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Taking a child out of a class
Old 05-08-2019, 05:50 PM
 
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I recently went to a workshop about challenging students. A case was discussed where a teacher asked a child to be removed from their class. It opened some discussion. I'm going to hold my opinion for a bit. What do think? Should a child be removed from a class due to behavior? I'm not taking about parents wanting a different class.


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Old 05-08-2019, 08:42 PM
 
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It's a legit request should a teacher feel
that she or her students are endangered or threatened in any way. Districts very often won't do anything to help the student so the teacher has no other recourse.
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Old 05-08-2019, 08:53 PM
 
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Previous admin did this all of the time. They moved challenging students into rooms of teachers who had better management. As the sped teacher, I continually advocated for admin NOT to do this- they were clearly burning these people out. To me, it seemed like an easy out for admin, when they should have been working with teachers who had weaker management so more issues could be spread out between classes.

One of my good friends, who taught K at our school, got so many mid-year transfers that people started jokingly referring to her class as Ms. _____'s boot camp. After one particularly rough year, she'd had enough and left our school to go to a much easier school/district. Is that what's best for our kids?

As for a teacher requesting a child be moved, I think there are too many factors to just make a hypothetical opinion. For example, if there are two students who really set each other off and are horrible together but manageable separately, then it makes sense for a teacher to ask that one student be moved. I'd have less sympathy for someone who just doesn't want to deal with the child- so you want to put that on your teammate instead? How is that fair?
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Old 05-08-2019, 09:02 PM
 
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Admin typically find services and give assistance when teachers prove the student is dangerous . When enough teachers have the guts to refuse a student entry into class,the student is finally given the services he/ she has been denied for many years.
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Sometimes
Old 05-09-2019, 01:47 AM
 
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Situation 1 - Child is putting other people in danger:
absolutely OK to request child be moved (to a completely different setting, not just pawned off on another same-level teacher).

Situation 2 - two students that are fine separately, but impossible together:
OK to request a move with the other teacher involved, and not dumping on someone else who is already swamped. (And use this solution carefully - or you'll end up with a ton of separation requests from parents! This should be about specific behaviors that feed off of each other, not just kids who don't like each other.)

Situation 3 - typical bad behavior, wanting kid moved to "more experienced" teacher: not OK - this is how the teachers with great management get burnt out! Instead, the teacher needs support to deal with the difficult kid(s) so she can get experience.

Situation 4 - exceptions to Situation 3:
I think there are rare occasions when a behavior situation becomes so personal that it ruins all chance of a positive relationship between teacher and student (or teacher and parent) and a fresh start is in everyone's best interest. This should not be an automatic reaction, though.


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Old 05-09-2019, 06:10 AM
 
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Our contract gives teachers the right to have a student removed. It doesn't happen often, but it does happen. No teacher should be abused by a student.
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Taking child out of class
Old 05-09-2019, 06:15 AM
 
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I think there are a lot of variables.

If the child is endangering others, yes....and to a better placement, not just another teachers classroom.

But, what if it’s just that the teacher is over this child, or doesn’t have management skills? No, because child will get put into another “better” teacher’s class. This can become a sort of trickle down....word gets out Teacher A can’t handle certain behaviors so they need to go to Teacher B. Teacher A never learns better skills and Teacher B gets dumped on all.the.time.

Can you tell I have experience with this?
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Old 05-09-2019, 06:51 AM
 
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and very often,the school starts with all the tough ones located in the room where management is done well. This keeps kids out of the office. All those admin in there don't want to be bothered.
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Two minds.
Old 05-09-2019, 10:27 AM
 
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I think in some cases it's justified.
I had a student removed from my class because he physically assaulted me several times. It was near the end of the school year, this student and I had a contentious relationship despite my best efforts. P decided it would be best to put him in a different classroom to try to defuse the situation (and probably so I wouldn't go to the union). He was still a pill, but at least he wasn't assaulting me anymore.
The other scenario would be like Lakeside said: for whatever reason there is no chance of a positive relationship, but that should be a last resort solution.
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Old 05-09-2019, 04:16 PM
 
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I think you should be able to have a child removed. I think, whatever the reason, it usually sends the message of the patients aren't running the asylum so to speak. However, my district doesn't allow it and you will get pushed out/fired for it. It's sort of a scarlet letter. The on paper reason is stability and what's best for the child. The real reason is they're afraid of parents.


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Old 05-11-2019, 06:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Situation 3 - typical bad behavior, wanting kid moved to "more experienced" teacher: not OK - this is how the teachers with great management get burnt out! Instead, the teacher needs support to deal with the difficult kid(s) so she can get experience.
This! Yes! How do they think teachers get "good" at managing? Not by avoiding, that's for sure!
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Old 05-11-2019, 08:42 PM
 
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I have several social/emotional/behavioral students in my class. A new student moved into our school and I had the smallest class size to the child was placed with me. This new child is also a social/emotional/behavioral kid. I think this child should have been moved out of my room as soon as we figured this out. There are 20 other children in the room who shouldn't have to have their education disrupted on a daily basis with violent/explosive behaviors. My colleagues agree that they should've taken the new child since they didn't have behavior kids in their rooms.
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