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Surly Surly is offline
 
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Elementary Genocide Documentary
Old 02-11-2018, 03:53 PM
 
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For years, I've been hearing this term, "school-to-prison pipeline," but I never knew exactly what it meant. Also, because I work in a rural school district, I interact with a fairly homogenous population of students who, despite their own endemic problems, don't typically end up in prison. While browsing Amazin Prime Video, however, I discovered a documentary about the supposed school-to-prison pipeline and decided to watch it to learn about this supposed institutional trajectory.

It turns out that it is exactly what I feared: an absurd conspiracy theory constructed by certain segments of society to blame public school teachers for parenting failures. The basic idea is this: public schools intentionally "miseducate" and unfairly punish black students to fatten the balance sheets of private prison corporations. This paints rank and file teachers as either evil coconspirators or useful idiots; neither of which is true. What's left out of this, of course, is that certain demographics, namely blacks, are punished more because, statistically speaking, they commit more infractions, not because of some vast racist conspiracy. What are we supposed to do, let them do whatever they want with impunity?! Needless to say, I took great offense to the premise of this film, and I regard it as just another manifestation of the victimhood Olympics that seems to be so commonplace these days. Everybody wants to blame public schools, rank and file teachers, or somehow blame "the man" instead of taking personal responsibility. I'm not trying to offend or sound racist, but it really offends me to see my colleagues, almost all of whom care about kids and are striving to make the next generation better and make a positive impact with regard to college and career readiness, depicted as conduits in a conspiracy to send disadvantaged populations to prison.

End of rant.



Last edited by Surly; 02-11-2018 at 06:24 PM..
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Old 02-11-2018, 05:38 PM
 
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The only ones who are failing the kids are their parents. Care about your child, set a good example,and institute family dinners and family time.
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Maceola Maceola is offline
 
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Hmmm....
Old 02-11-2018, 06:45 PM
 
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I've heard a great deal about the school to prison pipeline, but don't know much about it. However, your comment about Blacks committing the most infractions is actually inaccurate, and it does sound quite racist. In fact, it is the only reason I've decided to comment.

The FBI reports after the fact data, as it relates to convictions. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports arrests, and 65% or more of those arrested are not black. However, within that 65%, many of the cases are downgraded and/or dismissed prior to appearing in court, or once in court. Therefore they never make the FBI database to accurately report the numbers. And, since Blacks collectively only possess about 2-3% of the wealth in the entire nation, it is reasonable to expect that they will not have access to adequate criminal justice representation. And the idea of them being tried by a jury of their peers is just a joke. I'll also add that several bizarre categories of crime are not included in their stats. that should be, and Blacks are not the ones overwhelmingly getting arrested for them.

All races commit violent, heinous crimes, but the fact remains that most Blacks commit poverty related crimes. Poverty that is the direct effect of slavery, yes slavery, land grants that they were denied, sharecropping, Jim Crow, redlining, gerrymandering, government sanctioned policies that kept Blacks from upward mobility and an unbalanced criminal justice system. Our country's opioid crisis is now being treated like a national health crisis, but the crack epidemic was criminalized.

Insofar as what you watched on Amazon Prime, unless they mentioned your school or colleagues specifically, I wouldn't take it so personally. The media has done an excellent job of teacher bashing over the past few years, but those of us who know our worth just do our jobs and take it in stride.

Last edited by Maceola; 02-11-2018 at 09:04 PM..
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Excellent post Maceola -
Old 02-11-2018, 07:06 PM
 
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This thread will most likely be moved to the Issues & Politics board, where it belongs.

There, you will find many people who will tell you that there is no such thing as institutionalized racism and that Blacks are responsible for their own problems. Please come over and post on that board. We desperately need your voice.
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Surly Surly is offline
 
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Maceola
Old 02-11-2018, 07:26 PM
 
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I definitely agree that poverty is the main driver of crime. It's not a melanin issue. I don't think that the view I expressed and your ideas are mutually exclusive.

I just used Blacks as an example because that's what the film suggested, that it was all a racist conspiracy and not a reaction to actual misbehavior or physical actions. I just find that notion very hard to believe.

And I don't buy the idea that we should only care about those things said explicitly about our particular school or colleagues. Media is more global and international than ever, so these absurd conspiracy theories have a greater reach than ever.


