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Geohnny Geohnny is offline
 
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possible teacher's strike
Old 11-15-2009, 10:12 AM
 
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One of the districts I sub for may be having a teachers' strike in the next week or so. This is my first year substitute teaching, so I'm rather ignorant of what might happen if a strike occurs, so I have a few questions (I realize that every district is different, and policies may vary, but I would imagine that there are some consistencies between districts):

1) Will I be called in to "cross the picket lines?"
2) Do the striking teachers typically understand that substitutes are called in to take their place (in other words, I wouldn't be considered a "scab"?)
3) I have a long-term substitute teacher's license, would this situtation qualify as a long-term position (if the strike went on for any length of time?)

Again, I realize that every district is different, but I would love to hear from folks who have found themselves in this situation before. Thanks!

John


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Old 11-15-2009, 10:30 AM
 
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I don't have any experience with teacher's strikes, but from what I know of strikes in general, ANYONE who goes in to work for the striking members would be considered a "scab."

This topic has come up here before, but not in quite some time.

Good luck and keep us posted.
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In our district
Old 11-15-2009, 03:13 PM
 
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there seems to be a strike every 5 years. When the teachers strike there is no school for the kids. I am not sure if that is how it works everywhere.
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Not my situation, but...
Old 11-15-2009, 03:24 PM
 
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I taught years ago for Los Angeles some time after a big strike. There was still tension between teachers who had gone out and those who had not.

You might try to contact the teacher's union and ask (anonymously) what the policy is toward subs who fill in during a strike. You may or may not experience difficulties getting help with a situation if you become a contracted teacher in the future.

You would have to cross any picket line that exists outside of a school and I expect the teachers who watch you cross will consider you a scab. They may not be generous in requesting you to sub in their class after the strike.

Do you have any contacts among subs in that district with previous experience with this issue?

It might be good to be very busy in your other districts.
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Old 11-15-2009, 06:08 PM
 
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Around here there is no school when teachers strike - and parents get really MAD!


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Old 11-15-2009, 06:32 PM
 
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I have no personal experience either (although the teachers in my main district are now into their 3rd school year without a contract, and things are getting tense, so I've been thinking about this, too), but I've heard it is BAD for subs who cross the picket lines. Like, don't try to sub in that district after the strike is resolved, and don't try to get a job there in the future.

I've also heard that districts will offer subs 2-3 times their regular pay to cover during a strike. I guess it really depends on your circumstances and your beliefs as to whether that is worth it to you.

Personally, I'd be tempted (I am supporting myself on my subbing income!), but I don't think I'd do it. For one thing, subs are part of the union here. For another, my grandfather worked as a labor organizer during the Depression, and I'd feel like I was betraying my family history or something. And also, I AM looking for a job and want to stay in this area, so there's that.
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Old 11-15-2009, 07:31 PM
 
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grav, if the subs are part of the union then there should be no question but that you would not cross the line.
How can subs be part of the union? I thought that subs were "at will" workers, or some nonsense like that. Is that the term, I don't remember? I truly would love for the subs here to join the teamsters or another powerful union. Throw up a picket line and then see what the teachers, bus drivers and custodians would do. I know the bus drivers would not cross. I bet the teachers would.
One district here has not given subs a raise in over ten years now. That is why I do absolutely nothing extra. but as long as they get some of the rest of you to stay after school grading papers and sweeping the floor then I guess it is working for them.
What ever happened to that poster who stayed so late the secretaries had to tell him to go home?
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Would the reverse be true?
Old 11-15-2009, 07:40 PM
 
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"...For one thing, subs are part of the union here."

Do the subs get anything out of the new contracts? I suspect not.

Would teachers support a sub-teacher strike (ie: have school admins only sub and not allow the school to "call-in" subs.)? Again, I suspect not.

Would I cross for 3-4 times the normal daily rate? Maybe! It would depend what the union offered NOT to cross the lines.
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If you cross the line
Old 11-15-2009, 10:06 PM
 
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don't expect lesson plans!!!!
woohoo!
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Old 11-15-2009, 10:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Do the subs get anything out of the new contracts? I suspect not.
Actually, the sub pay rate is determined based on the regular teachers' payscale, so if they get a raise, I do too. (Not 100% positive on this, but I think it's 85% of the salary at the bottom of the payscale divided by the number of days they're required to work.)

Augustus, I don't know why we're allowed to be part of the union, but I am grateful for it. Apparently this is one of only two districts in my state that includes subs in the union. Probably not coincidentally, we're also the only district I've ever heard of that offers subs insurance (after you've worked the equivalent of 70 full days/school year).


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Striking
Old 11-16-2009, 03:22 AM
 
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If you cross the picket line, you're a scab. If substitute teachers here went on strike, you can bet the teachers would never cross their line. That's just the way it's done around here. Thank goodness.
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it is my understanding...
Old 11-16-2009, 08:22 AM
 
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in KS the teachers cannot strike (not sure why). I know they have delayed school starting before b/c the state didnt' have their education budget done, etc.

As far as a strike I would imagine they would call in subs if they could. In my dist. there simply aren't enough on a regular day let alone if most or all the teachers were on strike. I would go ahead and work UNLESS they included sub benefits and/or pay into their strike(which woudl probably end up getting cut anyway) I guess I'd probably end up working. Technically I am considered a pt employee for out dist.

However, I do consider MYSELF an independent contractor as I think that term better fits what we are since we are nto included in staff meetings for other pt employees, we are nto invited to dist wide meetings, we receive NO training, and we get NO benefits; additionally, we are free to work at other dist and in other towns. WE control our schedule and cannot be made to work on any given day or even agree to reassignments w/in a building. Soooo, for me I guess it all depends on what the tone of the strike was. If it would hurt my career as a sub down the road to be a "scab" then I would lay out (I have other employment as well) if it didn't then I woudl work (my kids are in this school dist kwim?) but what i would most likely do is begin working in anothe rdist in a nearby town and try to avoid the whole thing.

I am curious what they woudl strike over?
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Old 11-21-2009, 10:24 PM
 
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When I taught full-time, we actually had a "no strike clause" in our contract.

I substitute taught before teaching full-time, and one district actually took a small amount out of each day's pay (I believe it may have been $1-$3) for collective bargaining, but they didn't require us to become union members.
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scabs?
Old 11-23-2009, 10:58 AM
 
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There's a district nearby that is advertising for subs in the possible event of a teachers strike. They are offering quite a lucrative daily rate, more than 3x what I get now! However, I wouldn't go near that place if they paid me TEN times. The strike will be short lived and I'm quite sure I'd lose respect in my district and possibly fall out of favor. This is just my feeling, but I am not putting it to the test to disprove.

Subs aren't union where I live, and I am not even a certified teacher. You only need an associates degree to be a sub in this state. I do have more than that, but only a sub certificate.
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