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Question for Elementary EBD teachers
Old 09-04-2016, 02:01 PM
 
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I'm looking for someone to share some "here's what I do" ideas. I'm teaching my fourth year in an EBD classroom. This year I have 7 students. 3 spend almost all day out in gen. ed. classrooms. The other 4 are full time in my room. I've managed this number before and made it work. But this year I have a much wider range of abilities and grade levels, from a 6 year old who basically acts and thinks like a 3 year old, to a 5th grader who is super bright, but refuses to work independently. Throw in a 2nd grader who can work at a 4th grade level and a 4th grader who works at a 2nd grade level..... and all of them want 1 on 1 attention.

Anyway, I have a great idea of what to do, but then the reality strikes and I have one in full melt-down / refusals and 3 others who can't work at the same table because they HATE each other.... you get the idea. Anybody have tricks that they have found that work?


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Para educator?
Old 09-04-2016, 07:48 PM
 
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Do you have help? I think the first thing is getting some independent work time going for each one. Will they work alone for a prize? Can they work at a desk?
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Old 09-04-2016, 09:44 PM
 
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Do you have a program set up? (expectations, points sheets, rewards, consequences)

What is your grade levels? (I am doing K-4 EBD right now, talk about fun!)

Do you have a parapro?

Why are the 3 who are out all day in your class?

Lets talk more, i've got a ton of ideas for you, just need more details.
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I don't do elementary any more
Old 09-05-2016, 04:56 AM
 
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as I have moved into MS/HS but still have several grade spans and all ability levels.

I too could probably help more if I have more information.

I set up my room kind of / sort of using the Daily Five framework but incorporating math as well. When I was in the elem level, we only focused on reading, writing and math. I wanted "stations or centers" that were relevant without constant change, laminating, cutting out, etc. I had a variety of tables and seating areas around the room as well as my kidney table.

If a child came into "Resource" with social studies or science work, I/we (the paras) treated it like a reading comprehension lesson--as that was generally the best/easiest way to go about it without just telling the student the answers.

This set up allowed me to work with groups or 1:1 while the others worked independently. I hated feeling as though the other students were "waiting" on me. Everyone was engaged at their level on whatever it was they needed to work on.

Also, I would group them based on their needs and personalities, not the classroom schedules. If you have Junior and Suzy for math and reading pullout resource, but Suzy has math in the am and reading in the pm and Jr's is vice versa, do what works for YOU. The classroom teacher's schedule has no impact on your schedule as long as IEP minutes are met overall.

I'll check back if I think of more or you have specific questions.
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More Info...
Old 09-05-2016, 06:05 AM
 
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My program is K-5. I have a behavior program in place, with full behavior plans, point systems, rewards, consequences... you name it. That part I feel pretty good about.

I don't give a darn what the gen ed teachers do and when, I'm flexible. :-)

I have 2 parapros. There is always one out with the students in classrooms, and they're not my problem right now. They do require careful supervision so that they don't go into melt-downs - especially during PE, recess and their hated subjects. They have issues, ranging from running to throwing objects to lying on the floor refusing to do any work. I end up with one of them in my room about once a day, and of course when that happens I have to work to get them back on track.

I also have one para with me in the classroom about 1/2 the time. The other half is supervising our students at lunch / special / recess duties.

I guess what I'm struggling with will always be a problem in this type of classroom. Kids who can't work independently (after all, that's why they're in my room), and a huge range of abilities. Teaching routines and how to work independently is exactly what my job is. And once they learn that, they go out to the gen ed rooms - and I get move-ins and start all over again. Which is where I am now, since this is the beginning of the year and 3 of them are move-ins.

Here's my problem in a nutshell - how in the heck do you work with students with abilities and interests that don't match up who don't want to do ANY work, independently or not. I think I can answer my own question here: it's about the behavior and not the academics. I'm a behavior class. Until we get those under control the academics are secondary.

I really appreciate all your replies to this. It has helped me focus on what I'm doing, which is exactly why I asked for help.


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Forcing Independence
Old 09-05-2016, 01:51 PM
 
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One thing I would have you try is to force independence with work you know they can do. My morning starts with morning work, work I know they can do. With my kiddos, usually it is Kinder/First work. they have a binder and in that binder are their point sheets, morning work, self written goals, journals, and one empty catchall space. I have set the routine Breakfast, Pointsheets, Morning Work. No questions and very little change to that routine. I don't get a planning period so that is my quasi planning period.

Once my kiddos had that routine down, I started having them do independent work stations. I started with 1 or 2, but they all go the idea of how to do it with support from me or a parapro and then they were set off on their own. I do notice sometimes that they kiddos are not working on the task at the station and often times I will let them do this, not because I want them to fail, but because it mimic a regular classroom. The classroom teacher is not on them all the time to be working. But when I notice it I will restate expectations and remind them of possible point adjustments they will need to make if they were not on task. This holds them accountable.

With your kiddos that are in the gened classrooms full time, if they are having that many outbursts, should they be in the gened classroom for a full day. Also what does their LRE statements look like. If they are not in your class for the full day, can they technically have needs to justify a placement in your classroom? If they are in need of a Parapro as well, are they ready to be in a gened classroom full time. I know in the districts I have been in, it was rare to get a full time 1-on-1 para for a kiddo with emotional needs.

It all boils down to routines and getting the kiddos in a consistent routine you can always fall back on. You can definitely have academics in your behavior classroom, and you should, but you need to support them with routines.
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Old 09-05-2016, 06:05 PM
 
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stations

find out what they can do independently and make that their "morning work"

If able, put one on the computer, one at a math station or "fun" station, one with you and one with para, then switch.

think about what you could make independent. Maybe you could teach a mini-lesson then go back and have them do an activity from that.

do you have social skill books or cards? what about making matching games or file folder games that are indepedndent, fun, and academic. Could they journal about their day? Pose a question and have them draw or write about it.

Bless you!!! I did an EBD class for several years and it's NOT easy.
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Old 09-05-2016, 06:34 PM
 
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I taught K-3rd EBD for three years and it was SO hard to get them to do anything independently! One thing I did during my most challenging year was create work choice boards for my kids. For each subject area they had a hard laminated choice board that I could write on with a dry erase marker. They would have a section for me to write in two "must do" activities and then 4 "may do" activities listed below with pictures. My students were taught the routine that they HAD to complete their "must do" activities to get to the more fun "may do" activities. They also knew that they had to complete both must dos and at least one may do during that subject area's time block if they wanted to earn their break/reward time. I was able to differentiate the boards based on what each kid was working on/interested in/activities they went to in other rooms. I'm attaching a copy of it because it will be easier to understand if you just see it.
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File Type: pdf Reading & Math Choice Boards.pdf (627.4 KB, 23 views)
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