Need help consequences for 4 very disruptive students - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      The VENT

Need help consequences for 4 very disruptive students

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Hssj Hssj is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3
New Member

Hssj
 
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3
New Member
Need help consequences for 4 very disruptive students
Old 02-10-2019, 09:24 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

What are some consequences that you would give children that have adhd or are oppositional? By the way this is a G&T class with 30 kids. I have tried for 6 months positive reinforcement and given bands under the desks...balls to squeeze...special chairs to sit in...contacted parents...etc...nothing has worked. I should have asked for help sooner. Please give me clear consequences?

Oppositional child
Child getting up and dancing.
Refuses to do work
Told me she hates me (because Iím not strict enough and Iím too nice)
Calls out
Kicks desks
Tantrums

ADHD
Doesnít focus
Calls out
Draws in class

And so much more
Talks to people and disrupts them


Hssj is offline   Reply With Quote

Tiamat Tiamat is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,478
Senior Member

Tiamat
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,478
Senior Member

Old 02-10-2019, 12:31 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

What is the process for removing them from the G&T class and returning them to mainstream? The purpose of a special G&T class is to give those kids the opportunity to learn at their own level. If behaviours are disrupting that then, no matter how "bright" the child, they aren't ready to be in that class.
Tiamat is offline   Reply With Quote
Keltikmom's Avatar
Keltikmom Keltikmom is online now
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 7,022
Senior Member

Keltikmom
 
Keltikmom's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 7,022
Senior Member

Old 02-10-2019, 12:35 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I assume G&T means gifted and talented. Also, what grade level?

Have both of these children been identified and have qualified for services, or are they unidentifiable and you have to deal with them like regular students?

If they have not been identified as having a learning issue, I would treat them like every other student who breaks the rules. Then, document, document, document, so admin and parents start to see the picture.

If they have been identified,myth must remember they are not choosing to act this way. For ADHD child, a very simple, instantly rewarding behavior lan should work. ďSit calmly for this lesson and you get...Ē

Also, give them room to move, and try to let go of the constant moving and fidgeting. He is self soothing.

The oppositional defiant child needs more help,than you can give on your own. Seek out your school psychologist for strategies. Try to learn what pushes his buttons so you can redirect before he spouts off.
Keltikmom is online now   Reply With Quote
Hssj Hssj is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3
New Member

Hssj
 
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3
New Member
G&t
Old 02-10-2019, 05:17 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Thereís a test in NY that they take. If they pass itís up the parents if they want to take them out. These 4 children happen to be very smart. I wish one of my strategies helped. Iíve asked the social worker and psychologist for help. All their strategies have not worked.
Hssj is offline   Reply With Quote
Hssj Hssj is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3
New Member

Hssj
 
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 3
New Member
Response
Old 02-10-2019, 05:25 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I teach 3rd grade. The social worker is seeing two of them. The girl just started seeing the one who hates me. The other student is off and on medicine (I just sent her to a nutritionist) and the other childís mom said itís nit affecting his grades. Well now it is because Iím not redirecting him anymore. I am constantly redirecting these 4 children. I have 30 students...no Para. I try to have students help to refocus them too. Itís echausring and not fair to the other students in my class.

I need help with consequences. I thought I was doing this.
The girl who has odd told me she hates me because Iím not scarify enough. I definitely am more nurturing, but I donít allow disrespect. She didnít want any rewards. I pray for her every night. I need something to work.



They donít have learning issues...all behavioral. They are very smart.

Unfortunately Iím teaching test prep right now which isnít too challenging.


Please give me some behavior consequences for calling out. Sone other children are joining them. I feel like a failure this year. Having Lyme...being sick...working full time...giving it my all and then having to handle this is making me very upset and wanting to cry.


Hssj is offline   Reply With Quote
seenthelight seenthelight is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 655
Senior Member

seenthelight
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 655
Senior Member

Old 02-10-2019, 06:23 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Itís rough. Iíd start with one may be two behaviors. With kids like that, I find itís best to pick your battles and make sure you win the ones you pick. Once those battles are won, then choose another behavior to battle.

Iíd probably start with the dancing and work refusal. As long as she does her work, does it really matter whether sheís sitting or dancing?

