Drawing - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Substitute Teachers

Drawing

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
XXXXX
 
 
Guest

XXXXX
 
 
Guest
Drawing
Old 11-06-2009, 04:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I was subbing last week in a 4th grade class of the school where I retired. When some of the students finished their work I told them they could read. They, the whole class, told me that the teacher lets them draw when they finished. ( I know from past experience that this is true)
This school has low test scores and they have been working very hard to improve. I feel like the principal should know this teacher's policy. Should I tell him, let it go, or talk with the reading coach?


  Reply With Quote

Rerun's Avatar
Rerun Rerun is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 66
Junior Member

Rerun
 
Rerun's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 66
Junior Member

Old 11-06-2009, 05:51 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I want you to know, that I have no business trying to tell anything to a retired teacher. I'm always in awe of you folks. But, almost the first thing I was told (by a Master Teacher), is to have a Language Art activity ready to go a filler. Instead of mindless scribbles, they would accomplish something new. In your note to the teacher, keep it positive and tell her/him that you had a "perfect" activity for that short down time and tell her/him how well it worked. You might get a convert. Having them draw (scribble) is obviously a copout and may the teacher is stumped and just wants them quite for a while. Just my 2 cents.
Rerun is offline   Reply With Quote
subczy
 
 
Guest

subczy
 
 
Guest
hmmm
Old 11-06-2009, 06:07 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I would stay out of it. It is not my place. (curriculum is a very hot button at our schools)

However, when I am in charge we do things my way. If ther eis free time and it doesn't say int he plans what to do then I take care of it.

Now, that is to say I have done drawing. However, it isn't - hey you guys can draw...it is a mini art lesson (I love art). I had this happen in Kindy a few weeks ago. We had 20 min to fill (go figure). So we had read a book w/ an animal character earlier in the day. So I let them through choosing what they would be if they were an animal. I showed them on the board how to draw seom basic animal shapes such as the eyes, whiskers, mouth, etc and and we also had to write the letter of the day on the paper. Some took the drawing help to heart, others were just new to drawing and had the classic scribbles but it was a lesson I took it as in depth as I could w/ kindy kids w/ limited english skills and went w/ it.

In older classes I'd have them relate their drawing to a character in one of the materaisl they are reading in class. A favorite one is what if that character went to school with you. How would they look? Draw a dialog bubble and what would they say? What would other kids say about them? What woudl YOU do about it? Many like this b/c I will tolerate their gang tag type font if they have all the elements int ehir story board type picture.

So, for those of you who don't have a mini LA activity prepared and you go the art route, put some thought into it. Give them a direction. Good luck! (I'd still stay out of the curriculum business)
  Reply With Quote
gottaread's Avatar
gottaread gottaread is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 439
Senior Member

gottaread
 
gottaread's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 439
Senior Member
Yes!
Old 11-06-2009, 07:26 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I can't believe you posted this. I have been meaning to post the exact the same thing! I am almost done with the requirements to add a reading endorsement to my license and this year I am subbing. I have taught eled for many years...

I have been completely APPALLED by hearing the exact same thing in many classrooms. Second, third, and fourth graders who insist that when they are done with their work they can draw. I tell them their options are to read a book of their choice or to write in their journals. They pout. They don't WANT to read or write...and the underlying message is that I am 'mean'. After all, their teacher lets them draw anytime they want. And this goes on all day long. Their desks are filled with scribbled drawings.

The schools where this has happened have very low test scores. Kids need to read as much time as possible EVERY day, in school and at home. Research shows that this is the single most important activity that will improve reading ability, which of course extends to all subject areas.

So, I will stand my ground and give them the option to read or write. Period. Guess I'm just a big meanie!

To answer your question, I would speak with the reading coach and let the reading coach approach the teacher. I wouldn't drop this on the teacher directly. The reading coach is in a perfect position to influence the teacher's behavior and keep you out of the line of fire and politics. As subs we walk a fine line.

