HELP! Breaking contract before school starts... - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      The VENT

HELP! Breaking contract before school starts...

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
elementaryme
 
 
Guest

elementaryme
 
 
Guest
HELP! Breaking contract before school starts...
Old 07-17-2019, 11:21 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

So here's my dilemma...

I graduated last summer (2018) and wasn't able to find a permanent teaching job for the fall, so I ended up doing some long term subbing at the school in which I did my teacher assisting/student teaching. This school is my DREAM job. It's close to where I live, I love the people that work there, and it's a Title I public school. However, when this school year ended, no positions were available. So, I started applying.

Fast forward a few months, I was offered a job at a charter school 30 minutes north of where I live. The staff and administration is amazing, but it's pretty far away and I'm not totally jazzed about it being a charter school. That is not where I ever pictured working. Plus, my classroom is pretty tiny (I could make it work, but still). But because I didn't have any other options, I accepted the position.

Now it's mid-July right now, we have about a month until school starts. I got a call from one of the teachers at the public school who I did some long term subbing for. It turns out, she resigned from her position to move to a different district. Her position is available and she suggested I email the principal to see if they would want to hire me.

Now, here's the dilemma. I would LOVE that job. Like, it's truly my dream job. But I already accepted the position at the other school, I've sent out a Meet the Teacher letter, I've gone to some professional development with them, I signed my name in books that were sent out to my class, etc. Plus, when they hired me they said something along the lines of, "If we offer you the position, does this mean you'll stop looking for other jobs?" I did stop looking for jobs and at the time, I truly didn't have any other options available. This kind of just fell into my lap.

Now, I have no idea if I will even be offered the job at the public school, as I haven't heard back from the principal yet, but I am just so torn on what to do. I would feel so awful leaving this charter school that I've been so graciously welcomed into, but at the same time, I don't know if or when another job at this public school would become available and that is really where I want to end up. I need advice. Please, if you were in this situation, how would you handle it? Stay at the charter school out of guilt and loyalty, or go to the public school of your dreams and leave the other school scrambling?


  Reply With Quote

Summerwillcom Summerwillcom is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,758
Senior Member

Summerwillcom
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,758
Senior Member
Go with your dream school if they offer it.
Old 07-17-2019, 04:51 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I'd feel guilty too...just because of the way I am. However, if you do not know when another job is going to be offered there and you get offered it, I'd say snatch it up and stay. You do not know if you'd even like the charter school.
I was in a similar situation a long time ago. I was offered a job at my dream school, but I had just signed on in a different school a few months before. ( There was more to my situation and I had stronger feelings of loyalty to the contract/ people.)
IDK if any schools have loyalty like they used to nowadays. Do check into if it can be done though in your state. Sometimes, you can get a P to release you if the other P talks him into it. ( I had that happen 1x.)
Make sure you can do it too w/out your license getting yanked for a yr.
Good luck and go with your gut!
Summerwillcom is offline   Reply With Quote
MrsPhysics MrsPhysics is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 97
Full Member

MrsPhysics
 
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 97
Full Member
Look out for yourself first
Old 07-17-2019, 04:57 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I know that it will make you feel really bad, but you have to do whatever is in your own best interest. I have been in a similar (but probably a little easier) situation two times, having accepted LTS jobs and then resigning them later in the summer because something better came along. Both times, the schools from which I resigned were very understanding. The charter school will probably not be quite as gracious since they may have trouble finding another good candidate. This is usually the fault of the school. If they paid and treated teachers like the public schools do, they wouldn’t have the problems retaining good people. (At least, that’s how it is here.)

