MS and HS - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Substitute Teachers

MS and HS

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
newsubstitute
 
 
Guest

newsubstitute
 
 
Guest
MS and HS
Old 11-19-2009, 04:44 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I have only been subbing at the elementary level. (k-4) This is where I feel most confident and where my desire to teach lies. They are really needy at times but sweet. However, it is becoming very apparent that most of the jobs I see listed on Aesop are mostly in MS and HS. I personally hated MS when I was a teenager and don't even want to go back to be a substitute. I remember the kids were so mean and could get out of control. Also subbing at the HS level sort of intimidates me. I have no idea what to expect. All I remember is when I was in HS and we would have a bell shcedule every 50 mins or so for each class. Also it is easy for me to talk to the younger kids and be the authority but I feel like I wouldn't know how to talk appropriately to HS kids. Can you describe your first expereinces and maybe the difference between Elementary subbing versus MS/HS kids? It would be helpful!


  Reply With Quote

thordau4's Avatar
thordau4 thordau4 is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 537
Senior Member

thordau4
 
thordau4's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 537
Senior Member

Old 11-19-2009, 07:17 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I like HS. Tone down the "bossy", Tune up the friendly but still firm. You are not expected to know the subject - or remember them!

The sub plans usually involve work sheets, computer lab time, showing a movie related to the subject. Elementary school is more teaching and some classroom management. MS is all classroom management and maybe 2 sentences of teaching. By HS, students have calmed down quite a bit. They usually are over the desire to be famous for being unruly.

HS students are "young adults" and can be interesting to meet and talk to. I do a seating chart so I can match names and faces. It's easy to act like I like them and they respond well. In MS, I do seating charts so I can call them by name to redirect them. It tips the scales my direction. It is still very intense. I don't do middle school very often. My worst times in HS were with students who were fresh from MS.

In Elementary, it's OK if they don't know you. You can still have a great day with them. In HS, it helps when they have become familiar with you, but you can still have a great day with them when you are new. In MS, sometimes even being familiar with you doesn't tip the scales enough in your direction! But then, I don't do MS enough for them to really get familiar with me.
Try HS, you could love it! Let us know how it goes!
thordau4 is offline   Reply With Quote
barbara s
 
 
Guest

barbara s
 
 
Guest
My take on MS
Old 11-19-2009, 07:56 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Let me say that my situation is way different because I work in a parochial middle school, not public. Anyway, most of my sub gigs this year have been middle school. I did my student teaching waaaaay back in the Dark Ages in 8th and 9th and swore I'd never do middle school again; I wanted elementary. But I'm really having a good time in MS and thinking seriously about pursuing it for a full-time job. I need less prep time (i.e., pre-student morning scramble) because I'm teaching the same subject and lesson several times, so there's less to figure out before the kids show up. I can refine the routine as I go because I learn the pitfalls from the first class. I get a REAL planning break and lunch break. Some days I get two class periods off. Whee! I have to sit with my elementary kids at lunch, so no break there. I do sometimes have lunch/recess duty in MS, but that involves sitting and watching, no real active work. I've also done lunch detention, but even that was easy. And while I can't say I'm an expert, I'm finally getting a handle on classroom management, so my classes are running much better, I'm more relaxed, and we're getting more done. (I do get the weird MS hijinks, though!) Now, again, I'm in parochial school, so the situation is different. But you might check out middle school. It could be a great opportunity for you.
  Reply With Quote
lovetosub's Avatar
lovetosub lovetosub is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 478
Senior Member

lovetosub
 
lovetosub's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 478
Senior Member
I love subbing in HS and MS
Old 11-19-2009, 02:02 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

but I am sarcastic by nature -- not something that would do well at the elementary school level. Maybe give it a try, perhaps as an aide, and see if it's something you're comfortable with.

You asked for first experiences: When I sub at the HS, I walk in, "owning" the classroom. It's all about attitude and not showing fear. They can smell it. I'm stern right from the start, but tend to relax as the class progresses. If things don't go the way they should, I Do Not Beat Myself Up Over It. And I write detailed notes to the teacher about what happened, why and whom.