Last edited by gottaread; 11-07-2009 at 03:45 PM..
gottaread is offline   Reply With Quote
XXXXX
 
 
Guest

XXXXX
 
 
Guest
Drawing
Old 11-06-2009, 08:52 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

The days I was there, it was no drawing. But it was a struggle and there was pouting ,too.
The school has a great AR program, but these kids told me they didn't want to participate in it. I can't figure out why they have an option.


  Reply With Quote
Rerun's Avatar
Rerun Rerun is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 66
Junior Member

Rerun
 
Rerun's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 66
Junior Member

Old 11-07-2009, 03:22 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Gottaread: You are my newest best friend!!!! My district has distinctly different schools. Those with the lowest learners are the scribblers and those with the highest scores are readers. Now I don't know the correlation, but there is obviously something going on in one school that isn't in another.
Rerun is offline   Reply With Quote
wnlbutterfly wnlbutterfly is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 634
Senior Member

wnlbutterfly
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 634
Senior Member

Old 11-07-2009, 07:22 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

What a good observation and why is it teachers don't see this? I mean of course those teachers that are allowing the drawing as a filler instead of reading.

Our school has started the Reader's Workshop, so the rule is basically if you are done with other work, you should be reading. I remember when they only got 20 minutes of SSR time a day, now we have nearly an hour and a half set aside for reading time. That is great for the students that are good readers, but a struggle with the other children that don't like to (a struggle in that you have to constantly be watching to keep them on task).

You just have to be the meanie and say "sorry, your teacher isn't here today, this is what we are going to do".

I have been in the same classroom over a month now and I still hear the "Mrs. X lets us...", and I say that is fine when she comes back.

I had a teacher tell me once that it is good for students to have a sub and mix things up a little, get them out of their comfort zone. I have always tried to keep things pretty much the same routine when I sub, but now I don't worry as much about it. I think for teachers the bottom line is did they get the lessons done.
wnlbutterfly is offline   Reply With Quote
XXXXX
 
 
Guest

XXXXX
 
 
Guest
To talk or not to talk?
Old 11-07-2009, 07:55 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

SO....
Do I talk to someone about this teacher letting them draw so much?
I feel like these children are being cheated. It really bothers me. I could just not sub in this room again, but the students are still missing out.
  Reply With Quote
gottaread's Avatar
gottaread gottaread is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 439
Senior Member

gottaread
 
gottaread's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 439
Senior Member
Don't address this with the teacher...
Old 11-07-2009, 08:13 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

...it's a bigger issue. Speaking with the teacher will only tick off the teacher and likely get you banned from her classroom or even the school! Speak with the reading coach. If you want to speak with the principal, go in armed with copies of research and discuss in general terms, that you have 'observed' that many kids are told they can just draw when they have free time. Look up the research by Tim Rasinski and Nancy Padak on helping children develop as readers. (I am fortunate to have studied for my master's with both of them...they are awesome!) Read the 2000 Report of the National Reading Panel. Give your principal a copy and suggest that the M.O. (modus operandi) of all teachers in an elementary school setting (and middle school!) is that free time is spent reading a book of their choice.
gottaread is offline   Reply With Quote
gottaread's Avatar
gottaread gottaread is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 439
Senior Member

gottaread
 
gottaread's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 439
Senior Member
Rerun
Old 11-07-2009, 08:20 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

Backatcha! <>

Reading also develops vocabulary. Wide reading begets more skill, and more desire to learn! The more kids read, the better they get at it, the more success they feel as readers, which makes them want to read MORE. School is supposed to be a place where learning is the primary focus of the day. We spend way too much time giving in and letting kids do exactly what they want! Drawing (when not part of an art class and not part of a reading/writing lesson) has little to no value. I see this with my own kids, and we are in a very good school system! I tell my own kids that their "job" is to be a student and work hard...not to play all day. My job is to be a good teacher. My husband's job is to be a good engineer. Schools (and teachers) don't exist to be extended babysitting services!



