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candaloo candaloo is offline
 
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candaloo
 
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Demo lesson help!
Old 08-05-2008, 05:55 AM
 
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I interviewed yesterday for a Title I position (reading) for a 3-5th grade building. On Thursday I have to teach a demo lesson. I have been out of the classroom for 7 years raising my family. I previously taught 10 years of social studies to 6th graders....I did teach one year of Title I reading and math to 1st and 2nd graders before I had my first child.

On Thursday I must do a demo with 5 summer school students who are 4th graders entering 5th and are at least 1.5-2 years below grade level in reading. There are 3 boys and 2 girls. If anyone has any thoughts on what would be best....it is a small room with a horseshoe table, and no board....just an easel with a small dry-erase board on it. (No chart paper on it either I was told) Perhaps a reading game or other similar activity? The lesson need only be a half hour. I want the activity to allow for the students to feel successful, and have fun....but still working on their reading skills. Any ideas or comments are welcome!
Thank you!


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demo suggestion
Old 08-06-2008, 05:00 AM
 
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These are just my suggestions, no need to feel you must do them.

I find that the half-hour with reading kids goes quickly. You can do one activity for the half-hour or you can do more shorter activities. Without knowing exactly what the kids need, it'll have to be a general lesson.

You could read aloud from a picture book. This lesson would involve two comprehension strategies of visualizing and predicting. Show the students the cover and ask them to tell you about the book by predicting from the title and cover illustration. Ask them to predict certain specific keywords they would expect to see in the story. For instance, if you read Grandfather Buffalo by Jim Arnovsky, the kids might say "graze", "field", "calf", "herd". If you read a different book, the words would be very different. Write the words on the dry erase board as the kids provide them to you. Some smart-alecs might say words like "walk", "look", just say that the words could be in any book, so which words would specifically go with this book.

Give each student a paper and pencil, and have them fold the paper into quarters. Number the sections. Read a section of the book, have them close their eyes, and visualize a scene that is clear in their minds. Have them draw the scene. It has to be a quick sketch, give them maybe 2 minutes. Do this again, until all 4 quarters are sketched. Ask for volunteers to share their sketches, and you'll get a discussion about details (good comprehension!) in the story.

At the same time, as you are reading, you mark the words on the white board as you read them. Discuss how well they did in predicting the words that will show in the story. Discuss which other words they now know they could have said, once they've heard the story.

General things to remember:
State the objectives: "Today we'll work on comprehension, so you'll be better at understanding and remembering what you read. The ones we'll do today are visualizing and predicting." Review what they are, or check to see if the kids already know. This doesn't need to take a lot of time, but it does need to be said.

Laugh and smile and joke with the kids. They are the population of kids that need extra love, extra support, and extra encouragement so they take it from you. It might also relax you. Relate with the kids and ignore the adults watching.

Choose a picture book that is more realistic and less fanciful. They might be too old for The Three Little Pigs, but do very well with realistic children or realistic animals as characters. You could also choose the first chapter of an easy chapter book, but make it no higher than early 4th grade level.

Wrap up the lesson and talk once again, very briefly, about the objectives you covered.

Lucky you! I remember teaching a demo lesson for an interview, but I had 6 adults who acted like 2nd graders, and they were tough! I laughed a lot at what they thought 2nd graders would act like for me, and I got great marks on the lesson.

Good luck! Post here again and let us know how it went. If you are hired for Title I, remember to come here often for ideas and support.
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Thank you Mrs M
Old 08-06-2008, 06:39 AM
 
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Your suggestions are fantastic! I think I will be using it! I will post tomorrow after the demo to tell you how it went! Of course I will come to this sight for support and ideas once I'm hired! (Notice I said 'once' and not 'if'.....I have to stay positive, right?) Thanks again!
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Demo Lesson went great!
Old 08-07-2008, 02:56 PM
 
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Thanks again Mrs. M! The demo lesson was fantastic! I hope to hear back from the principal soon! Nervewracking....5 students and 3 administrators! I'll let you know when I hear something!
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interview
Old 08-07-2008, 03:32 PM
 
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So glad the lesson helped you. I remember interview seasons and I sincerely hope this was your last one ever.


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Help me get my foot in the door...
Old 09-16-2009, 06:05 AM
 
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Hi Mrs. M,
This sounds like a perfect demo lesson that you've offered up. I have just one question for you- when you're reading the book, and then pausing to have them do their drawings, do you send them back to their desks? I assume you're reading to them on the carpet, but maybe not. Maybe you could clarify the placement and orientation of what happens where. I have a demo lesson in Harlem this Friday with 2nd graders...

thanks,
C
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