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ali74 ali74 is offline
 
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subbing in elementary Autistic class
Old 04-29-2010, 01:56 PM
 
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hi all
i have an assignment for an elementary autistic class tomorrow(grade level is not mentioned) I have never done this before and so i'm little nervous. How should i prepare for this? I usually carry class appropriate work sheets and stuff.I don't know what to take/prepare Please help!!


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Autistic Class
Old 04-29-2010, 02:11 PM
 
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Well..... I do this type of subbing alot and I also take care of autistic patients at my second job. You will have a para-pro and they will probably be running the show. They will like you as long as you offer to help whenever you can, never sit down, and follow all their suggestions and their lead. The autistic kids are there to learn life/behavioral skills. It is less about education and more about social skills. When I sub for autistic kids, for the first half of the day they will refuse to look at you and by the second half they will warm up to you. They don't make eye contact really, but some do. They say they don't like to be touched, but I have found that not really to be the case, but of course tread lightly. Some are on a plan for too much touching, so the para-pro will tell you who that is. Some will throw a temper tantrum for no reason and they will be encouraged to go into time out to calm down and take a nap. For part of the day, they will have physical therapy, which is called a sensory room. There is a sling they like to ride on and a sand box they pick plastic toys out of or scoop the sand and play with it. Bean bags that you throw to them while they balance on a balancing ball and a mini-trampoline to play with. They play for 10 min. and then switch. A lot of autistic kids have OCD like behaviors and they have to do things a certain way/ their way! They have to arrange numbers on cards and they do the same thing for spelling. All their activities are very simple. They practice the same thing every day. They laugh a lot for no reason and they like to jump and clap their hands at the same time. They usually eat separate because they can't handle the over stimulation. They love the swings on the play ground. Don't bring any worksheets just yourself and lots of patience. I don't mind the autistic kids, but sometimes it can be a little boring. Real simple routines. It's more like being a physical therapist than a teacher.
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Old 04-29-2010, 02:18 PM
 
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More of a mental prep on this one than a physical prep. If you haven't ever worked with autistic children, it will be an eye-opener. I assume as provided by law there will be paraprofessionals in the room. The day will mostly likely be led by them as I am sure each child is accustom to certain routines. Any change in routine can upset an autistic child.

Most autistic children will use PECS which is a way of communicating with pictures. However, there are those who are able to communicate without them. I don't know what your class will consist of. Also there are different levels of PECS and you may want to ask the para(s) what you can do to better help the day move along smoothly.

Be prepared for a stages of austism as it is a spectrum disorder and can have differing affects on different people. Some may need help with daily functions others not. I would suggest getting there with a few extra minutes than you are used to arriving and questioning the other adults in the room about what you can do/should do to help them through out the day.

Be prepared for a blessing. Autistic children I have worked with in the past truly are just that. Also be aware of your distance from children at all times. As I was once bitten severly by an autistic child...which reminds me I need to call and check when my last HEP B shot is due next month.
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thanks
Old 04-29-2010, 06:31 PM
 
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Thanks to both of you for the insightful replies. It really helped
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