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Racism
Old 02-11-2018, 07:28 PM
 
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I have never heard of teachers delivering students to the prison system. Sounds like a crackpot conspiracy theory to me. I totally agree that without access to a great deal of money for legal representation, the poor end up in prison, no matter what race they are. However, blacks are over represented in prisons. Where is this issues and politics board? Is it under something other title?
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Old 02-11-2018, 08:15 PM
 
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You are absolutely correct. We are teachers and need to stand up for one another when the propaganda starts to spew. I follow several teacher blogs and the issue of teacher abuse is not unique to America.
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Old 02-11-2018, 08:21 PM
 
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I'm on my way. I'll start tomorrow...bedtime for me.
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Wow
Old 02-12-2018, 02:50 AM
 
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And to think some of you are actually the teachers of black children. Scary world
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Victimhood Indeed
Old 02-12-2018, 03:00 AM
 
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Victimhood is very common place these days. Many people are proud self proclaimed victims, and this has social and political power in so many ways . I am deeply concerned about future voters too. Personal responsibility is out the window now in many places. I'm surprised your comment made it through this pipeline. Victims are too concerned with their identities rather than striving for a better life. I worked for a large school district whereby suspension was mostly discouraged. The students had no consequences.The schools and district just look the other way, and teachers really pay the price. I paid it, and it cost me my career. This district enabled misbehavior by disguising passive inaction with fancy labels when addressing problems. I am luckly to have larger interests and can bounce back. Some are not so lucky. Students and parents go straight to the principal now instead of talking to the teacher for even the most minor things.


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Old 02-12-2018, 05:51 AM
 
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The disproportionate amount of AA children that get suspended in my district is a problem. The media reported one school suspended 100% AA children and no white kids. What they failed to mention was the school was basically all AA.

Again, painting teachers and admin as racists. And the district, instead of pointing that out, went on the defense.

I agree, it’s a parenting issue. Follow the Code of Conduct, stop acting like embeciles and we wouldn’t need to write you up and suspend you. Race doesn’t play into it.
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Old 02-12-2018, 10:36 AM
 
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I think highly of teachers, but like, Novice101, I had the same sentiment towards some opinions. The prison pipeline is true. Many black children can't afford to mess up routinely compared to other groups because they receive harsher punishments and are seen like adults at an earlier age. Yes, children do need a consequence for breaking a rule, and also some children's behavior could use more help from home. I was glad to read Maceola break down the black plight and how it relates to being a descendent of slaves in America. There are many things that need to be done to help resolve this problem that involves more than just parents, it's everybody.
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more than meets the eye
Old 02-12-2018, 04:06 PM
 
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We all know that there is more to this story. There are schools I know that are in the toughest part of the neighbourhoods where teachers are stellar. Even though they are in the school of hard knocks, gangs in the neighbourhood rule. It's about survival because the truth is, it's a war zone out there. So yes, depending where a school is, school-to-prison pipeline may not be so far fetch. Students that who grow up in violence are more likely to end in prison. I hate to say this but those who are lucky, are dead. I wish I'm wrong.
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:04 PM
 
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I'm sorry but there is a lot of truth in the school to prison pipeline. I do not think it is teachers fault but that doesn't mean schooling can't work to change it. Children from impoverished families come into school lower than their peers. They are therefore more likely to struggle. They are less likely to have home support (parents working two jobs, single parents, illiterate parents, parents who had bad school experiences, etc.) and that means they are less likely to have school support. When your parents fight for you in a school district you are more likely to get what you need than when they don't. Students who start out struggling are also more likely to be retained. Retention had been linked to students being more likely to drop out. Students who drop out are more likely to turn to crime because they are less likely to be able to support themselves. Female students without support at home and at school are more likely to have children early which can lead to crime (stealing to feed your kids, getting with shady men who break the law, etc.). Students who are black or hispanic are more likely to face these issues than white students. This stuff is all statistics. I find often people are unhappy when faced with a truth they aren't okay with. Do I think it's our fault as teachers? No. However, I do think we can help change it at least in some small way. For one we can fight for students whose parents won't. Fight for what your students need. Don't jump to retention. If a child struggles with behaviors try some interventions before you let yourself buy into them being a bad kid. The problem is, often struggling students have made a name for themselves by as early as 2nd grade. Teachers are warned about them before they even meet them. This further sets them up for failure.
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:43 PM
 
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It has nothing to do with black children committing more infractions and everything to do with the disproportionately severe consequences.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2012/03/0...ww.google.com/

How about this one?
https://www.washingtonpost.com/poste...=.2de9c9fe7415
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