Last edited by gottaread; 11-07-2009 at 03:47 PM..
gottaread is offline   Reply With Quote
thordau4's Avatar
thordau4 thordau4 is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 537
Senior Member

thordau4
 
thordau4's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 537
Senior Member

Old 11-07-2009, 08:57 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

I'm so glad I read this thread. The drawing plea comes up every time I say "when you are done with your work, read quietly to yourself". I don't know why I ever hesitate when it's time to insist on reading over drawing! Going forward, I'll respond with firmness about READING!

I'm going to etch this from gottaread into my brain:
"Kids need to read as much time as possible EVERY day, in school and at home. Research shows that this is the single most important activity that will improve reading ability, which of course extends to all subject areas."

THANKS!
thordau4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Rerun's Avatar
Rerun Rerun is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 66
Junior Member

Rerun
 
Rerun's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 66
Junior Member

Old 11-07-2009, 09:46 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

One suggestion for the students who are just a little older, maybe 4th and above, is the use of magazines. I've been collecting several magazines with different articles of a variety of subjects. Magazine articles are viewed a quicker and if I can get their attention onto something they "really" like, they seem more agreeable to sitting and reading an article about their passion. Some of the books they haul from the Library, I know they will never read, so I get them exited about their interests and go from there. If I don't have what they need, we learn how to research a little better on the computer and read an article online. It's more fun for them and me and reading is reading.
Rerun is offline   Reply With Quote
yoohoo yoohoo is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,466
Senior Member

yoohoo
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,466
Senior Member

Old 11-07-2009, 11:12 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

the things the kids get away with...I was subbing in MS the other day (can't tell you which level) but as soon as some of the kids were done with their work they would pull out paper and start drawing...WAYDAMINUTE!!!!! it's bad enough these kids are sturggling to even read a paragraph aloud!....

I gave them the same ultimatum---when you're done with your work you can read or I can find some other work for you and it won't be fun...

Oh, I got a lot of "well, so and so teacher allows us to draw"....and as usual I have them the same speech, "I'm not so and so and when they're back you can let so and so teacher I said this and I will write this in my report too." I also said, "The more you read the better writers you become." "So crack those pages open!!!"

ALot of sad faces all around
yoohoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Ball Three Ball Three is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 315
Suspended

Ball Three
 
Joined: Sep 2009
Posts: 315
Suspended
"The Book Whisperer"
Old 11-07-2009, 02:09 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

I read a lot, but I know little about teaching reading.

However, I recently found the above-mentioned 2009 book (by Donalyn Miller, who teaches 6th grade) which makes a lot of sense to me and gave me a start on the subject. The author doesn't have a Ph.D., but the book has endorsements from some people who do, and it goes into detail on much of what has been said by PPs. Those of you who, like me, are not trained as reading teachers might find this book helpful and inspiring.
Ball Three is offline   Reply With Quote
Squiggly Squiggly is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 200
Full Member

Squiggly
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 200
Full Member
My dd's teacher
Old 11-07-2009, 02:57 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

lets them draw as a filler and it infuriates me. What a waste of class time for the quick finishers. As a sub, one of my filler activites was to pull the class vocab list and tell them when they were done with their work they could free read. The person who found the most vocab words in their book could get a little prize. They could just make a list--mangled, pierce, apple, etc. I have holiday erasers and pencils in my kit and the winner would get one of those. I was also mean though and if I repeated in a class that gave me a hard time about reading I would just make it an assigmnment like it was from the teacher and write a generic journal question on the board to answer after they read two chapters of their free read book.
Squiggly is offline   Reply With Quote
gottaread's Avatar
gottaread gottaread is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 439
Senior Member

gottaread
 
gottaread's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 439
Senior Member
thordau4
Old 11-07-2009, 03:50 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

Glad to help! This has become my personal mission in life. It is so important. Maybe if every sub here on PT starts a quiet revolution, we can make some changes in the lives of the kids we teach. Go get 'em!
gottaread is offline   Reply With Quote
Amberlee's Avatar
Amberlee Amberlee is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 608
Senior Member

Amberlee
 
Amberlee's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2009
Posts: 608
Senior Member
Actually
Old 11-07-2009, 05:49 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

I would like to respectfully disagree with most posters on the possible response to the situation. While I agree that reading is better than drawing, going over the teacher's head may not be the way to do it.

