we'd erase what we had already accomplished. quickly review what was to come.
My 1st principal a wise woman with years of teaching 1st grade behind her told me it takes 4 weeks to get 1st grade settled in 6 weeks if its is a tough group. Take heart...
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Old 08-23-2018, 04:29 AM
 
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Thank you. Iím wondering if I need to pull out the old clip chart so they can physically move a clip for interrupting/off topic behavior. Right now I have the warning, take a break method but my kiddos seem to like a time out! They want to stay there!

I agree they are an anxious bunch. They want to please me and are unsure of things. I will keep going over the schedule throughout the day. That is a great idea.

Itís frustrating because my own daughter wants to talk with me and ask me questions and I have no energy for it. She is a very smart and inquisitive child and all I want her to do is stay quiet after school. Poor kid.


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Old 08-23-2018, 04:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Itís frustrating because my own daughter wants to talk with me and ask me questions and I have no energy for it. She is a very smart and inquisitive child and all I want her to do is stay quiet after school. Poor kid.

It's hard when your bio kids are close to your student kids' age. I remember those days! There was no escaping 5 year olds! But it passed more quickly than I realized it would.
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Old 08-23-2018, 07:06 AM
 
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Hi Ruby, it sounds like you are trying your best. Here are some things to think about: your warnings do not work with this group, and the consequence is perceived as a "reward" of some sort. From that alone, can you see why your current methods aren't working? Some good advice I have gotten is find out what they care about and use it against them. Something that has been effective for me is using a daily chart that goes home for parents to sign daily. I pass out popsicle sticks and the amount of sticks equals lost choice time and also designates the symbol they will get on their chart. I also use non verbal signals for warnings. It keeps me from needing to stop and give a reminder mid lesson, if the behavior continues I will give a stick. Most of the time I do not say anything. This requires some front loading so that students know the signals, how to receive a stick and what to do with it, etc. You could also teach them a non verbal response signal in lieu of hand raising that they hold in front of their chest. This can be less disrupting to other kids. I also have a non verbal signal for "hands down, please". Part of what you are experiencing is the age, now its up.to you to mold those tendencies. You can do it and will be great!!
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Old 08-23-2018, 08:28 AM
 
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Quote:
It's hard when your bio kids are close to your student kids' age. I remember those days! There was no escaping 5 year olds! But it passed more quickly than I realized it would.
So true!! When there were several options, I tended to choose sub jobs away from my own son's grade for the same reason.


The question thing is a tough one because you want to discourage disruptions without discouraging curiosity. It's about knowing when questions are appropriate, so I suggest question buckets:

Bucket 1 - "Right-Now" Questions
Bucket 2 - "Save for Later" Questions
Bucket 3 - "I Can Find Out" Questions

It will take some set-up time at first, but should start paying off fairly quickly. You start with sort of a chatter session where the kids make up questions and you sort them into categories (writing them on the board or chart paper is good for this part). For instance:

#1 - (actual question about the lesson) or May I go to the bathroom?
#2 - Why is the sky blue? or Do you have dog?
#3 - When is lunch? or Where do I turn in this paper?

Talk about #3 especially - that they can look on the schedule to see what time lunch is, or ask a neighbor which bin to put their paper in.

After they get the idea, you can use paper buckets taped to the board, or even real ones, as long as you can point to them when you're teaching. Then when they blurt, you can point to the right bucket instead of engaging them in conversation. (You will also need to set-aside a time for the curiosity questions in bucket 2.)

Later in the year, you can even use this to practice writing, by having them write down their own "Save for Later" questions!
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Old 08-23-2018, 02:25 PM
 
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Today went much better. I think they are starting to understand Ms. Rubyanne will not do everything for them. I also went over the schedule and wrote out when we have restroom/water breaks.

It is going to take some time with this class. I found out one of my big offenders has some sensory and other issues I didn't know about. Addressing that might help.

I found I had a little more energy today to listen to my own 7 year-old.
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Old 08-23-2018, 04:12 PM
 
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It's a loooooong road. Are you a talker? I am! One thing that I've had to learn is not to engage. After I've gone over the expectations, if a kid blurts, I completely ignore. When they raise their hand, I'm all ready to hear them. Does it always work? Noooo . . . because I'm still talking.

I love the idea of question buckets. I might steal that for some behaviors I've heard are upcoming this year . . .
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Old 08-23-2018, 05:21 PM
 
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I read recently that when their hands go up, their brains turn off, so whatever you're teaching isn't even heard. I think it's true! I tell my students that if I'm teaching, I won't be able to call on them, and then I stick to it, but I'm sure if I wasn't consistent with this, they would continue the undesirable behavior. I also silently signal them to put their hands down while I'm teaching, otherwise they keep their hands raised and focus on their question instead of focusing on the lesson. Sometimes their questions are answered as I'm teaching, and if not, they can ask me when I'm finished teaching. They can remember that long if their question is really important.
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Old 08-23-2018, 06:38 PM
 
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I taught pre-k for 6 years and the amount of questions would drive the best, most patient teacher in the world insane! I donít mind questions that actually need an answer but if you ask me in MAY- What time is recess/lunch/specials?!??! I just cannot deal with it. I like the idea of giving kids popsicle sticks and letting them ask that many questions. I hate discouraging questions but a person can only tolerate so much .
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A good book
Old 08-24-2018, 01:43 PM
 
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That my students like was interrupting chicken. I have a behavior sort that we do after to discuss interrupting chicken behaviors and good student behaviors.
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