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praterteaches praterteaches is offline
 
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Old 04-17-2020, 05:16 PM
 
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Hello fellow Kindergarten teachers,

I would like to find out what different teachers are doing online during the shut down. I have a parent insisting that we are not doing enough. She wants an academic lesson for her child everyday.

I work at a private school and I do a bible lesson 2x a week online and my aid does another lesson 2x a week online for 2 TKers.

Also, we are texting, sending work, checking in with parents to see if they need anything, etc.

What are other Kindergarten teachers doing during the week with their students? -Mary


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Old 04-18-2020, 07:36 AM
 
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My district has done paper packets. I haven't put out much else as I don't want the parents to be overwhelmed, I don't think the kids should have boatloads of work to do, and I don't want to bust my tail for things that aren't going to get done.


I have done some Zoom meetings with my kids to let them interact with each other and me (make sure you set the settings securely if you do this). I've done a video of me reading a book, and will probably do a few more of some mini-lessons or something like that. I've also shared online resources with the parents. Raz Kids is currently free through the end of the year (you can set up a teacher account and add all your kids, so you can track their progress) which offers virtual books for the kids to read. It'll even let them record their voice reading, and it's so sweet to hear them reading. I only have a handful of kids who've actually logged on though (which makes me glad I'm not doing a ton more).



Perhaps for the parent who wants more you could share some of the online resources? There are lots of companies offering free access during this time. Journaling is another great activity to suggest.
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Kinder distant learning
Old 04-18-2020, 08:58 AM
 
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Don't worry about what ALL of your parents are thinking, feeling, or experiencing right now. Most feel that they aren't in control of their lives so that will carry through to what they want to accomplish. What seemed to calm and help parents in my class was giving them a schedule that reflected what our state recommends that the students participate in for early elementary years .
(positive feedback). Our state recommends 2 - 2 1/2 hours per day of direct learning. What I initially sent them was MY schedule with deep modifications. That too was a bit daunting for them. I will post a copy of my 2 hour schedule once I convert it . I am unable to post as is. It has been EMPHASIZED that the schedule is to be highly flexible and tweaked to their comfort zone.
Our state recommends review of concepts and skills only and no new concepts be taught.

I use class dojo to communicate, post files (pictures) ,and post events classroom. learning platform. I do not use google classroom, google meet, (district recommended) or any other platform yet. . .I am trying to intro zoom this week and would like to have 2-3 reading lessons per week using the big books and other reading tools at home I have at home. . (wishful thinking)???
I will not meet individually with anyone.

My students are highly encouraged by the district to use the iready program but the participation has been very spotty at best. With this new schedule I am seeing improvements. I just began posting assigned read-a-louds on Epic website and I am hopeful this will be utilized by more than 6 students.

I had to bite the bullet and purchase a few totally interactive practice lessons from TPT and they have been highly favorable. As a previous reading intervention teacher I have a plethora of files which are way to large to post for my parents .

The problems we are facing are regarding Chromebooks that were passed out 2 weeks ago from the district. Some are completely inoperable, missing chargers, and can't seem to load programs. I'm glad I handed out hard copies for my students last month at the grab and go lunch line!
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schedule
Old 04-18-2020, 09:38 AM
 
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Here is my schedule. . .just a mere guide. I don't think I can send an editable version. . . If you want an editable one you might need to send me a personal message.

PS. I have one parent who wants a daily assignment posted on google classroom because her children are staying with grandma.
Lololol Her son finally learned his sounds and only has 12 sight words under his belt. He struggles to write a sentence with direction. He has ADHD. I sent her interactive files and she was pleased.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Editable Kindergarten Schedule .pdf (223.3 KB, 55 views)
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Old 04-18-2020, 09:54 AM
 
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We sent our student iPads home. We only found out a few hours before dismissal that the iPads would go home and we had to put together some information packets (not worksheets), the students consumable math books, journals...Initially we were given a 4 hour daily schedule that we had to follow. Yikes! (After discussion with admin and parent feedback, we have some flexibility in that. They understand that some parents are still working, some kids are being taken care of by babysitters or grandparents,...) We try to make it follow their normal school day as far as subjects, but it is abbreviated. Originally, it was review only, but after the first two weeks, it is new learning and review.

We are using the Seesaw app, Epic app, iReady app and Google Meet app. We have parents use Go Noodle, assign videos from YouTube (yoga, dance and songs) for brain breaks and encourage playing and getting exercise outside if possible.

I post my "Home Learning Plan" with the activities on Seesaw each morning.
Here is a general plan I follow each day:
  • Morning Message-They read the message with their grown-up. Then, depending on the day, they underline the sight words; put a dot under each word/count the words; look for and circle the mistakes; ... There is always a question in the morning message. The last thing they do is record themselves answering the question.

