Career Change to TitleI - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Intervention & Title I Services

Career Change to TitleI

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
jcc4
 
 
Guest

jcc4
 
 
Guest
Career Change to TitleI
Old 08-29-2011, 10:40 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Hi, I am considering a career change from engineering to teaching. I have tutored at the local public schools over the past years through outreach programs at work, which I have enjoyed immensely. After this past year of working extensively with my dyslexic son as he entered the school system, I really feel that working with small groups of children who are struggling academically would be a very fulfilling career.

I know that I would need to go through a teacher preparation program to receive my teaching license (I have a BA degree in physics and an MS degree in engineering), but I am wondering if this will be enough preparation. From many of the posts I've read, it seems that most TitleI teachers have been classroom teachers first, is this correct? I'd love to hear the experience of those of you who hadn't had prior classroom teaching experience before teaching TitleI. And for those of you that did have prior experience, do you think that if you had gone straight from your teacher training/university programs to teaching TitleI, you would have felt prepared for this. Do you see any major obstacles with going this route? I really enjoy working with kids, getting to know their learning styles, and figuring out the best strategies to help them learn. I don't know if I could do this while trying to manage an entire classroom full of students, so I would rather go straight into TitleI teaching.

Any comments would be much appreciated! Thanks - JC


  Reply With Quote

LaVerne LaVerne is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 719
Senior Member

LaVerne
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 719
Senior Member
My experience
Old 08-29-2011, 05:08 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I was a regular ed 5th grade teacher for 20 years before I switched to Title Reading for upper elementary. For myself, it has been very valuable to know what is expected of the kids in their classrooms and the curriculum they study. I also know what to expect from the age child I am dealing with. I knew the literature of this level well so helping them find books to fit their needs has been easy.

However the actual teaching of reading has not hinged on my working in regular ed first with teaching reading to students. Knowing a great deal about reading and all of its many areas and how it all works together can be learned with lots and lots of reading and thinking and practice. I find the whole process in the brain fascinating and always have.

As with any job however experience is valuable but not always an absolute necessity. It sounds like you have the heart and the ability to read, learn, and search to find the answers to questions that may arise. This is a very important part of teaching, in my view. I don't think I would let you inexperience stop you. I have loved most of my 26 years as a teacher....not every day...but most...and the rewards can not be measured in dollars but in the heart.

Good luck in your decision. Hope this was helpful.
LaVerne is offline   Reply With Quote
jcc4
 
 
Guest

jcc4
 
 
Guest

Old 08-29-2011, 06:59 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Thanks so much for your response. I can see the huge advantage in knowing in great detail the depth and breadth of the content covered at each grade level and knowing the level of understanding you are trying to help the students to achieve. Hopefully, in working closely with the classroom teachers, along with time spent within the classroom observing and working with students, I can overcome the lack of experience.

I, too, find the process of learning to read, write, and think mathematically fascinating. These skills came easily to me, so I had never given much thought as to how I had learned them. In working with my son this year, I ended up doing quite a bit of research on the skills in which he was showing weaknesses and found the number of sub-skills the brain has to integrate to achieve fluency in these areas amazing. When looking through his eyes, I found myself often asking "How can anyone possibly learn all of this?". A weakness in just one sub-skill can throw off the entire learning process, and my son has difficulty with multiple sub-skills.

I really did enjoy researching a multitude of methods to teach struggling students from many different sources: research papers in distinguished journals, websites created by various institutes/foundations, tips from experienced educators, blogs from parents who had come across something that worked for their child. It opened my eyes to the wide array of issues that may be preventing students from reaching their potential and also reinforced the fact that one teaching method will not work for every child. I also enjoyed the creative aspect of integrating these methods into fun games that my son would want to partake in after a full day of school (sometimes a real challenge!). I knew I had success when both he and his little brother would beg to play one of my games before bed. Seeing them excited about learning and enjoying themselves while doing so was definitely rewarding!

Thanks again - JC
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Intervention & Title I Services
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:55 AM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net