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NewCAteacher NewCAteacher is offline
 
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OMG are you kidding?!
Old 06-28-2019, 09:05 AM
 
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I have a friend of mine who is teaching a summer school class for students with severe disabilities. Well, on Monday she had a student, who is 13-years-old, take off his diaper in class, smear his “excrement” all over the classroom, including on other students AND on her and the aides. He also tried to punch the students near him. My friend and the aides decided that it was necessary to restrain him to prevent him from causing serious injury to the other students. He wasn’t injured by the restraint. This student has many years of documented physical aggression. Punching, biting, smearing, and throwing furniture at staff and students. When the SPED director was notified of the incident, SPED director was furious that they restrained him. She didn’t seem to care at all that there were feces all over the classroom including on the students (HUGE health hazard) and he was trying to injure other kids. He is a very large boy. She only seemed to care about the fact that they restrained him. He was not injured by the restraint, as my friend and her aides have been trained in how to do this professionally. My friend and her aides ended up with feces on their clothing, hair, and skin from this restraint because he was so hard to de-escalate. Just another example of everything being “the teacher’s fault.”


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Old 06-28-2019, 09:15 AM
 
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Just the thought of it They don’t pay her enough for that. What an assh...............! that supervisor is How would she like it if it happened to her
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Old 06-28-2019, 09:27 AM
 
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I agree with elepen. The supervisor is only looking out for district liability. I'd get the parents of that child to sue the district due to the lack of appropriate services . Befriend that parent and teach her/him their child's rights. As soon as the parent understands that the teacher cares about their kid,that parent can be a big help for that teacher.
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Old 06-28-2019, 11:00 AM
 
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Horrible. The alternative to restraint would likely be to remove other people from the room and call a crisis team.

I hope your friend talks directly with the director to clarify the steps to take in this type of situation. If the teacher is not in agreement, talk with union and/or resign.

And no one uses the room until it is cleaned and sanitized. Any personal items destroyed should be replaced by district. District also pays any medical bills.
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Over the yrs, I have dealt with some
Old 06-28-2019, 12:42 PM
 
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violent kids and ones who do gross stuff, but never anything that gross. Schools are now often more concerned about the rights of 1 above the others. That philosophy has almost destroyed the school I have been at for many yrs.
Blaming the teacher has always been around, but it is extremely disgusting in this case.
It is too bad the other kids who got "smeared" did not have their parents threaten to sue. A plan to deal with it would be put in place quickly if they did.
The teachers have my deepest sympathies.


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Old 06-28-2019, 01:30 PM
 
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I am sorry to say this but I wouldn't have been allowed to restrain in this instance either. They make it very clear to us though that if we use restraint for any reason other than to prevent severe bodily injury to another student (its even frowned upon if the threat is to a teacher because teachers should be "on the look out" and leave the environment to ensure their safety rather than restrain) its not allowed.

If the issue was just property destruction by contamination of feces (or any property destruction really, we had a student break a window and another student threw the projector at the wall and we had to just stand back. We have to allow them to destroy property. and continue hands off deescalation. If the issue is just a health violation like throwing feces we are told to evacuate the students and staff.

Not sure if you saw my post about the class action lawsuit about restraint I posted in teacher news, but even those trained who dont injure a student are being sued over this-I am sure your district is aware of this as this has gotten a lot of media coverage. It makes district even more jumpy when class actions are in the air. It would take a whole lot before I ever used my restraint training.

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Any personal items destroyed should be replaced by district.
Absolutely! I verified this with my union rep-teachers have the right to have destroyed items replaced and ed code provides for schools to charge student for destroyed materials. while the law allows for any one to hold another person financial responsible for destroy property. Sped or not if items are destroyed your friend and her aides have a legal right to be compensations for them.

Last edited by Kinderkr4zy; 06-28-2019 at 02:06 PM..
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Old 06-28-2019, 01:45 PM
 
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When I taught SPED I had a kid strip down, destroy my room and then urinate in the room. We evacuated the room and the para and I watched him do it and documented. Since he wasn’t a danger to himself or others we didn’t restrain.