The sad truth is, there are not many schools that show loyalty toward their employees, and they don’t deserve our loyalty back.
MrsPhysics is offline   Reply With Quote
klarabelle's Avatar
klarabelle klarabelle is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 18,139
Senior Member

klarabelle
 
klarabelle's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 18,139
Senior Member

Old 07-17-2019, 05:02 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I would wait to see if a position is offered to you. Then I would leave the charter. You have to look out for yourself and your needs.
klarabelle is offline   Reply With Quote
elementaryme
 
 
Guest

elementaryme
 
 
Guest

Old 07-17-2019, 05:21 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

Thanks for the responses, everyone! I have no clue how I would even go about telling the charter school since they have been SO nice and excited to have me... but IF they offer me the position (which I don't even know if they will) I would love to take it.

They haven't even replied to my inquiry email but I'm already so stressed out about it lol


  Reply With Quote
overthesun overthesun is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2019
Posts: 7
New Member

overthesun
 
Joined: Jul 2019
Posts: 7
New Member

Old 07-17-2019, 05:21 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

I am in pretty mush the same exact position. I have come to the conclusion yes you will feel bad but you have to look out for yourself because no one else will. If it is your dream district go for it!
overthesun is offline   Reply With Quote
overthesun overthesun is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2019
Posts: 7
New Member

overthesun
 
Joined: Jul 2019
Posts: 7
New Member

Old 07-17-2019, 05:23 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Oh also most charter schools are “at will” so it’s not technically a contract from what I have been told.
overthesun is offline   Reply With Quote
elementaryme
 
 
Guest

elementaryme
 
 
Guest

Old 07-17-2019, 05:26 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

Another thing I should mention is that, at this charter school, I'm technically not under contract. It's an "at will" school, or that's how they explained it to me when I was hired. I'm not sure how that plays into this situation, because I've already started to do so much with the staff and for my class, but I feel like it is important to note.

What it sounds like to me is that they could technically "fire" you at the end of the school year (or really any time) if you aren't living up to their expectations or standards, but that's in extreme cases.
  Reply With Quote
kahluablast's Avatar
kahluablast kahluablast is online now
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 18,998
Senior Member

kahluablast
 
kahluablast's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 18,998
Senior Member

Old 07-17-2019, 05:40 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

Little story: (maybe not little?)

I live less than 2 miles from my dream school. Worked there for 5 years and the next year there wasn't a position, and I was cut. Took a job 30 minutes away, but at the 20 day count a job opened at my "old" dream school and I took it. Who wants to drive 30 minutes when they can walk to school? The next year I ended up in the same position. Took a job 30 minutes away (large district - everything is 30 minutes away). The principal made me promise that I would stick out the year even if something came along in my "old" dream school. I agreed and intended to keep that promise.

However, at the 20 day count the principal came to me and said that they had lost a position, so she was going to have to cut me. Ummm, it doesn't work both ways? Anyway, in my district it doesn't matter how long you have been at a site, it matters how long you have worked for the district, and I was not low man on the totem pole, and I wasn't low man on the totem pole. I pulled that card and she couldn't let me go. Sorry other person. Been there, done that. Anyway, when a position opened up at my "old" dream school at Christmas time, I jumped. I wouldn't have if the P hadn't pulled that little stunt earlier in the year, but that made me realize who you owe allegiance to, and it isn't the job. You owe yourself to do whatever is best for you.

If you get interviewed and they offer you the job, then take it if you feel it is better for you. You only owe yourself the best you can do for you.
kahluablast is online now   Reply With Quote
UVAgrl928 UVAgrl928 is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 934
Senior Member

UVAgrl928
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 934
Senior Member

Old 07-17-2019, 05:43 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

Definitely check if you even can- this can't happen where I am.


UVAgrl928 is offline   Reply With Quote
letsgomets's Avatar
letsgomets letsgomets is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,226
Senior Member

letsgomets
 
letsgomets's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,226
Senior Member
Make sure
Old 07-17-2019, 05:51 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

that you can get out of the contract without a penalty. Around here, charter school teachers have to follow the rules of the county and have a similar contract.

Some districts will threaten to (and can) pull your teaching license if you resign that way.

