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Push In Title in Elementary
Old 01-28-2019, 07:47 PM
 
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Our school may be going to push-in title one reading services next year. Iíve been teaching title for 6 years with pullout targeted services. What does it look like when pushed-in? Do you like push-in services? Why or why not? I donít see how push-in will be more successful, so I am gathering my data on the topic. Please help!!


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Old 01-28-2019, 08:04 PM
 
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Push In - stand awkwardly in the back of the room for thirty minutes because the teacher is doing whole group, and it is super inconvenient to pull students during core instruction. Time expires, and repeat.
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Old 01-28-2019, 08:32 PM
 
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This is all the rage in my area. My sped director has been trying to make us do it for years. This past summer, I interviewed for an interventionist (what title 1 is generally called here) position specifically to get away from pushing in. At my school no one ever suggests interventionists push in. I was told during the interview that their district rule is 50% push in/50% pull out .

I have seen a lot of push in/"co teaching" situations and not a one of them was anything I'd ever want to do. IMO, the teacher pushing in is always treated like an aide. The gen ed teacher teaches while the specialist keeps kids on task/manages behavior, helps kids who raise their hand, etc. If you're lucky you may get to pull a small group to the back of the room during work time to help them with a class assignment. In my college placements I saw many schools that even had one sped teacher per grade level "co-teaching" (so theoretically, doing more teaching should have been possible) and it still always looked like what I described above. Even when common planning time is available, gen ed teachers don't want to give up control of their classrooms.

Besides being boring as all get out, I don't see how it's possibly effective either. I think it sounds nice to other adults (it's "inclusive," kids aren't being "singled out," classroom teachers like that kids aren't missing their instruction) but I do not see how it actually meets needs. Helping a kid muddle through classroom work is nowhere near as effective as teaching a targeted intervention, especially when that targeted intervention is typically based on skills the student lacks but are no longer being taught at grade level in gen ed.

I've always said if I someone flat out made me push in (I've managed to weasel my way into all pull out for the past several years), I'd try to so some sort of "station teaching" where both the gen ed teacher and I were teaching small groups. IMO, it's still a dumb idea because instead of taking kids to my room where they can focus, I'm trying to do the same lesson in a loud and distracting classroom. Not to mention having to cart umpteen materials around everywhere and having to limit the activities I do so as to not make more noise/disturbance for the other students in the room. But at least I'd be teaching and not standing around.

Sorry for the novel. This topic touches a nerve for me!
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Old 01-28-2019, 08:54 PM
 
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What Haley said is 100% what I have seen.

My son is Sp Ed. and the funny thing is I used to be so "rah, rah, inclusion!" until I saw these co-taught classes in action. There is no co-teaching. There is one teacher teaching and the other sitting around maybe directing attention most of the time but also doing a little of what an an aide would do with assisting and answering questions during independent work time. We decided to go more "restrictive" for several reasons and low and behold, my kids makes growth and double the rate in a restrict placement than he does in a co-taught classroom.
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Push in
Old 01-28-2019, 09:43 PM
 
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Half hour before or after core instruction. During that half hour, small group instruction. In the primary grades it looks like daily 5 time would be used for two simultaneous groups (yours and the teachers).

Do you know what the instructional block looks like? If so, that might be helpful for knowing where and how you push in. Collaboration with the teacher will be essential in that model.


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Targeted intervention
Old 01-28-2019, 09:49 PM
 
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In terms of targeted intervention, our push in teachers use their own curriculum, but are in the classroom. I've seen it done with ELL students too. Pulled to the back of the room while guided reading is done and other students are making their daily 5 choices. Again, only seen it in K-2 so I don't know what it looks like in the upper grades.

All that to say, I think it can be successful if done in a small group type workshop. I have plenty of interventionist pull my students in the classroom to small group work while I teach small group. I love it.
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Old 01-29-2019, 08:43 AM
 
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We do push-in, and I've never seen someone stand in the back. We use the push-in time so that the classroom teacher and other teacher can both pull small groups at the same time. We have 4 reading groups and each group is seen every day thanks to the push-in. When they aren't with the teachers they are working on a center or computer program until it is their turn. This is in our K-6 classrooms.

