Best interventions for ODD - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Special Education

Best interventions for ODD

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 6,431
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 6,431
Senior Member
Best interventions for ODD
Old 02-04-2018, 08:28 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

The student is in 2nd grade and also has pretty severe ADHD. Parents aren't willing to try medication and mostly blame any behavior issues on the school/other students.

We've tried:
-Giving choices
-Check in/check out
-Various point sheets, changing them up for novelty
-"Positive only" point sheets
-If/then
-Having him create the point sheet/behavior plan
-Giving special tasks or jobs during his least favorite parts of the school day
-Allowing preferred seating and/or a place to stand during instruction
-Extremely frequent heavy work and movement breaks

I'm afraid to post too many details about a specific student. Essentially, the student wants to run around and play all day and we haven't found a reward that he's more interested in than just choosing to ignore directions and running around and playing all day (have tried earned free time/play time/recess time with preferred peers, time with preferred adults, stickers, even things like small toys or candy). He's been suspended a few times for physical violence against both adults and students.

Is there something that works? I've only worked with one other kid with ODD, and it was actually as a camp counselor when I was in college . I was highly successful with that kid because I'd just make her think everything was her idea (i.e, at swim lessons: "I'd like to work on my backstroke. What kinds of drills have you done on your swim team? Can you show me?") I remember thinking that kind of stuff would never work in a school setting where you're kind of expected to follow the "group plan" for most of the day.


Haley23 is offline   Reply With Quote

SpedinTx SpedinTx is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 34
Junior Member

SpedinTx
 
Joined: Sep 2015
Posts: 34
Junior Member

Old 02-06-2018, 11:06 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

Try a first then activities

First do.... for 30 seconds then immediate reward like m&M or 3 min computer

Do this for several days then increase the time to 1 min for several days working up to 15 min work times.

15 min with a severe ADHD that is not regulated is a huge win for a second grader. You didn't mention how long the student would work before getting off task but if it is more than 15 min you are pushing the student past a barrier that is truly difficult for the child. Every 15 min or so the activity needs to be changed for the student
SpedinTx is offline   Reply With Quote
Sprite's Avatar
Sprite Sprite is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,075
Senior Member

Sprite
 
Sprite's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2017
Posts: 2,075
Senior Member

Old 02-06-2018, 05:19 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Does he derail the classroom?

Is he on an IEP? BIP?

Look into token economies. This may sound bad but I have a student who completely derails the classroom. If he is having an 'off' day I do everything I can to just let him do his thing. If he wants to be in my group all period, come on over, if he wants to read a book by himself-- go for it.

I praise the heck out of him when he does positive things and at this point we're just trying to keep him from being hospitalized again. He's been hospitalized 4-5 times for over a week at a time this year.

Haley if you PM me I wouldn't mind sharing my behavior chart with you. It isn't anything super original but I have had success with it.
Sprite is offline   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 6,431
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 6,431
Senior Member

Old 02-06-2018, 06:37 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Thank you for the thoughts. We have tried first/then but not at that small of increments. Right now we're not even talking about completing work...more just be in the right place at the right time and not derail the learning for everyone else (i.e, teacher is teaching in the front of the room, stand near your desk and don't yell.)

For almost the entire day it's just one teacher and a full class; this is a regular gen ed class. I'm mild/moderate and I do academic pull outs. I don't teach this student in my small group (no academic needs), but am expected to "problem solve" as part of the IEP team and I just wondered if there were any other ideas out there. We don't have the adult support to do something like give a reward every 30 seconds. Yes, he has an IEP and BIP; we were trying to get him into an ED placement and were told we need to try more things. That's difficult when we don't have the staff/support to try these "more things."

He does derail the whole class. At some points, the teacher has basically let him do what he wants, especially if he's not ruining the learning for everyone. The problem with that is he will often pick off the "weakest links" (kids most easily derailed) and pull them into whatever he is doing. You can't exactly discipline those kids and then let this kid continue doing whatever he wants.