I did give my principal a hefty bill for everything that needed to be replaced (and she did, any other P would have fought it and it would have been a grievance).

I hate to say it, but they probably shouldn’t have restrained. They probably would have been better off evacuating the other kids and letting him go to town, documenting the whole thing. The director handled it horribly. I think your friend should invite her in to observe. It sounds like she’s been out of the classroom too long.
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Old 06-28-2019, 01:56 PM
 
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I was going to comment what Greyhound and Kinder already said... but, in my district we also would not have been permitted to restrain him.

We would have cleared the other students out of the room and called the crisis team.

Restraining is only allowed to be used, in my district/state, is the child is causing immediate danger to their self or others. As our first action is always to clean the room, no other students would be in immediate danger. Property destruction is not considered danger.
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Punching
Old 06-28-2019, 02:51 PM
 
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They restrained mostly due to the fact that he was trying to punch other students, from what I understand
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Old 06-28-2019, 03:21 PM
 
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I get why they felt like they needed to restrain, I had to do it this year when a kiddo was preventing others from leaving the room. And room clears are a giant pain in the butt. One way to look at it, though - it's hard data that can't be ignored by admin. Having to do a room clear for one kid five times a day? That is clear data that the student doesn't have the right supports in the current placement, and that it's significantly impacting the learning time of everyone else. Plus, room clears are a lot less paperwork than restraints.


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Old 06-28-2019, 04:07 PM
 
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Quote:
They restrained mostly due to the fact that he was trying to punch other students, from what I understand
Just an FYI I wouldnt be allowed to restrain over punching either- its not considered "serious injury". I have been instructed to step between and evacuate and this was one of the few times we can put hands on child to pull them out of harms way-but we still are told not to restrain.

One of my aides got punched in the face today and student went after other kids-The student was not restrained. The aide and others were evacuated and I was told to be the one to work with him from here on out.

I am not saying its right but restraint is literally a last resort around here-some of that is due to new laws about restraint that came into effect just a few months ago.

Quote:
The new law says that a pupil “has the right to be free from the use of seclusion and behavioral restraints of any form imposed as a means of coercion, discipline, convenience, or retaliation by staff” (Education Code Section 49005.2). Seclusion or a behavioral restraint may be used “only to control behavior that poses a clear and present danger of serious physical harm to the pupil or others that cannot be immediately prevented by a response that is less restrictive” (Education Code Section 49005.4).
Serious threat-as we have been instructed does include biting and forceful striking with a large, heavy or otherwise danger object.

BUT to be clear one of my students punches others whenever anyone smaller than him is within arms reach-we have to keep others out of his arms reach. He also punches himself so hard he bruises-several of my kids do. If we restrained him every time he tries to punch other students we would be restraining him daily-multiple time on a bad day. This student is 120 pounds also so I'm not talking about a tiny child whose punches dont hurt-they hurt and bruise.

I get where you friend was coming from, but I would suggest getting more support from the district behaviors, the crisis team ect. Restraint-even when done correctly can cause harm to the student so it should be avoided if at all possible (I swear I just paraphrased CPI training unintentionally ).

It sounds like admin needs to be communicating what is and isn't considered "imminent threat of serious bodily injury". If this is left up to interpretation of course people arent going o be sure when to use and when not to. Admin needs to do their job and have a policy in place and communicate that policy. Admin is probably just upset that they have to report this and possibly hold a new IEP meet to discuss the need to increase supports or determine if the BIP was followed-the new law requires this when "Emergency Interventions" are used.

https://www.cde.ca.gov/nr/el/le/yr18ltr1224.asp
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Old 06-28-2019, 04:49 PM
 
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I'm in shock. There is no way it is OK for a kid to do that, and yet we're supposed to just stand around and let them?? That's ridiculous.