If you have two teachers in the room, why wouldn't you be in small groups? It sounds like a lot of people don't know what appropriate co-teaching is.
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Old 01-29-2019, 11:52 AM
 
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My old district did push in Title I services. We all worked really well together. It definitely spoiled me because of how great we worked together. I now work as a Title teacher. I do pull out targeted interventions. It depends on the teacher you are with when you do push in services. In my experience with push in services (Title and Sped), we tend me be treated more like aides. Personally, I prefer doing pull out interventions. I get to focus on skills my students need and donít have to worry about what the classroom teacher wants. We were told that teachers canít send work from the classroom to complete during our 30 minutes and I like that a lot.
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Push in is not for me
Old 01-29-2019, 12:34 PM
 
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My two cents as a K-5 Title I reading specialist:

After doing pull-out for years, our district made the switch this year to do push-in. It is as TheGr8Catsby and Haley23 described. The scheduling is a disaster, although in fairness it is difficult to coordinate pushing into 6 different grade levels. For some grade levels, I push in during core instruction. Yes, I stand in the back, sit near students who I know will need extra help, and/or wander around trying to give assistance just like an aide. For other grade levels, I push in during Daily 5/centers, and although it is better, it is not really beneficial to the students. These students need specific, targeted instruction, and it is much better to pull them out to provide that instruction, not to mention have a quiet place without distractions from other students and the classroom teacher. Plus, I can only be in one classroom at a time. Due to time restrictions, I do not push in to all the classrooms at each grade level daily. So students Tier 3 students who need intense, daily instruction are not having their needs met.

If your district does implement push-in, and if you have any say in the matter, try to schedule it during Daily 5, centers, or other similar small group instruction time (as Penguin82 or Overlightnes have mentioned). In my opinion, itís not the best situation for these students, but it is better than pushing in during core instruction.


@ Haley23 - I read your post about what the intervention block looks at in your school. It was soooo good, it made me want to cry. I wish my school was as well organized as yours!
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Working great in my room.
Old 01-29-2019, 01:21 PM
 
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A couple years ago we went to this. A title Para was placed in each K, 1 or 2 room. Each early grade shares 'their' para with a 3, 4 or 5 class. It allows for lots of small group differentiated learning. The para really gets to know the kiddos she works with as well as the rest of the class. And I get a little help with management and emergencies.


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I really hate the push-in mandates
Old 01-29-2019, 09:35 PM
 
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We've been entirely push-in for Speech and SPED in my K-8 district for about 5 years now. I hate it. It's a reaction against pull-out, which was used poorly for many many years. When I started teaching, the SPED teacher would take "her" student out of your "regular" classroom and you wouldn't see him again for 6 hours. That kind of exclusion wasn't working, but instead of finding a reasonable middle ground, the pendulum swung the other way to inclusion inclusion inclusion.

My Speech teacher rebelled, and does push-in for some kids, particularly those who have language needs, and does pull-out for kids who have articulation problems and really need to work on certain sounds in a quieter, less distracting environment than the gen ed class. Our OT does the same thing, pushes in to help with writing for a little bit, then pulls out to help the student work on specific areas of need in a one-on-one situation.

As I said, we've been exclusively push-in for SPED for 5 years. In that time, we have seen a decline in the performance of our SPED students as measured by the state tests, so much so that we're now in a corrective year for failing to increase the achievement of SPED kids as measured by growth on assessments. At a meeting last week, our new principal was going ON and ON about how we HAD to get these SPED kids moving and the best way to do that was to have MORE PUSH-IN services. After the meeting, I asked one of our SPED teachers, gently, what she thought, and she said she hates it. I said, then why are we doing something that is hurting our kids, and she said it's coming all the way down from the state level, this blanket mandate to move to push-in.

Personally, I think it hurts our kids. Our older kids hate push-in, because what 13-year-old wants the "SPED lady" sitting by her during math class while she works on adding to 5 instead of quadratic equations? Our SPED teachers hate it because they're not really getting a chance to work with their needy kids or even to meet their minutes. There's also a serious element of dishonesty when it comes to being accountable for the students' IEP minutes. An IEP that says, "3 hours a week of help with reading comprehension in a one-on-one setting" doesn't at ALL translate to "The SPED teacher will be in your classroom for half an hour a week, working with a small group of 5 low kids". I've long thought that if we ever get audited for our minutes, we're screwed. Our Gen Ed teachers hate it because it requires more planning to effectively do something resembling co-teaching (I think co-teaching in general is a myth, most models just don't work in the real world), and some Gen Ed and SPED teachers find themselves working with someone who has a totally different style than they do, and it's hard to be an effective team when you're forced into something you both hate.