Also, the team from the ED unit also saw this and blamed issues on "poor classroom management" because the teacher wasn't giving consequences right away. The student often lashes out physically when a consequence is given. Understandably, the teacher is concerned about her safety as well as the rest of the class. The teacher he's with is a newer teacher and she's getting thrown under the bus, IMO. This kid had very strong veteran teachers in previous grades and had the same issues.
Haley23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Lillybabe Lillybabe is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 522
Senior Member

Lillybabe
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 522
Senior Member

Old 02-06-2018, 07:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

This probably wouldn't work and I have kindergarten students so take it with a grain of salt. I do what is recommended at SmartClassroomManagement.com. I have a kindergarten student who had extreme behaviors last year in our full day prek program. To the point he was sent home or removed from the classroom frequently. Thus far this year he's had no extreme behaviors and has not been removed from class let alone sent home. What I do is treat him like everyone else. He's had the same expectations since day one. Now I keep independent work at everyone's level and break up quiet sit times throughout the day. I use basically a three strike system. If a student breaks three rules they do an in class timeout. It's been very effective. I don't make it a big deal or talk about what they did after, etc. They just quickly take 5 minutes to refocus, at the end of 5 minutes I ask them to let me know when they are ready, and if they are calm I welcome them back.

At the beginning of the year he tested me. Refused to go to timeout, crawled under the table to timeout, banged the walls in timeout, etc. I'd taken time before this to model timeout and talk about expectations in timeout. I reminded him the first time he didn't go appropriately that there would be additional consequences if he didn't go to timeout appropriately. I let them do anything in timeout so long as they are not disruptive and stay in the designated spot. Most sit quietly but I've allowed him to do sit ups/push ups, play quietly with a fidget, sing quietly to himself, etc. At the beginning of the year he got 2-3 timeouts pretty much everyday. He has little home support, is ADHD, struggles with fine motor, and has no expectations outside of school to behave. Now he often goes days without timeouts.

By holding him to the same high standards I have for everyone, I have encouraged him to rise to the challenge. I have had to extend his time out, take part of recess, and/or have him finish work during a preferred activity occasionally. I think by having clear consistent expectations, a management plan that makes sense, and developmentally appropriate teaching practices you cut down on a lot of behaviors. I also take time to teach everyone social skills and behavior expectations since I teach kindergarten. I imagine some 2nd graders still need these skills as well. Michael Linsin at SmartClassroomManagement says when you change the expectations for children with problem behaviors you make them feel like they don't deserve or can't handle the same level of respect and responsibility as everyone else.

https://www.smartclassroommanagement...-well-behaved/


Lillybabe is offline   Reply With Quote
Lottalove's Avatar
Lottalove Lottalove is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,794
Senior Member

Lottalove
 
Lottalove's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,794
Senior Member
Make sure too that the reward
Old 02-06-2018, 09:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

is something he actually wants. I had an ODD 2nd grader who had been on every plan and was getting worse.

When he came to me, he basically took it as a challenge of some sort. He was prepared to do battle.

The first time we sat down to do his "behavior chart," I asked him what he wanted to work for. He was shocked. It still took him some time but he tried very hard to earn his rewards. The others had offered traditional teacher items--candy, internet time, stickers, nice notes home, extra recess, lunch with a friend, etc. He was simply not interested.

For me, HE chose. He picked to have an extra PE class (a relative strength for him,) a nonworking computer keyboard (IT has tons,) things to tinker with or fix (P gave us a broken manual pencil sharpener,) for him and I to do something together 1:1, lunch with me in the classroom. He didn't have a lot of friends. He wasn't interested in the computer. He was a rough and tumble outdoors boy.

It eventually worked because he was working for things he wanted to earn. And, he felt he had a voice in the process.

It is definitely worth a try.
Lottalove is offline   Reply With Quote
KTeach0929
 
 
Guest

KTeach0929
 
 
Guest

Old 02-08-2018, 05:35 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I have a similiar student this year. I'm self contained and it's been really difficult. She disrupts any group activity we attempt to do and spends most of the day just being defiant. Sometimes i'm amazed with how she finds a way to be noncompliant even with the most simple direction.

Like the poster above said,one thing that we've seen *some* progress with is letting her choose what is on her reinforcement menu. We have to change it frequently, like every 2-3 weeks, or she gets tired of the choices. We've also done a behavior chart with a timer that goes off every 10 minutes and she gets a smaller reinforcer if she's had no behavior issues within that 10 minutes. We started the year with 1 minute, then 2, 5, etc..
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Special Education
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:23 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net