Telling parents their child is not at grade level - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      The VENT

Telling parents their child is not at grade level

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Hawkeyegirl1 Hawkeyegirl1 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 152
Full Member

Hawkeyegirl1
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 152
Full Member
Telling parents their child is not at grade level
Old 02-05-2019, 07:02 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Our school policy is that students attend their conferences with their parents/guardians. I like to be up front with parents when their child is not at grade level. I find it difficult to discuss this with parents when a student is significantly below grade level. This is information is not a surprise to the parent. How do you handle this? Thank you.


Hawkeyegirl1 is offline   Reply With Quote

GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
GreyhoundGirl GreyhoundGirl is online now
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 18,437
Senior Member

GreyhoundGirl
 
GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 18,437
Senior Member

Old 02-05-2019, 07:30 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I just tell them what the grade level expectation is and where the student is. I also find work samples helpful so the parent can see how the student is performing.
GreyhoundGirl is online now   Reply With Quote
Keltikmom's Avatar
Keltikmom Keltikmom is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 7,056
Senior Member

Keltikmom
 
Keltikmom's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 7,056
Senior Member
Below grade level
Old 02-05-2019, 08:10 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

What gracekrispy said. I would add on, we could discuss this more privately at another time if you wish.
Keltikmom is offline   Reply With Quote
PrivateEyes's Avatar
PrivateEyes PrivateEyes is online now
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,635
Blog Entries: 5
Senior Member

PrivateEyes
 
PrivateEyes's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,635
Senior Member
I agree with the above
Old 02-05-2019, 09:18 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

If the child is there (and even if he/she wasn't) I try to sandwich the bad news with any good news I can first, and then move on to suggestions for improvement, without dwelling too much on the middle part.

Ashley has learned 18 new sight words since our last conference and moved up two reading levels. However, she is at a level 24. At this time of the year, we would expect her to be at a level 34, so she is about a year behind where we want her to be. Here are some suggestions that Ashley can work on at home to help increase her reading abilities.

If significantly behind, I might ask: Have you ever considered requesting that she be tested for learning delays? I do that because if THEY ask, we have to have a meeting in 10 days. If I ask, we have to try interventions for months before even looking at testing.
PrivateEyes is online now   Reply With Quote
eeza's Avatar
eeza eeza is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,722
Senior Member

eeza
 
eeza's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,722
Senior Member
requesting testing
Old 02-05-2019, 10:28 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

Quote:
If significantly behind, I might ask: Have you ever considered requesting that she be tested for learning delays? I do that because if THEY ask, we have to have a meeting in 10 days. If I ask, we have to try interventions for months before even looking at testing.
I know this is not quite about the main post, but THANK YOU, PrivateEyes! I'm a school psych and it's so hard when colleagues just say to ask for testing. It makes my job so much more difficult. We have a process for interventions but teachers would rather not put the work into the interventions and just tell the parents to request testing.


eeza is offline   Reply With Quote
Loveslabs Loveslabs is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2015
Posts: 699
Senior Member

Loveslabs
 
Joined: Aug 2015
Posts: 699
Senior Member
Testing
Old 02-05-2019, 01:28 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Heads would roll if we told parents to request testing! Thatís why we always have another teacher attend the conference if we suspect testing might come up. We like to have a witness to defend us if the parent says we said to just ask for testing. And that has happened before.
Loveslabs is offline   Reply With Quote
GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
GreyhoundGirl GreyhoundGirl is online now
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 18,437
Senior Member

GreyhoundGirl
 
GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 18,437
Senior Member

Old 02-05-2019, 03:36 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Weíre allowed to ask. Just because parents request testing and we meet doesnít mean the district has to test. It just means we have to have a meeting and discuss it. Personally I donít bring it up unless I have all my ducks in a row and KNOW interventions have been done, paperwork is done and and thereís a good reason to test (read: Iíve hit brick walls).
GreyhoundGirl is online now   Reply With Quote
Tiamat Tiamat is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,478
Senior Member

Tiamat
 
Joined: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,478
Senior Member

Old 02-05-2019, 03:48 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

I'm not allowed to suggest testing. If I have a concern, I refer it to my Principal and we discuss it. Then he and I together have the meeting with the parents, with evidence in place as to what we're seeing. They still have the option of refusing (hence the child we currently have in mainstream Year 4 with an IQ in the 60s - that was tested before he started school).
Tiamat is offline   Reply With Quote
Emily26
 
 
Guest

Emily26
 
 
Guest

Old 02-05-2019, 05:48 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

"If significantly behind, I might ask: Have you ever considered requesting that she be tested for learning delays? I do that because if THEY ask, we have to have a meeting in 10 days. If I ask, we have to try interventions for months before even looking at testing."

This would also be a serious NO-GO at my school. Suggesting testing might be required opens the school up to having to pay for said testing.

As far as the kids being there when you talk to parents, I think it's fine. I teach Kinder and they are always at my conferences. My kids know where they are. They know what reading level they're at and what their strengths and weaknesses are. It doesn't hurt their feelings or come as a surprise when I say to a parent, "Your child should know 80 sight words. He only knows 4," because they already know how many sight words they know. You can say it nicely, and be goal-oriented. "Henry is only reading 3 words a minute and the expectation is that he can read 12 words per minute by this time in the school year. Every child grows at their own pace, but fluency is something we're working on in small group at school because we'd like reading to become a little easier and more automatic for him. It would be so helpful if you can work with Henry on fluency at home, too. Here are some materials you can use to help him."
  Reply With Quote
PrivateEyes's Avatar
PrivateEyes PrivateEyes is online now
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,635
Blog Entries: 5
Senior Member

PrivateEyes
 
PrivateEyes's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 3,635
Senior Member
I think there's a difference
Old 02-06-2019, 09:20 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

between suggesting testing, and asking if the parent has ever considered asking for testing. I've never suggested testing. The conversation might go something like:

I am concerned because Johnny is reading at a primer level and he/she is in third grade. Here is the type of book he can read, and here is the type of book others can read. He is currently seeing me for an extra small group instruction on a daily basis, as well as his usual small group, and he is also being seen by our Title 1 specialist four times a week for thirty minutes. We've been doing this for the past four months.

As a teacher, it is now my responsibility to refer Johnny to our teacher assistance team. Under the direction of the team, we will continue these interventions as well as any others they suggest for a period of three months, meeting monthly to note progress. At the end of that time, they may or may not recommend that we take Johnny to a special education team, which may or may not recommend testing to see if Johnny is a child who is in need of special education services.

You do have the right, if you so desire, to ask for the special education team to look at Johnny to see if he is a child who may be in need of special education services. If you were to request such a meeting, it would legally need to be held within ten days of your request.

After informing the parent of the processes and their rights, the decision is up to them. I haven't told them to do one thing or another. I've given them the information to make their own decisions. I think that's fair.


PrivateEyes is online now   Reply With Quote
Summerwillcom Summerwillcom is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,450
Senior Member

Summerwillcom
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,450
Senior Member
Whenever I need to tell a parent
Old 02-09-2019, 03:58 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

something I'd prefer the child did not hear, I find errands for the kid to run for me. There is always something in my room that needs to be taken to the library, lost and found, or the office.
If the kid has to stay in your room, I ask them if they want to play their fav game on the computer. I keep the comps on and running during some conferences w/ headsets. This helps a lot when someone drags along all of the siblings too.
Summerwillcom is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
The VENT
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:51 AM.

Copyright © 2017 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net