The decision about push-in vs. pull-out really needs to be based on individual student need. Mandating things like this hurts students and teachers.
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Old 01-29-2019, 09:59 PM
 
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When we did push in, title one teacher came to our room but brought the skill for title 1 students to work on. She would sit at a table with these students for 30 minutes and work on skill. I didn't like push in it was a distraction to my students who weren't in title 1.
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Old 01-30-2019, 07:37 AM
 
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I haven't read the other replies. We started push in a few years ago. I'm a classroom teacher and see positives and negatives.

Positives:
It's worked in as part of my Daly 5 rotations so the teacher comes in and works with the identified students as one of their "stations". I see them also either that same rotation or in another round.

There is one time per week it doesn't work with my schedule but the teacher either works with the identified students anyway either supporting what I'm doing if it's literacy related or just taking them to the designated area of the room to work on their literacy.

I have 2 certified teachers also trained in literacy to come in. No paras anymore.

It took some tweaking on my end to get my rotation schedule to coordinate but it works well.

They bring in all their own materials but also use the reading program books we all have in our classrooms.

I have designated spots in my room for them to work.

Students don't waste time leaving my room to walk elsewhere to work. No wasted learning time at all.



Negatives:
They gave me the specific times they come in. I had to work my schedule around them.

Only 1 student complains about working with them and not getting a "choice" during Daily 5. That one would complain anyway because they don't really want to work--just play all day--hence why the need to work with them.

They are there to help increase student achievement. It's not a distraction to us at all. Our students are used to teachers coming and going and these 2 don't make a big production of coming in. They enter and get to work. Other time is spent discussing the students. I'm working/they're working so we have no time to waste. We also use email to communicate.

I was leery at first, but I'm flexible and really had to get to that place that it's all for increased student achievement not my personal preferences. Some of my colleagues don't like it at all but we have no choice.
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I like Title, but not sped push in
Old 02-02-2019, 04:15 PM
 
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Title teachers here tend to actually want to teach something in the class which is nice. Sometimes they will take a reading group rotation or work with their 2-3 kids at a table. I have had it work nicely in the past.
Our sped dept takes aides and puts them in your room and calls it sped minutes. They do exactly as Gatsby's do: Push In - stand awkwardly in the back of the room for thirty minutes because the teacher is doing whole group, and it is super inconvenient to pull students during core instruction. Time expires, and repeat.
If you are unlucky enough to get 2 aides at once (extreme kids), the 2 aides visit w/ each other during this time. It is annoying and distracting. I have no clue how they have gotten away w/ this and called it " Sped Mins " for so long.
It is because the parents of these kids are clueless as to what is going on...It is a waste of money.
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Old 02-02-2019, 08:58 PM
 
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We switched from pull-out to push-in several years ago. Push-in really works well at my school. I plan my small group reading time for a time when the Sped and Title I teachers are scheduled to be in my room. My reading time is 60 minutes. They each come in for 30-40 mins of that time and see their targeted kids. I rotate through my remaining 3 reading groups. Anyone not with a teacher is doing centers (computers, ELA puzzles/games, independent reading). When the special teachers can't be there during testing, etc., their kids just join my reading groups and participate in more centers. I'm first grade. It works if everyone cooperates.
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Old 02-09-2019, 06:12 PM
 
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In my school the interventionist pushes in and takes a small group at a table while I do either whole class instruction or centers with the rest of the class. It works well for Kinders because it would take away instructional time if she had to pick them up and bring them to her room, all the way on the other side of the building.
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Co-Teaching
Old 02-10-2019, 08:44 AM
 
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I am English Language Development teacher who uses the co-teaching method. Here are my pros and cons list:

Pros:
1. I focus on building relationships with ALL students, not just my students. In my school district, ELD educators are allowed to build relationships and work with all students. I work in a low income school, where students can benefit from strong mentoring.
2. I can help teachers develop strategies to reach all students.
3. Students do not have to miss instruction. (Our Sped teacher pulls out up to half our of 5th class for a core subject, and the 5th grade teacher is struggling to ensure all students have the same lesson, since she is responsible for the state test scores. Her butt is on the line, not the SpEd teachers.)

Cons:
1. Students don't see me as a teacher.
2. Teachers don't get the co-teaching method, and many educators are stuck in their ways.
3. It's way too easy of a job.
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