Reading/Whole Group:
  • Read Aloud/Lesson-I use posters/passages, big books from our reading program (Benchmark Literacy) and books online. I do video/slides to make lessons/model a strategy.There is a read aloud every day. I don't do a lesson every day. On the days I don't, the students are practicing the strategy. i.e. Right now we are working on predicting. Thursday I did a lesson. Yesterday they practiced. I used the book, The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog. I had them stop at a certain picture and share their prediction. When they finished the book, they recorded their prediction and the clues they used. Then I shared my prediction and clues I used. Yesterday we "discovered" that even though we used the clues and made good predictions, the author had a surprise ending.

Reading/Small Group:
We can assign a decodable book, have them read a passage/answer questions (leveled passages) on Seesaw, or can assign a book on Benchmark.Now that the closing keeps being extended, we are looking into RAZKids.

For Daily 5:
  • Read to Self/Listen to Reading-3 days/week they use Epic app or read books from home 10-15 minutes and 2 days/week they read a decodable book we share in a Seesaw activity (to build fluency).

  • Sight Word Practice-I introduce words in a Seesaw activity on one day. Then I made a separate Seesaw activity for each word with a song video and practice activities for that word that they do the following days.(one Seesaw activity/day)
  • Phonics/Phonemic Awareness-I assign a Seesaw activity that I create such as word building, reading c-v-c words, word sorts, syllable counts, rhyming words... based on what we are working on. Last week we introduced th digraph so the Seesaw activity was the video lesson that day. They learned how to mark the th digraph and practiced in Seesaw activities on other days. Once a week, I started doing a Seesaw activity where I say the words and students write and mark the words.
  • Work on Writing-I assign a Seesaw activity like Write the Room, write the c-v-c word for each picture, trace and rainbow write the words... I don't assign an activity every day because we do writer's workshop, too.)

Writer's Workshop:
  • Writing-We were working on opinion writing when school closure started. I model lessons in a Seesaw activity and students write in their journals. They take photo of their writing to post on Seesaw for me to review/give feedback every day. Some days we do opinion writing. Other days we do narrative writing. Every now and then, we do a directed drawing activity. We are getting ready to start informative writing.

Math:
  • Math-I do lesson video/slides in a Seesaw activity where I model with manipulatives and students follow along with manipulatives. (At the beginning of the year I sent home a zippered pouch with items they need to play games I have them do for homework like two-color counters, connecting cubes, ten frames, dice... so my students have manipulatives at home to use.) I include screenshots the first two pages of the math book lesson and I do those pages with them. (I talk them through it, point out things I remember students having difficulty with in the past... in a video.) Then students complete the other two math pages independently. Parents give the directions. They take a photo of the page I request to post on Seesaw for me to review and give feedback. There is usually a second Seesaw activity to review something-counting to 100, addition facts... That might be a song video, sorting activity, flashcard drill...

Originally, admin wanted students to do a half hour every day on iReady for reading and a half hour every day on iReady for math. (We don't even do that when we are in school.) So I have them "try to work on iReady 20-30 minutes/week." I feel that they are already spending a lot of time in front of a screen each day.

We try to have special days and adjust the activities accordingly. We did a virtual egg hunt (used photos of our playground and familiar places around our small town), directed drawing-bunny, listened to Pete the Cat's Big Easter Adventure, mystery picture using number grid-bunny, decorated an egg.. right before spring break.

We are doing Google Meets to stay connected with our students and to keep them connected to each other. It is good to have a theme or purpose for your GM. Some of my students have been shy. It makes it easier for them if they can share a drawing they made or show an object.

It is a lot of work!!!! I work with a great team of colleagues-we divide and conquer the workload as far as planning and making the lesson videos and creating the Seesaw activities. The first 2 weeks were overwhelming because we didn't know ahead of time that we were sending home the iPads. We had to work out some glitches and get the parents comfortable with the technology. The students already used Seesaw in school so they knew how to do things to access activities, take photos, post. Plus, teachers had to figure out how to do the lessons. I think we have our groove back, which is good since the governor just announced the earliest we might go back is May 15th. When we left school, we left thinking it was for 2 weeks. We just finished Week 5.

All, but two, of my students have been doing the online stuff. The two, who aren't, are students who had a lot of absences and tardies before we started doing school at home so I wasn't surprised. The principal hand delivered iPads to guarantee that each student had an iPad. She worked with free/reduced lunch students' parents to get free internet from Comcast for them. Teachers have reached out to students/parents who have been MIA online. The principal has reached out. The decision was made that those students have missed 5 weeks of school so far. Our interventionists are creating grade level packets of materials that will be mailed out to those students every two weeks.