In the area where I teach it is a breach of the code of ethics put out by the teacher's federation to go over someone's head without first trying to talk to the person involved. I wouldn't want someone to hear about what I was doing without having been consulted first. Sometimes people don't realize what they are doing. Other times they might change what they are doing.

It wouldn't be easy to talk to the teacher by any stretch of the imagination, but you need to be aware of... does 'tattling' sound too bad?
Amberlee is offline   Reply With Quote
gottaread's Avatar
gottaread gottaread is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 439
Senior Member

gottaread
 
gottaread's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2009
Posts: 439
Senior Member
Amberlee...
Old 11-07-2009, 06:49 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

I have taught for many years and am very familiar with teacher's unions.

I'm not talking about going over anyone's head, and certainly not a breach of any code of ethics. In fact, if you read my posts, you will see that I suggest that this isn't about any one teacher. This is not about 'tattling'. My suggestion is to make the case by providing information. In point of fact, I do NOT suggest making this about one particular teacher. Many teachers in schools today do not have a strong background in literacy education, through no fault of their own! This is an ongoing discussion in universities: there is a need to strengthen (and perhaps lengthen) the literacy training that undergrads in teacher education programs receive. However...lack of knowledge of best practices in literacy education among teachers should not be ignored.

Most teachers I know would not take hearing this from a 'mere sub' with any grace. More than likely, they would take it as a criticism and shut down, missing the message entirely. Education is about the children. We all have a responsibility to do what's in their collective best interest.
gottaread is offline   Reply With Quote
Lakeside's Avatar
Lakeside Lakeside is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,888
Senior Member

Lakeside
 
Lakeside's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,888
Senior Member

Old 11-09-2009, 08:21 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

Oooh, I love the idea of finding their vocab words in their extra reading!! I do usually have some little prizes with me. I'll definitely have to try that.

I've come across classes that automatically go right for their books, and classes that look at me as if I have two heads when I suggest it. I think it varries greatly by classroom teacher.

I also like the idea of giving them an assignment if drawing is allowed. Depends on the age, but some of my favorites from art classes are:
1) Here is a famous painting; change the background in an interesting way, and make the details of the subject match. (The subject should still be recognizable.)
2) Imagine your locker is the door to another world. Draw what's inside.
3) Tape a puzzle piece (that the student doesn't recognize) to the middle of the page. They draw the rest of the picture.
4) or allow free-drawing, but make them write an x-sentence caption to go with it.
Lakeside is offline   Reply With Quote
Finemind
 
 
Guest

Finemind
 
 
Guest
There is nothing wrong with drawing...
Old 11-15-2009, 05:59 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

I disagree with those that think drawing is wrong in the classroom. Drawing engages the imagination, gets the students to think outside the box, gives them a break from book work and teaches them valuable life skills. Afterall, there are many jobs out there today that require a good imagination and drawing skills. By being upset that they are able to draw you are saying, in a way, that art is not important. You are wrong. I am an art teacher/sub and I often encourage my students to draw when they have free time. I usually get looks of amazement as the teachers never let them draw which is sad. A lot of times I ask them to draw something and then write a story below it telling about the drawing. I know when children draw they are totally engaged in the activity and they often are so excited about their pictures that they just have to share them with others. What can be better than the children working on something they are excited about?
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Substitute Teachers
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:18 PM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net