Susie, you have a choice you can do your work (again doesnít matter if sheís dancing) or you can sit here quietly.
seenthelight is offline   Reply With Quote
chipmunky chipmunky is online now
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 775
Senior Member

chipmunky
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 775
Senior Member
Does your district
Old 02-11-2019, 06:34 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

create the requirements for the G&T classes? If so, this won't be a quick fix but might be something in the future. Maybe the requirements could changed to be more like my districts. To be in a G&T class on the elementary level, grades 2-6, students must pass a test, show higher level work in class and have teachers complete a check list of their behaviors to eliminate any student who could work on a higher level, but is not mature enough to take on the demand for independent learning and the challenges of the class to focus and attend to the lessons.

Other than that, my district would probably either call in the parents to discuss the issues and possibly remove the student, or have an aide assigned to the class. BTW-30 is way to high and enrollment for a specialized class. JMHO
chipmunky is online now   Reply With Quote
annie_g's Avatar
annie_g annie_g is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 4,560
Senior Member

annie_g
 
annie_g's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 4,560
Senior Member

Old 02-11-2019, 10:52 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

Instead of consequences, maybe you could try a reward program? I used to do punch cards with my class. Iíd go around in the morning after doing attendance, and if they were on task, theyíd get a punch in their card. At various times during the day Iíd use it to reward students for good behavior, too. After 15 punches they got a reward. The rewards were things like sit next to a friend for the day or lunch with a friend in the classroom, etc. This would be for the whole class but maybe it would motivate your behavior problems to follow rules. Just an idea since consequences donít seem to be working.
annie_g is offline   Reply With Quote
Kinderkr4zy's Avatar
Kinderkr4zy Kinderkr4zy is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 867
Senior Member

Kinderkr4zy
 
Kinderkr4zy's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 867
Senior Member

Old 02-11-2019, 07:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

For the ADHD child that is drawing-as long as they are learning I ignore it. I had one who drew all day but every time I called on him he could answer the question so I let him have at but I gave reminders that if his work did get done then I would take all drawing material from his desk. It never became a problem.

To the kid who keeps talking to and disrupting others, I usually target the "others". The ADHD student suffers from dis-inhibition and so consequences alone will not change this behavior because this behavior is not always a choice. Often its a symptom, like a cough, which as we know the child doesn't choose to have. I target the "others" by rewarding them for ignoring talking and off task behavior. In fact this can get pretty lucrative in my class and the kids get really good at it pretty quickly. Once the other kids dont fall into the trap of engaging they wont lose learning and once people arent losing learning it can fall into the "better to ignore it" category.


ODD-I purposefully ignore shout outs-they are so often attention seeking so paying attention to them reinforces them. I do not react and I call on others and reward the others for not calling out. It will reinforce to the class that it is better not to engage in shout outs. Some times I use nonverbal signals like putting a small yellow warning sign on the students desk and then if the behavior continues give the "consequence 1" pass. Sometimes this helps limit meltdowns that happen when you have verbal warnings and consequences.

The consequence for not completing classwork is simple-it becomes homework. I hand over unfinished work to mom at pick up and say that this is the unfinished work for the day and that it needs to be turned in the following day for credit.

The dancing is obnoxious but again it is probably attention seeking-likely the student want peer attention or giggles or to feel in control of the class. This is again where you target the "others" and reward everyone for ignoring. I have had an ignoring marble jar before and when the whole class totally ignored the misbehavior they got a marble and when the jar filled up the got cookies, but if you are the offender who is making us ignore you more than twice, you name goes in the jar and you are left out of the reward.

Otherwise consequences can be things like having to call their parent during recess and explain that they are having a hard time and get feedback from their parent on how to fix it. Or it can be writing a letter of apology during free time-1-2 paragraphs with a proper letter formatting and correct grammar and punctuation. Sometimes we have to have a recess goal setting meeting where the student and I workout a replacement behavior and we set a goal, like instead of tantruming they can write me an angry letter (I would much rather get a letter than says you're mean and I hate you, then to deal with a behavior and it is a step in the right direction towards controlling them response to distress) or use their "break card" to take a 2 minute cool down in the hall. I prefer consequences that focus time on thinking about what could be done differently in the future.

