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Testyteach Testyteach is offline
 
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Testyteach
 
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What would you do?
Old 01-20-2019, 12:28 PM
 
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Our district had us sign a letter of intent for next school year last week, and it's a nonbinding agreement just so they can begin to plan for next year. I put yes on it because I'm afraid they will give me a bad eval next time or nonrenewable me because they are mad at my leaving. I know it may seem like I'm silly, but I don't trust my new admin this year one bit, and wouldn't put it past them to do something like this. Anyway, there is a job fair next weekend that I thought I'd stop in for and put out my interest with my cover letter and resume; however, I'm afraid they may try to contact my principal. How soon should I resign, and give notice that I don't plan on returning? I really need to move at the end of this school year, and relocate to the place where the job fair will be. I am thinking of proceeding with the resignation shortly after the job fair, as I see that there is like no possibility at all I will be returning. Would giving them my resignation notice for the 2019-2020 school year be too soon to give yet? What do you think? At least then they couldn't nonrenew me, and they wouldn't be shocked if somebody called them with questions about me.


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MrsPhysics MrsPhysics is offline
 
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Hmm thatís tricky
Old 01-21-2019, 01:39 PM
 
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I would think that most admins would be appreciative of getting extra notice for planning purposes, but I know there are some wacky proncipals out there.

If I was 100% certain I was leaving and could blame it on moving (instead of just hating the work environment - no hard feelings) I guess that I would let them know ASAP, and try to get a letter of recommendation from someone too.

I donít think there would be any reason for them to get angry or go for retribution against you, but maybe Iím missing something. They may treat you a little differently though.
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dutchgirl dutchgirl is offline
 
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Old 01-21-2019, 06:42 PM
 
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I would put Ďyesí because I donít have anything else for certain. ĎDonít quit until you have a new contract signedí is the advice I was given when I was looking to move to a job closer to home. Tell them when the timing is best for you to tell.
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Haley23 Haley23 is online now
 
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Old 01-21-2019, 07:14 PM
 
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Are you 100% sure you're moving? Even if you don't get a job in this new location right away and need to sub? If so, I would resign now. Have a face to face conversation with your P, say many nice things about the school and thank her for the opportunities you've had there, and explain that you'll be leaving due to relocation. Ask for a letter of rec. I don't think it's "too early," especially if they sent out intent letters already. They'll appreciate the advance notice for planning, and if you're really worried about non-renewal, they won't be able to do that to you.

If you're not 100% sure, I'd wait until you have a new job offer. Last time I looked for jobs, when applications asked if they could call my P I put "Yes, as a last step prior to making an offer." Many schools are willing to work with those parameters. You can also ask in the interview for them to let you know if they'll be contacting the P so you can tell her first.

This past spring/summer I got a little more serious about looking for another position. I thought about checking the spot on the intent form that said I planned to move to another district. In general I like my P and felt badly that I was being "dishonest." Nothing panned out and I ended up back at the same school this year. Now I'm SO glad I never said anything to the P.
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Testyteach Testyteach is offline
 
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Old 02-15-2019, 07:34 AM
 
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Thanks for the good advice. I officially resigned and didn't get any acknowledgement from my p, so after at least a week, I called my association's lawyer. The lawyer said that even though I notified her, that she really has nothing to do with the resignation and that I need to inform HR and the superintendent. Anyway, I had to resign through them, and the only person that acknowledged my resignation was the superintendent. He wished me well with my move and my family. Then the next day the p finally e-mails me that she received my resignation and appreciates the early notice. I can't believe the inconsideration that I have received from this p. I am so glad I'm leaving, and hope that I have a more compassionate boss in my next endeavor. There's nothing worse than feeling like you amount to nothing. That's how I felt.


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