What logic says that the "rights" of one child are more important than the safety of all the others?
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Old 06-28-2019, 05:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Serious threat-as we have been instructed does include biting and forceful striking with a large, heavy or otherwise danger object.
I wonder what the person who decided this policy would say if his child were struck with a large, heavy, danger object because the adults in the room couldn't restrain the perpetrator.
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Yep
Old 06-28-2019, 05:14 PM
 
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Thank you everyone for understanding where my friend was coming from. She was so upset by the whole situation, with the child not really having his needs met in this setting, the serious health hazard, and with other students getting feces on them and being put in a dangerous situation. I didn’t know there was paperwork involved when a restraint is done...what a PITA..but restraint is such an invasive response...so the paperwork part makes sense. You have to justify that the situation was dangerous enough to warrant that. I only witnessed a restraint one time, and it was in a class for kids with severe disabilities, and apparently his IEP team decided it was necessary for him. That was about 6 years ago.
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Old 06-29-2019, 09:58 AM
 
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When did the violent student become more important than all the others? A student could possibly become injured during restraint, but how is it better to allow that student to injure multiple other students? Real life isn't like that. If a man in a stadium begins punching everyone around him, security isn't going to evacuate the stadium. Security is going to restrain the man and get him out of there.
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Old 06-29-2019, 01:35 PM
 
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"One way to look at it, though - it's hard data that can't be ignored by admin. Having to do a room clear for one kid five times a day? That is clear data that the student doesn't have the right supports in the current placement, and that it's significantly impacting the learning time of everyone else. Plus, room clears are a lot less paperwork than restraints."

I wish. In my last school, teachers are not allowed to restrain but are reprimanded for either calling for help using the established system or for evacuating the room. So when a child is flipping desks, throwing chairs, and full-body-tackling other kids to punch and claw at their faces, we were supposed to.....keep teaching math, I guess. The student being pummeled could probably still hear most of the lesson? Teachers were written up in their evaluations for evacuating or calling for help, even if they were following the behavior/safety plan that admin had put in place for the child, which included those exact steps.
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Best practices in behavior
Old 06-29-2019, 05:03 PM
 
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Any teacher who has been trained in behavior management skills has been told "Tell a student what to DO, don't tell them what NOT to do." Teachers are being thrown under the bus by school and district administrators who are telling teachers what NOT to do without telling the teachers what to do.

If teachers emailed school and district administrators asking specifically how they should handle various situations - a student throwing feces at other students, a student banging his head against the floor (you are not supposed to touch a student who is on the floor), a student urinating on an electrical plug - it MIGHT force administrators to respond realistically, and MIGHT protect teachers who receive no response to direct requests for guidance.

Here is where all teachers need to work together, regardless of union membership. If the majority of teachers dealing with problem behaviors requested specific directions from all level of administrators, that MIGHT provide some pressure. Parents could also ask the administrators how they are directing teachers to protect the physical safety and learning time of other students in the room.
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Old 06-30-2019, 11:12 AM
 
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Quote:
I wonder what the person who decided this policy would say if his child were struck with a large, heavy, danger object because the adults in the room couldn't restrain the perpetrator.
It would be the teacher's fault, of course.
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Old 06-30-2019, 06:39 PM
 
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Wow. Wow. Wow. Hugs to your friend and her aides. Don’t send me to hell for this, but sped teachers shouldn’t have to endure this. Isn’t there such thing as “workplace safety”??
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SPED field is a mess
Old 07-13-2019, 08:34 AM
 
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This is the BIG problem with SPED.

No one is allowed to protect themselves or other students for fear of liability.

I'm not saying "fight back" against a student going crazy, I'm just saying I'm not going to stand there and let them wipe fecal matter on me.

Oh hell no!
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Agreed
Old 07-13-2019, 02:13 PM
 
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What makes it 10x worse is then being told it is your fault. So not only are you supposed to accept being assaulted and not mind it, you are also supposed to believe it is your fault. Pathetic.
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Old 07-14-2019, 07:01 AM
 
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Exactly.

It's the only profession I can think of where you're penalized for trying to avoid being physically assaulted.
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