There's more, but I'm being kicked off the computer by my daughter who claims preferential treatment for homework. Oh well. Time for a second computer?
lovetosub is offline   Reply With Quote
yoohoo yoohoo is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,466
Senior Member

yoohoo
 
Joined: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,466
Senior Member

Old 11-19-2009, 02:29 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

pros and cons of subbing in MS:

-get out earlier
- get to teach only one subject and learn it inside out
- don't see the same kids the WHOLE day (YAYYY!!!) especially if the class was downright unruly
- prep/specials times (time to relax and work on lesson plans)
- if you excel in a certain subject you'll absolutely have a great time in MS
- some (SOME) teachers are really nice and go jout of their way to help you out
- admin. can be your best friend (treat them nicely)

CONS:

- if you have one batch of kids followed by another batch of sour kids (can ruin your day)
- some teachers treat you as if you're invisible
- some teachers feel that your class is their class and feel it's in their right to come in and scream at your kids
- sometimes, no lesson plans/incomplete lesson plans
- no help from administration if you have a problem student (i.e.: can't kick the student out/call down for help and nobody comes)
- eat in the teacher's lounge and nobody talks to you because they don't care to
- politics, politics, politics (be careful what you say and where----the ears are everywhere)
- DON'T MAKE THE SECRETARY'S LIFE H#LL...THEY'LL SEE YOU AS A BAD APPLE AND WON'T CALL ON YOU
- can be assigned one job and totally come in and be switched for another class/grade

OH MY!!!! Didn't realize how many cons there were.......


yoohoo is offline   Reply With Quote
subczy
 
 
Guest

subczy
 
 
Guest
oh my...
Old 11-19-2009, 02:58 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

I was so in your shoes last year. I went home every day of ms crying. Literally. I am not exaggerating. I ended up taking a job at the very same middle school I attended at the urging of one of my educ. teachers who also taught there as well. It has turned out to be a great experience. I think you should give it a try. I had worked previously with preK kids for about 10 yrs and thought I'd like that age the best, but I came ot find out during last year I really like kids who can take care of themselves a bit AND carryon thoughtful conversations. I love getting ot hear their gears turning.

I think another thing I am sure you are finding out is that how the day goes has a lot to do with the classroom mgmt of the teacher. THAT is what I consider more when chosing a class (when choices are avail of course lol) rathe rthan the grade. The reg. TEACHER is what makes all the difference.

Now, I am not saying everyone is gonna love ms and hs. And just b/c you CAN do it doesn't mean you WAN Tto do it, but I say try it. The classes I have found the easiest in general in ms are computer labs, gym, science, and library. Seems like kids understand the expectations in those classes across the board more AND they simply enjoy them more so behave better no matter who the teacher is. In the hs I woudl go for electives first if you can - things like home econ, business, and college and honor level courses. I find English the most difficult to teach in hs because our hs teachers have set up the rooms w/ couches and more discussion format OR they treat them more like college kids are treated - in that they are given their assign at the beginning of the week and they work on their own the other 4 days and you jsut are there to answer questions....well what that spells on sub days is play time...so it can be a challenge to get them on task, fun but takes work.

Anyway...don't limit yourself. Try it out. If ther eis a particular subject you enjoy do that. Beware fo the ms and hs kids trying to get you talking about personal life so you don't lecture or give them their work...and ENJOY them. they really are fun and it is so nice to spend a day not bent over tiny little desks, getting dirty w/ paint, doing recess duty, and reminding kids to potty and wash their hands.
  Reply With Quote
whatever's Avatar
whatever whatever is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,235
Senior Member

whatever
 
whatever's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,235
Senior Member
You can do it
Old 11-19-2009, 03:18 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

just decide before the first job what are absolutes for you and what are not...'teaching' will not usually be an issue...supervision will be a huge one...

In both MS and HS, I always went in and started firm--like the PP--and took care of housekeeping stuff--introduction, attendance, collecting HW if necessary, etc. Once that was done, I acknowledged that they were thinking that having a sub was like a day off and that I wasn't sooo old as (I was 38-40
at the time) to not remember that..."So I would like to propose a deal..." That said, I went down my list of non-negotiable absolutes
listening to the moans and groans a second then offered my compromises. I summed it up by going over the absolutes again and then telling what the teacher left for them. It sounds long but was only about 3-5 minutes most of the time.

My absolutes:
  • When I talk, they listen...I won't shout over them...I won't shout.
  • The noise level is minimum.
  • If the phone or intercom buzzes, or another adult enters, absolute silence.
  • No leaving the room unless it is in the plan.
  • Can't move furniture unless the teacher put it in the plans.
  • No using any of the teacher's things unless it is in the plans.
  • Stay busy--no sleeping.