I just want to go back to school, be in my classroom and see my students face-to-face.



Last edited by iteachk2010; 04-18-2020 at 10:31 AM..
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Old 04-18-2020, 05:02 PM
 
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I have a parent who is actually sending us extra work, aside from the work we are giving her. She has been using TPT for kindergarten reading sheets (I believe) and our state common core website, doing 1st grade modules and starting to go over these with her child now. Any work done gets filed into a student portfolio for each student once a parent sends a photo or scan. This family is also utilizing reading eggs, teach your monster, Kumon, and more.

Wonder why this parent does not take the same initiative?
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Old 04-18-2020, 06:00 PM
 
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Thank you teachers for your generous responses. I feel very blessed and encouraged. You have given me some great ideas!
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Old 04-18-2020, 06:48 PM
 
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Our directive was to not teach any new material for the rest of the year. Just practice and review.

Our grade level puts together a menu of options each week, many of which are worksheets and games that can be printed for families who still don't have online access. We also post some videos and activity links on google classroom, and kids with online access have Lexia and Dreambox they can use. There is also a daily calendar posted that reflects what our in class calendar would have been (we use Bridges so we took it from there) with some questions to answer.

We do a whole class zoom meeting once a week, everyone's in a small group meeting once a week, and then we do a one on one check in once a week.


We've also posted a lot of other resources for parents that want them. Games and cards from our math program, teacher read-alouds, science videos, etc.
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We've streamlined our insruction
Old 04-18-2020, 07:22 PM
 
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At first I was giving plans as if I was writing them for a substitute, with every subject, snack breaks, with video links and recordings of me doing read-alouds every day. After the first 2 weeks, the administrators came up with a streamlined schedule where we teach 3 subjects a day, and reinforce the others. For example, if it's not a day we teach math, they practice facts for 15 minutes.

So, we have a class ZOOM meeting once a week. I meet with the girls for 15 minutes and then the boys for 15 minutes. This is to keep connected with me and with each other. During the week I set up half hour time slots so I meet with each child individually. We mostly do reading- I share the screen and they read books to me from the RazKids website. I can do running records using my document camera so I can keep them moving foreward.

For the content lessons, I mostly use my document camera and screen with Quicktime. I record the screen and my voice for direct instruction. I still end with a video of me doing a read-aloud, one of our favorite parts of the day.

I have a couple whose parents either are working outside the home, or one is and the other is working from home and has little ones to deal with. For those families I sent e-copies of work they can print out and have the children so somewhat independently. Most of our work is online, either viewing recorded lessons or videos, and reading and math websites. If they don't have help, they really can't do much.

The saying our P reminds us of is "Maslow before Bloom." Everyone is doing their best, and as long as we keep our connection with them, we'll get them caught up with we get them back in school, whenever that may be.

We can only do our best.
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Old 04-23-2020, 11:16 AM
 
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I agree with the others and have the same experiences. Zoom isn't allowed and even if it was, I'd have minimal engagement. I email weekly, gave parents a list of resources, and FaceTime or call students and families upon request. No work is required and we've been told not to teach anything new. Granted, this is a public school so mostly that's because of lack of resources and parent involvement.

I'd suggest putting the work on the mother. Tell her that you'd be happy to provide education opportunities for her child. Tell them that one of the most important things in Kindergarten is writing (which I firmly believe in). Instruct the mother to get her child a journal and have her write a page a day. Then tell the mom to email you pictures of the work daily and you'll provide feedback and prompts if needed.

I'd bet the mom gets tired of sending pictures daily. You can just send her one of those prompt lists and give generic feedback. Then if parent complains you can tell admin that you provided opportunities.


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Kinder lessons
Old 04-29-2020, 10:56 PM
 
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Reading: make connections, sequence, model retelling

Phonics: model digraphs and blends, practice listening to the sounds in words, sight words

Writing: modeled writing lessons (sentences, punctuation, listening to sounds in words, speaking sight words correctly)

Math: curriculum videos

Our district also has access to 6 different supplemental programs for reading, math, and science.
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zoom
Old 04-30-2020, 05:53 PM
 
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I have added zoom to my schedule that I have posted above. ( Greyhoundgirl and Munchkins helped a lot)

I am doing whole group meetings 2 times per week --40 min . max


I am doing small group reading 2 times per week 20 min. each group


On whole group day I range from 6-16 students out of 24 . In my school that is considered very good participation . Especially since I have an EXTREMELY challenging group.
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