Good luck!!
ETA:

Quote:
Another thing I should mention is that, at this charter school, I'm technically not under contract. It's an "at will" school, or that's how they explained it to me when I was hired. I'm not sure how that plays into this situation, because I've already started to do so much with the staff and for my class, but I feel like it is important to note.
Sorry, I missed that part. I'm reading too fast. Still, good luck!

Last edited by letsgomets; 07-18-2019 at 05:50 AM.. Reason: Added something.
letsgomets is offline   Reply With Quote
Kinderkr4zy's Avatar
Kinderkr4zy Kinderkr4zy is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,480
Senior Member

Kinderkr4zy
 
Kinderkr4zy's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,480
Senior Member

Old 07-17-2019, 08:19 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

BEEN THERE-I accepted a job at a charter becuase...it was the only offer I had and something beats nothing. I was later offered positions that were more what I was looking for but I felt like I couldnt skip out after accepting, doing PD, doing a meet our new staff night and meeting parents, having my name and bio put up on the website ect.

Well, it turned out that the charter school was not what it seemed. It was dumpster fire-and many other people who initially accepted had moved on to greener pastured by the tie school started.

I started interviewing elsewhere by January-I was truly miserable-and I was choosier the second time through and found a good fit school. I was lucky that I had other offers to be choosy with. Those other teachers who kept looking and found better schools were the smart ones-they didnt have to endure the horrible year that I had.

I was also "at will" and when they heard I was leaving at the end of the year they fired me-they had no problems dropping me the minute they "were mad" at me for not staying on-I never owed them a shred of loyalty.

Also-its just interviewing-dont worry over a moral quandary until you have a job OFFER.
Kinderkr4zy is offline   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 6,640
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 6,640
Senior Member

Old 07-17-2019, 08:33 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

I would definitely go interview at the public school if offered. No need to panic about this until you know you have a job offer from them. If you get an offer, then you can really think about pros/cons. Since the charter is at will, you can leave at any time. I would not feel guilty. As the pp said, they will not show the same loyalty to you- everyone is replaceable. I know there is are a couple of posters here that work in charter schools and enjoy them, but absolutely everything I hear IRL is awful. I don't know a single teacher who has had a positive experience (and I probably know 20+ who have worked in charters), and charters are generally pretty well respected in my area. If I had a chance at a public school, I'd jump at it.
Haley23 is offline   Reply With Quote
PrimaryTeach8 PrimaryTeach8 is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 8
New Member

PrimaryTeach8
 
Joined: Jun 2019
Posts: 8
New Member

Old 07-17-2019, 10:32 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

This is what confuses me. If we can lose our license for breaking a teacher contract, then why are there so many teachers who quit mid-year? They wouldn’t risk losing their license if that happened.
PrimaryTeach8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Tessa_Rue's Avatar
Tessa_Rue Tessa_Rue is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 979
Senior Member

Tessa_Rue
 
Tessa_Rue's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 979
Senior Member
Best alternative
Old 07-18-2019, 02:46 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

Quote:
PrimaryTeach8's Message:

This is what confuses me. If we can lose our license for breaking a teacher contract, then why are there so many teachers who quit mid-year? They wouldn’t risk losing their license if that happened.
Well, as someone who has quit mid-year, it was the best option for me regardless of the potential consequences of having my license suspended.

Also, it’s generally a year suspension of the teaching license when it happens, not forever.

Finally, districts generally wouldn’t go after someone who quit bc they are relocating bc of a spouse’s job, sick family, that type of thing.
Tessa_Rue is offline   Reply With Quote
geoteacher8 geoteacher8 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2018
Posts: 53
Junior Member

geoteacher8
 
Joined: Sep 2018
Posts: 53
Junior Member
Public trumps charter
Old 07-18-2019, 04:29 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

almost every time. You need to look out for yourself, your future retirement, your benefits, your job security.
geoteacher8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Teacherbee_4 Teacherbee_4 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 6,762
Senior Member

Teacherbee_4
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 6,762
Senior Member
Additionally
Old 07-18-2019, 06:40 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

Quote:
Quote:
PrimaryTeach8's Message:

This is what confuses me. If we can lose our license for breaking a teacher contract, then why are there so many teachers who quit mid-year? They wouldn’t risk losing their license if that happened.

