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tricks for helping learn letters of the alphabet

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calumetteach calumetteach is offline
 
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tricks for helping learn letters of the alphabet
Old 10-24-2018, 01:09 PM
 
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I know it takes time. I know that my growing students may have learning issues. I have one student who knew zero letters, now he knows about 4. We are faithfully doing a tracing alphabet with him and having him write/construct his name with magnetic letters, name puzzles etc...which he does well!

But knowing/recognizing the words not so much...I have about 4 or 5 that struggle. Is there more that I can do. I wish I had tactile letters but I don't. I do have a book they practice every day.

Thanks for any help you can give me and my little ones.


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Old 10-24-2018, 01:22 PM
 
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Not what you are looking for but can you write a donor choose grant to get you the tactile letters and other things that will help your students?
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Old 10-24-2018, 01:55 PM
 
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If you have a die cut thing at school, you can cut the letters from fine grit sand paper.
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Tactile alphabet
Old 10-24-2018, 02:49 PM
 
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Trace the letters with white glue onto paper plates.
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so do you find the tactile aspect
Old 10-24-2018, 03:15 PM
 
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really works? How many letters would you do at a time and is there any specific order? I tend to overthink so maybe I'm making it more difficult than it needs to be.


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Jolly Phonics
Old 10-24-2018, 04:00 PM
 
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Is there a classroom in your building (4K or K) that has a Jolly Phonics program? This is what I use in my intervention program for teaching the letters and their sounds.

I teach one letter per day. With my more challenged students, we may spend more than one day per letter.

The Jolly Phonics program has a song for each letter. Within the song is also the sound of the letter.

Example: The snake is in the grass, the snake is in the grass, s-s-s-s, the snake is in the grass. (for the letter s)

I also use flashcards that I made. Each flashcard has the upper and lower case letter, a picture with the beginning sound of the letter, and the sound of the letter. (S,s, a picture of the sun, sssss) Students take the flashcards home each night to practice with parents.

My students also practice writing the upper and lower case letter on another student's back, the large whiteboard, small whiteboards, paper/pencil, etc. Part of their homework is to write the letter six places...someone's back, the refrigerator, a window, a door, etc.

I also have sand in small pans where they practice writing the letter of the day.
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ABCs
Old 10-24-2018, 06:21 PM
 
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First of all, are you sure they don't know them? What I mean is have you tried "Point to the C." while showing them a handful of letters? I have had students who couldn't/wouldn't name the letter but could point to it in a line up. Then I would say "Good Job! This is a C. What letter is it?" I would have them repeat it after me. Then I might try 1-2 more. Then I would mix all of those ones together and see if they could name them. I would do this everyday adding a letter every other day or so depending on success. Whether covering sounds or names I never cover more than 3-4 at a time. Honestly, I think it's better to focus on sounds before letter names. Often letter names are confusing and they aren't needed as much as sounds. What grade/ability level are these students? Far as easy tactile goes I think you could do something like tracing in a sand tray. Or just working with foam letters. The dollar store here regularly sells foam alphabet puzzles. These puzzles are usually bumpy on the front side.
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Old 10-24-2018, 07:02 PM
 
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If tactile is helpful for this student, could you cut letters out of sandpaper? (Maybe a parent volunteer would take on this project.)
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Old 10-24-2018, 08:03 PM
 
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In addition to the above suggestions, the Letter Factory from Leap Frog is fantastic. I'm not an advocate of videos, but I swear that thing is magic. My own kids all knew their letters and sounds at age 3 just because of that darn video, and my current students enjoy it as well.


Games also make it fun - bingo, memory, go fish, kaboom (or bam or whatever you want to call it), etc. Write letters in chalk on the blacktop and let them run and jump on them. Have them write letters in sand, with chalk, paint (or water and paintbrushes outside), white boards, make them with playdough, whatever they find fun and engaging.


I have one that's in her second year of kinder. Finally - after 220 days of school - she knows her letters and sounds. Our team is going out for a drink in her honor.
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Old 10-25-2018, 04:20 AM
 
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You are going to get a variety of answers because every child is different. That being said ,after many years of teaching these skills this is what worked for the many chdren that learned how to read with me: a routine that was very very systematic and I do it every single day. I use the currently required alphabet pictures and introduce one letter per day. The drill sounds like this: A Andy Apple. a,a,a. You name the letter,name the picture, produce the sound three times Students repeat it. Each day brings a new letter and review of previous letters.

Adding to this routine is the writing of the letter and a guided writing lesson of a sentence. Of course I read a story to the students each day as well. It is day 43 now. We are reviewing tough guy letters..those letters that do not make the sound when you name of the letter. We are writing two letter words from oral dictation.

I found that the rythmic nature of naming the letter, naming the picture and producing the sound three times works for most of my students every year. We add a hand or foot motion too . It seems like a lot for every letter but talking,moving and writing is what gets my students learning the sounds.

We have many hands on things in the classroom for sound learning but the explicit quickly paced rythmic pattern of reviewing the letters is successful for my students. I do not show a picture now with the alphabet cards, just the letter and currently only have four students who need to practice with me.



Last edited by anna; 10-25-2018 at 06:23 AM..
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The measured mom
Old 10-26-2018, 02:08 AM
 
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The measured mom is a website that has a ton of FREE resources you might find useful. The only requirement is that you need to sign up for her newsletter. From Playdough to Plato is another great resource with even more FREEBIES. ( I just love the name of her website!)

Another fantastic FREE resource is from Henry County. Google "RTI MENU,
Henry County." The first unit is letter recognition, followed by letter sounds. Step by step lesson plans, assessments, progress monitoring, as well as all materials needed are included. I have used their sight word unit and it's very easy to follow. It's a great resource for assistants or volunteers if you are lucky enough to have them. The pdf has 453 pages. Did I mention it's FREE?!?!
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