Last edited by Kinderkr4zy; 02-12-2019 at 06:20 AM..
Kinderkr4zy is offline   Reply With Quote
apple annie apple annie is online now
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,886
Senior Member

apple annie
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,886
Senior Member

Old 02-11-2019, 08:53 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

Quote:
What is the process for removing them from the G&T class and returning them to mainstream? The purpose of a special G&T class is to give those kids the opportunity to learn at their own level. If behaviours are disrupting that then, no matter how "bright" the child, they aren't ready to be in that class.
This would NOT be the case in my district. Gifted students are identified and have an IEP written for them. Their minutes with the GT teacher are not optional. Just because they're smart doesn't guarantee they behave. The gifted teacher is expected to deal with her students, not pas them off to a regular ed teacher. And regular ed students don't deserve to have their education disrupted either.


apple annie is online now   Reply With Quote
apple annie apple annie is online now
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,886
Senior Member

apple annie
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,886
Senior Member

Old 02-11-2019, 09:18 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

I have a student in my class now who is identified ODD. Most of the time, I try to give a direction and then immediately walk away. If I stand around and watch to see if he does it, or confront him him directly, he literally cannot bring himself to comply. I just act like I don't care. It takes him a minute or two longer than the rest of the class, but he usually does it. If he does something inappropriate, like blatantly blurting out, or pushing to the front of the line, I'll sometimes just look at him like he's crazy with an uncomfortably long silence. And then apply my classroom consequence if warranted. I do that silently, too. Silence works better than engaging.
apple annie is online now   Reply With Quote
tealsky tealsky is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 8
New Member

tealsky
 
Joined: Feb 2019
Posts: 8
New Member
research
Old 02-12-2019, 05:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

I highly recommend researching ODD. The ADHD is what really sets off the ODD. There isn't really a medical saving grace for ODD, so other than meds for the ADHD and awareness of adults on how to properly respond to ODD behavior, there isn't much help. That's the bad part. However, you can research techniques that help with parenting and teaching ODD students (I'd suggest the parenting part of that research, as there seems to be more info available, than for teaching, but a lot of the same concepts apply).

Wins:
1. Avoidance
2. Non-verbal signals (worked out with the student)
3. Breaks (laps in the hall, if nothing else available, to just remove them from a frustrating situation
4. Consistency, consistency, consistency, (not just with them, but with EVERYBODY else, they watch closely for any slides in judgement, or anything perceived as unfair).
5. Explain results of infractions ahead of time. Never come up with something as a punishment on the fly. If nothing else have a timeout spot "Thinking Area" for the child and let them know that when you see them getting frustrated you will ask them to go to the "Thinking Area" they are to use this time to calm down. If their is a "new" infraction that you haven't pre-planned a response to, tell them this area will be for them to go to while you think about what to do in the situation. Then calmly, never harshly, tell them or signal for them to go to the area. Honestly, when I've had students like this, that time was more for me and my calmness/sanity than for their own.

Is all this going to work 100%? No, sorry. However, it will help you to relax a little more in the situations, it can be very difficult to handle such a student. Best wishes.
tealsky is offline   Reply With Quote
Kinderkr4zy's Avatar
Kinderkr4zy Kinderkr4zy is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 867
Senior Member

Kinderkr4zy
 
Kinderkr4zy's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 867
Senior Member

Old 02-12-2019, 07:08 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

Quote:
Explain results of infractions ahead of time. Never come up with something as a punishment on the fly. If nothing else have a timeout spot "Thinking Area" for the child and let them know that when you see them getting frustrated you will ask them to go to the "Thinking Area" they are to use this time to calm down. If their is a "new" infraction that you haven't pre-planned a response to, tell them this area will be for them to go to while you think about what to do in the situation. Then calmly, never harshly, tell them or signal for them to go to the area. Honestly, when I've had students like this, that time was more for me and my calmness/sanity than for their own.
THIS!!!!!!!

And this too!

Quote:
I have a student in my class now who is identified ODD. Most of the time, I try to give a direction and then immediately walk away. If I stand around and watch to see if he does it, or confront him him directly, he literally cannot bring himself to comply. I just act like I don't care. It takes him a minute or two longer than the rest of the class, but he usually does it. If he does something inappropriate, like blatantly blurting out, or pushing to the front of the line, I'll sometimes just look at him like he's crazy with an uncomfortably long silence. And then apply my classroom consequence if warranted. I do that silently, too. Silence works better than engaging.
youre getting pearls here, I wish someone would have shared these pearls with me 10 years ago when these kids started showing up in my class-It could have save me reading about 5 books and several published articles on EBD.
Kinderkr4zy is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
The VENT
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:09 AM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net