Well, as someone who has quit mid-year, it was the best option for me regardless of the potential consequences of having my license suspended.

Also, it’s generally a year suspension of the teaching license when it happens, not forever.

Finally, districts generally wouldn’t go after someone who quit bc they are relocating bc of a spouse’s job, sick family, that type of thing.
Additionally, I don't believe all states do this. I know my state doesn't do this; however, virtually every district has a pretty high fine for breaking a contract.
Teacherbee_4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Tori58 Tori58 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 550
Senior Member

Tori58
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 550
Senior Member

Old 07-18-2019, 06:56 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

Quote:
What it sounds like to me is that they could technically "fire" you at the end of the school year (or really any time) if you aren't living up to their expectations or standards, but that's in extreme cases.
That's exactly what it means and their definition of "extreme cases" might be different than yours. As others have said, research your state laws about it. In this state, if you haven't signed a contract, there would be no consequences. The cost for breaking a contract is determined by the district and has no effect on your license. (In this state, your license can only be revoked for proven incompetent or immoral conduct, a felony conviction, delinquent taxes or child-support.)

Don't let any misguided sense of loyalty or fair play keep you from a better job.
Tori58 is offline   Reply With Quote
applesaucencr applesaucencr is offline
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 78
Junior Member

applesaucencr
 
Joined: May 2017
Posts: 78
Junior Member

Old 07-18-2019, 07:46 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

Definitely go if you are offered an interview. The pay will probably be higher and it sounds like a better fit. Employers put themselves first and so should you.

I am so glad that I live in place where your license cannot be taken away due to quitting. What a ridiculous practice!
applesaucencr is offline   Reply With Quote
elementaryme elementaryme is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2019
Posts: 1
New Member

elementaryme
 
Joined: Jul 2019
Posts: 1
New Member
even more confused...
Old 07-18-2019, 07:46 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

I know I haven't even been OFFERED the job OR an interview at the public school, but the whole thing is just making me so anxious. I talked to my mom about it and she thinks I should stay at the charter school simply because they have been so nice to me. And they have! I mean, all of the teachers added me on Facebook, one of them gave me money for books for my classroom library, the principal and support staff are super supportive, we're even going on a "bonding" trip in a few weeks. As far as this charter school, I think it's one of those rare ones where it's actually legitimately GOOD. The staff and administration are great, all of the teachers CHOOSE to be there.

At the public school, while I love the teachers I would work with, the principal is not so great. Not bad, but not overly amazing either. But I'm sure the benefits and pay outweigh the charter by a lot. So, for my first year of teaching, I'm thinking it might be beneficial to stay at the charter to have a really supportive staff.

I so appreciate everyone's outlook on this situation. I'm feeling so anxious, but as my dad keeps reminding me, I shouldn't worry about it until I have an interview. Otherwise, it's a moot point. Easier said than done!
elementaryme is offline   Reply With Quote
Renea's Avatar
Renea Renea is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 11,754
Senior Member

Renea
 
Renea's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 11,754
Senior Member

Old 07-18-2019, 08:08 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

All teachers need to know they don't work for a school district or a charter school. They work for themselves! Every move teachers make in their professional career needs to be for their own personal benefit.

If you talk to retired teachers many will tell you that hindsight has told them it would have been best if they made career decisions that focused on their own benefit and not the district's best interest.

If you're offered a better job at a better district, take it. Never choose a career path based out of guilt or loyalty. Your priority is what's best for you.
Renea is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
The VENT
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:05 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net