What are you best place value lessons? - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      BusyBoard

What are you best place value lessons?

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 1,087
Senior Member

MissAgnes
 
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 1,087
Senior Member
What are you best place value lessons?
Old 05-02-2019, 11:53 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I'm trying to get ahead on lesson planning and organization for next year (yes, already).
One of the first math lessons I teach is on place value. You would be surprised (or maybe not) how many kids coming into 4th grade don't know basic place value: 1s, 10s, 100s, 1000s.
I find this is a crucial concept for the rest of 4th grade math (and beyond). However, I have yet to find lessons/materials that are truly effective.
What are some great resources/materials/ideas you have found for place value?


MissAgnes is offline   Reply With Quote

Keltikmom's Avatar
Keltikmom Keltikmom is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 7,661
Senior Member

Keltikmom
 
Keltikmom's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 7,661
Senior Member
Place value lessons
Old 05-02-2019, 12:22 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

Using a T chart for ones and tens, then making three columns for hundreds, four columns for thousands. Write the numbers in appropriate columns.

I also found using manipulatives was imperative. I used the yellow cubes and sticks and blocks. I think cuisinaire rods are similar?? Especially when it comes to regrouping.

If you use Donors Choose or can get a grant, get a full class set.
Keltikmom is offline   Reply With Quote
Lakeside's Avatar
Lakeside Lakeside is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,942
Senior Member

Lakeside
 
Lakeside's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,942
Senior Member

Old 05-02-2019, 12:25 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

For a fun review lesson - tape off squares on your floor, give each kid a digit on a large piece of paper, and call them up to make various numbers by standing in the right place value box.

For materials - I like the flip charts that actually have all the zeros underneath (so if you lift up, say, the tens, there is a "100" underneath, even though the tens were covering all but the "1" digit.)
Lakeside is offline   Reply With Quote
MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 1,087
Senior Member

MissAgnes
 
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 1,087
Senior Member
I have some manipulatives.
Old 05-02-2019, 01:27 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I have a class set of base ten blocks that I use.
I always teach math concepts in the same way: first with manipulatives, then with visuals (pictures), and finally with numbers.
But I'm always up for different manipulatives and lessons to reinforce concepts.
MissAgnes is offline   Reply With Quote
ConnieWI ConnieWI is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,684
Senior Member

ConnieWI
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,684
Senior Member
Saying the Numbers
Old 05-03-2019, 10:58 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

Love all the ideas so far and would definitely use the base ten blocks, drawing pictures of numbers (using small squares or Xs for ones, tall rectangles for tens, and squares for hundreds), and dictation of numbers on T-charts.

Don't forget to give students daily lists of numbers. Begin by placing them on your overhead and saying as a whole class. Then give partners a different list of numbers to practice with their partner. Begin small...numbers in the ones and tens (one day of practice), numbers in the ones, tens, and hundreds (two days of practice), numbers in the ones, tens, hundreds, and thousands, etc. Model for students how to say these numbers without using the word "and."

125 is one hundred twenty-five, not one hundred and twenty-five.

3,467 is three thousand four hundred sixty-seven, not three thousand four hundred and sixty-seven.

Place Value Game
I give students a T-chart with two to four columns labeled ones, tens, hundreds, thousands and a deck of cards placed facedown with the jokers, kings, queens, jacks, and tens removed. The aces equal one. Shuffle the deck. Partner one chooses a single card and places it in one column on their T-chart, and partner two does the same thing. Partner one choses a second card and places it on their T-chart, and partner two does the same thing. Partners continue to take turns choosing a card depending on how many columns you are using on the T-chart. Once a card is placed in a column, it cannot be moved to a different column. Students know the rules for creating their number...one day students try to create the largest number and another day the smallest number. The person with the winning number has to say the number correctly or loses that round. After ten rounds, the person with the most wins is the champion.

Find Your Place Value

Materials: one shuffled deck of cards with the tens and face cards removed (If there are more than two players, you may want to use two decks of cards with tens and face cards removed.)

Players: 2 to 4 players

Directions:
--Shuffle the cards. One player deals the cards evenly among the players.
--Players place their cards in a stack facedown in front of them.
--Each player turns over two (or three or four) cards depending on the grade level. Each player arranges his/her cards to make the greatest possible two/three/four-digit number.
--Each player reads his/her number aloud. The player with the greatest number wins all the cards from that round and places them in a separate pile.
--Play continues until all cards have been used.
--The player with the most cards at the end of the game wins.

Variations:
--Players may use five, six, or seven cards to work with greater place values. Use two decks of cards.
--Players may also form the lowest possible number to win each round.
--Player may also form the highest possible number in the first round, the lowest possible number in the second round, etc.



Last edited by ConnieWI; 05-03-2019 at 11:15 AM..
ConnieWI is offline   Reply With Quote
jjwires jjwires is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,967
Senior Member

jjwires
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 3,967
Senior Member

Old 05-03-2019, 04:45 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Kim Sutton has some very good materials for place value. Base Ten blocks are crucial.
jjwires is offline   Reply With Quote
123rabbit's Avatar
123rabbit 123rabbit is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,446
Senior Member

123rabbit
 
123rabbit's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,446
Senior Member
Race to 100 or 1000
Old 05-03-2019, 08:04 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I start my 1st graders playing race to 100. 1 gameboard divided into 3 sections- ones with a ten frame, tens place and a hundreds place....students take turns rolling 1 dice ...add small construction paper squares to start filling the 10 frame when they get enough they trade for a ten stick construction paper. Then keep going till they finally make a 100 and trade for a bigger square construction paper

2nd semester we now race to the hundreds building numbers like 342 till we get to 1000

I keep the manipulatives simple...ideas cut foam sheets into little sqares for1s... 10s rods for tens and bigger sqares for 100s. ...construction paper can also be used...one year I used tiny pom pom balls for 1s bigger ones for 10s and bigger sparkle ones for hundreds...

This game is perfect for adding...counting numbers....making tens ...and place value....

One variation is race to a dollar by using pennies...dimes and a dollar to reinforce money...
123rabbit is offline   Reply With Quote
UVAgrl928 UVAgrl928 is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 362
Full Member

UVAgrl928
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 362
Full Member

Old 05-04-2019, 03:10 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

ConnieWI- I saw “overhead” and had to stop and giggle... I didn’t know they still existed!
UVAgrl928 is offline   Reply With Quote
Lakeside's Avatar
Lakeside Lakeside is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,942
Senior Member

Lakeside
 
Lakeside's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,942
Senior Member

Old 05-04-2019, 03:54 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

Quote:
I start my 1st graders playing race to 100. 1 gameboard divided into 3 sections- ones with a ten frame, tens place and a hundreds place....students take turns rolling 1 dice ...add small construction paper squares to start filling the 10 frame when they get enough they trade for a ten stick construction paper. Then keep going till they finally make a 100 and trade for a bigger square construction paper
I love that idea!
Lakeside is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
BusyBoard
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:21 PM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net