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Tounces Tounces is offline
 
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Tounces
 
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How many case managers are required to
Old 03-01-2018, 01:27 PM
 
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How many case managers are required to drop whatever they are doing and go help a child in a melt down? Iím a resource teacher and this has happened every day so far this week.
The problem Iím having is 1. I donít know who or what set him off 2. When I get there, there are already 3-5 others there talking to him 3. I was told previously not to restrain 4. I have documentation to fill out for others who do restrain but I wasnít present when it happened.
I got an email that stated: I have difficulty helping de-escalate students in crisis and that I have
difficulty or lack of confidence on how to complete a restrictive procedure form.
I donít feel that I have difficulty with these things. My problem is that others are already there by the time Iím called. I feel that there are too many people involved giving him attention too. Then others above me bribe him with or just give him rewards. This has been going on the previous year too and I wasnít at the school then. He is a 1st grader with some cognitive delays. He works fine with me in my small pull out group. I believe in prevention more than putting out fires that others triggered. Iím getting frustrated that this student is taking up so many peopleís time.
I asked if we could do a BIP. Iím surprised he doesnít already have one really. Administration told me ďno, because that would require an IEP meeting.Ē
I did fill out a restrictive hold form but needed more info from the people that did the hold since I wasnít present when it happened. I gave the form to the teacher that did the hold. I highlighted the parts that needed more description. I said I would fill them in the form but I wasnít there to know the whole story. Admin said I should interview them. She pulled them off their duties to ask them the questions as she typed in the form. This is the first time this was ever told to me and Iíve been at the school all year.
I donít think that means I have difficulty. To me itís her lack of communication-a common theme here. I donít know if I will be able to take anyone away from their duties myself.
I think a BIP should have been done so everyone is on the same page. Is saying no because it requires an IEP meeting reasonable? To me, it seems she is passing blame on to me and doesnít want to admit Iím right-another common theme here.
Thoughts? Advice?


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d0rkablex2 d0rkablex2 is offline
 
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me too!
Old 03-01-2018, 02:47 PM
 
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Omg....reading this I was thinking the whole time "wait....did someone post on here about my life to try to get advice for me!?" I also have a first grader with cognitive delays that I'm constantly dropping everything for and reporting to the scene for. I've never experienced any physical behavior issues with him when I'm working with him, but they happen constantly when he's not with me. Mine also has no FBA/BIP and it took until last week (almost MARCH! of his second year of these behaviors...) to get the team to agree to get permission to test to start the FBA process.

You can't decide not to do something a child needs because it would require an IEP meeting. HAVE AN IEP MEETING!! I have some kids on my caseload that we've already had 3-4 IEP meetings for this year because we were adding/changing/adjusting things for them. That's definitely an excuse admin is hiding behind. Ask them why you can't just....have an IEP meeting?

I don't really have any advice since I've experienced everything you've said myself over the course of the last 8 years in several schools....just wanted to let you know you're not alone and I think this is kind of common for resource teachers! The school I taught at years ago pulled me daily from my reading/math groups to assist with children in meltdown when I would arrive on the scene knowing nothing beyond "he's in crisis." I would often have to use context clues (i.e. what in the room had been destroyed, who/what the child was yelling about) to try to figure out what might have happened and then go from there.

Hang in there! It's not you!
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Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
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Old 03-01-2018, 05:20 PM
 
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Not anymore, but it has been a long road! When I first started at this school, it was expected that I drop everything any time a child was having a meltdown, even if the child was gen ed/not one of my students. Admin and the secretaries in the office would text all day long and I'd be expected to go to whatever room they were saying. I was also the only sped teacher for a K-6 caseload of almost 50 kids at the time!

I NEVER met IEP minutes because I was constantly pulled from teaching. My second year, another teacher was hired. She'd come from a co-teaching/inclusion position and honestly didn't seem to like/want to do the actual teaching portion of our job (we do resource/pull outs), so she jumped at the opportunity to help in crisis situations. That worked out great for me! I worked on establishing myself both as someone who excels at academic intervention and as someone who doesn't prefer the behavior stuff.

We've had a few rough kids over the years and I've always made a fuss about the IEP minutes being met, which always fell on deaf ears. I'm in a low SES school, parents won't complain, and basically no one cares. A couple of times I was accused of "not caring" about a high needs behavior student when I complained about how none of my other kids were getting their IEP minutes.

Last year, I finally felt like I was at the point with my admin where I was feeling more comfortable with really putting my foot down. I knew she loved my teaching, and I'd earned "non-probationary" status at that point. I stopped answering the texts. I kept my door closed and locked while teaching. If someone came in anyway, I'd say, "I'm so sorry, but as you can see, I'm in the middle of a lesson. I have students until 2:50. I'm happy to help problem solve after school if you'd like."

I also quit going to stupid meetings during the school day that had nothing to do with me, but admin wanted me at because it "looked good" (i.e., data teams). My data was fantastic last year. Admin and others (psych, counselor, other teachers) finally realized what I could do actually given the time to teach!

This year, I have new admin. At the beginning of the year, they had 1:1 meetings with all of us and asked what we thought was working, not working, strengths, needs, etc. I made sure to really highlight how the consistency of teaching all day had helped my kids improve this previous year. My current admin was shocked that it was ever an expectation that I be "on call" for behavior. I have never once been asked to do anything like that this year. My admin is very serious about the IEP minutes being met.

As for your situation, even though it's so annoying for you to have to do this (and no, I don't think you did anything wrong), I'd approach it as if you want their help to improve. "Thank you for bringing this to my attention. You're right; I do sometimes feel uncomfortable in these situations because I'm not sure what to do when I arrive and don't know the background. It also seems like there are already a lot of adults in the room. What specifically are you looking for from me in that situation? What does the ideal support look like? I need specific suggestions so I can improve in this area."

As for the BIP, I think you can still do a generic "behavior plan" (not a formal IEP "BIP" obviously) without an IEP meeting. At my school, tons of gen ed kids are on behavior plans. Can you suggest you start a plan as an "intervention to try?" If it works, you can include a formal BIP in the next IEP. I've put my kids on informal behavior plans before prior to making changes to their IEP. I find it's a good way to find out what works/doesn't work before putting something in writing into the IEP that can't be changed without a lot of effort. I completely agree with you that we can't just say it's too much work to do an IEP meeting so we won't do one, but I wouldn't want to put a new behavior plan into a formal IEP plan without having any background on if it were going to be effective or not. I don't want to constantly hold IEP meetings to make minor changes.
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SpedinTx SpedinTx is offline
 
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Old 03-02-2018, 06:52 AM
 
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You need to have the general education teacher complete a ABC form. This form documents A- antecedent B- Behavior C- Consequence. It has to be very specific for it to be of value.

Example -

Do not do A- working on addition, B - threw paper on floor C was asked to sit down

This is not enough information it should be:
A- Was working on addition worksheet above his independent level, Ms Super Teacher noticed he was off task, Ms Super Teacher instructed student to get back to work
B- Student replied no
C - Was asked a second time to get back to work

A student was asked second time to get back to work
B Student stood up running around room screaming no
C Ms Second Teacher told student to sit down

Keep notating until student complies.

This takes a lot of the general education teacher's time. The ABC needs to tracked for 2 weeks every class every behavior, even if the student complies after the first request.

Once you receive the data you can use it to look for patterns such as:

Is it a certain person setting him off, is he becoming frustrated on work he perceives too difficult, is it a certain time of day, or a certain classroom atmosphere.

Until you can figure out a pattern for his behavior you can't write a BIP or a behavior contract
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