Negotiables: [all dependent on the above being obeyed.]
  • I won't make them sit in their assigned seats.
  • They can talk at a low whisper.
  • They can work in pairs unless plans say not to.
  • I give the assignment, read the directions, etc. If they choose not to do it, I will not fight or argue with them. They are big kids now and know how this school stuff works. If I am supposed to pick it up at the end of the period and they have nothing--too bad--they can explain it when teacher returns.
  • ......
Most of the time, they are willing to work with me on that basis. I personally have never had issues in three years of subbing. Most of the stunts they try to pull are related to mixing up the seating, talking, passing notes, cheating, refusing to work--I effectively removed any possibility of any of those stunts working with my rules.

And I rarely have to get admin involved because of the power of peer pressure. If a few start to get too loud or disruptive, I may have to give one warning about them "blowing the deal" we made and the other classmates shush them into submission. Most kids realized it was boring with so few rules to break and gave in to do whatever the teacher asked.

It was a win-win-win for me because I had less stress and admin, students and teachers all liked me.
whatever is offline   Reply With Quote
Sublime Sublime is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,192
Senior Member

Sublime
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,192
Senior Member
Ms, hs
Old 11-19-2009, 06:25 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

I am lucky because the students at the middle schools and high school I go to are quite well-behaved. Therefore, it is almost always an easy day, sometimes even boring. Monday, I was in a high school where I did almost nothing for 6 periods (4 periods of a guest speaker, 1 taught by another teacher, and 1 where I just gave the assignment). The following day I was in a very noisy, low level 2nd grade which left me exhausted and thinking that free day in high school the day before was well-deserved. I like the variation, though I don't really like doing nothing all day.

I think if the student body is generally well-behaved you won't have a problem. You also don't have to converse with the high-schoolers, just give the assignment and supervise. They want to talk to their friends rather than the sub. Middle-schoolers are more sociable with a sub and are pretty funny to be around.
Sublime is offline   Reply With Quote
subopolis subopolis is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 37
Junior Member

subopolis
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 37
Junior Member

Old 11-19-2009, 08:20 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

I'll echo thordau4. I learned a long time ago in a different profession that middle schoolers are in the midst of "proving" themselves. High schoolers already "know" that they're better than you. So they care far less than middle schoolers do about, well, anything regarding you.

It's true, treat high schoolers like adults and they generally respond pretty well. Middle school? As much as you want to, as much as it's in your nature, you need to start very firm before backing off. My favorite thing to do with a seating chart (teachers, PLEASE leave current seating charts!) is to say, "Okay, I'm about to take roll from the seating chart, so if you're not in your seat, I will mark you absent."

You should see everyone immediately get up and move around!
subopolis is offline   Reply With Quote
Teachermom65 Teachermom65 is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 47
Junior Member

Teachermom65
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 47
Junior Member

Old 11-20-2009, 10:44 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

I love this approach! I've been doing something similar (but not quite as pulled together as your list!) and it works well. Probably b/c it shows that the sub has authority and things are not going to be a free-for-all that day. Even in tough districts, this seems to help keep the masses under control. I think the kids really want structure deep down, even if they aren't in touch with that overtly.


Teachermom65 is offline   Reply With Quote
Subby
 
 
Guest

Subby
 
 
Guest

Old 11-21-2009, 01:46 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

When you say Middle School, there are different issues for 6th and 8th. Or 9th and 12th.

Grades 7, 8 and 9 are tough. Their mother is about the only one who loves them and she has a hard time. Raging hormones. Puberty. Insecurity. They see themselves growing up and don't know how to handle it.

Sometimes you fail if you are overly strict. And you fail if you aren't strict enough. When a teacher doesn't enforce a seating chart, you are doomed.

Class size, arragment of desks (steer clear of middle school science classes where they sit around a table), proximity to the office, mood of the sub, backup (or lack of) from regular teacher, principal's expectations, etc.. all factor into the equation.
  Reply With Quote
Nuclear Sub's Avatar
Nuclear Sub Nuclear Sub is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 83
Junior Member

Nuclear Sub
 
Nuclear Sub's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2009
Posts: 83
Junior Member

Old 11-23-2009, 05:13 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

The bulk of my jobs are for middle school, and a few for high school.

I don't think there are shortcuts on how to get used to middle school and high school, but it didn't take long for me to learn how to adapt.

It involved some experiences that could have been handled better on my part, and the next time, I did! :-)
Nuclear Sub is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Substitute Teachers
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:09 AM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net