activites for the 4 types of sentences - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Sixth Grade

activites for the 4 types of sentences

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
jonesey6 jonesey6 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 20
New Member

jonesey6
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 20
New Member
activites for the 4 types of sentences
Old 08-19-2008, 07:45 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

We are in our first "teaching" week. I just wondered if anyone had some new ideas to help teach the 4 types of sentences. We also are suppose to know interjections. Any ideas? Thanks


jonesey6 is offline   Reply With Quote

imalith's Avatar
imalith imalith is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,379
Blog Entries: 29
Senior Member

imalith
 
imalith's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,379
Senior Member
4 types of sentences
Old 08-19-2008, 11:41 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I've never really understood having the students memorize the names for the 4 types of sentences, though I have taught that as well.

One activity would be to hand out 4 sticky notes. During their silent reading, have them identify the different types of sentences and write each on a different sticky note. Put up butcher paper with the names of the different types of sentences on each different colored paper. Ask students to place their sentences on the appropriate paper. Review the results.
imalith is offline   Reply With Quote
teachermlb teachermlb is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 287
Full Member

teachermlb
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 287
Full Member
Something Fun
Old 08-19-2008, 01:11 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I found this idea in a book a couple years ago. I have the students write a "Great Sentence Caper." They write a play with four characters. Each character can only speak in one type of sentence. The play is a mystery and it usually is only about 10-20 lines long. It is usually titled "The Case of the Missing ____"

An example would be:

Grandpa: Where are my glasses? (interrogative)
Grandma: Check the drawer. (imperative)
Grandpa: Do you think they would be there? (interrogative)
Billy: Something is wrong with the dog! (exclamatory)
Grandma: Stop shouting. (imperative)
Jill: The dog is wearing your glasses, Grandpa. (declarative)
Grandpa: Can you believe that? (interrogative)

Obviously, that is just a simple example. But you can see that each time Grandpa speaks, he uses an interrogative sentence. Grandma speaks in imperative, Billy in exclamatory, and Jill in declarative. When writing the play, each type of sentence needs to be represented at least twice. My students LOVE this activity because they have learned types of sentences every year and it gives them a way to review that's fun.

Edited to add: The name of the book where I find this idea is Awesome Hands-on Activities For Teaching Grammar. I bought it from Amazon.com. Here is the link: http://www.amazon.com/Awesome-Hands-..._bxgy_b_text_b

Last edited by teachermlb; 08-19-2008 at 01:45 PM.. Reason: To add the link to the book in which I found this idea
teachermlb is offline   Reply With Quote
stormluvr's Avatar
stormluvr stormluvr is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 350
Full Member

stormluvr
 
stormluvr's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 350
Full Member

Old 08-19-2008, 01:28 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

teachermlb: I love your idea!! I teach 5th, and this would be right up their alley! Thanks
stormluvr is offline   Reply With Quote
meekster's Avatar
meekster meekster is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 595
Senior Member

meekster
 
meekster's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 595
Senior Member
Another option
Old 08-19-2008, 01:43 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

that is related to imalith's post would be to label each wall with a type of sentence. As you call out sentences they either face the correct wall or go to that wall.


meekster is offline   Reply With Quote
PLG
Old 08-19-2008, 07:36 PM
This message has been deleted by PLG.
PLG PLG is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 77
Junior Member

PLG
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 77
Junior Member
Activities for types of sentences
Old 08-19-2008, 07:39 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

As a quick review assessment for types of sentences, I distribute cards that have the words Imperative, Interrogative, Exclamatory, and Declarative along with the appropriate punctuation mark. (Xerox each type of sentence on different color piece of paper.)

First, I read a sentence. I give students a few seconds to decide which type of sentence. After reading the sentence the second time students must hold up, at relatively the same time, the appropriate sentence type/punctuation card. (I try to have students hold up cards at the same time, so they donít rely on their neighbors for the answer.)

By using different colored paper, I can identify which students knew the correct answer and which students had trouble. If students hold up the wrong card, I can quickly review the reason for the incorrect response.

If you plan on making the cards write the type of sentence on a word document four times spacing them apart. I cut the paper in half and then in half again. It also makes it easer to store cards.

I adapt this activity in math. On different color paper, I write place values places. I also use greater than, less than or equal symbols. For true/false questions, I use red and green pieces of paper.
PLG is offline   Reply With Quote
imalith's Avatar
imalith imalith is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,379
Blog Entries: 29
Senior Member

imalith
 
imalith's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,379
Senior Member
Question for everyone
Old 08-20-2008, 05:27 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I still don't understand why it would be important for kids to know the names of the different sentence types. It's not we don't know how to use them. Any insight for me?
imalith is offline   Reply With Quote
teachermlb teachermlb is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 287
Full Member

teachermlb
 
Joined: Jun 2008
Posts: 287
Full Member

Old 08-21-2008, 05:35 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

imalith - I'm not sure why it's important either, but it is in our contant standards, so I teach it.
teachermlb is offline   Reply With Quote
jayteach11 jayteach11 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 36
Junior Member

jayteach11
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 36
Junior Member
4 types of sentences
Old 08-21-2008, 05:43 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

it makes sense, it's the foundation of everything else. I always thought that structure should be taught first(naming and telling parts).

As far as ways to teach it, I've been working on a song to explain the 4 types of sentences, maybe set to a simple tv jingle(like the Addams Family.)
jayteach11 is offline   Reply With Quote
jennraebe jennraebe is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 14
New Member

jennraebe
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 14
New Member
Do have a smart board or other technology?
Old 09-04-2008, 11:57 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

I found a lot of great lessons and powerpoints online! I great resource is Pete's Powerpoints.com. Google that website. It's wonderful!


jennraebe is offline   Reply With Quote
imalith's Avatar
imalith imalith is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,379
Blog Entries: 29
Senior Member

imalith
 
imalith's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,379
Senior Member
sentences
Old 09-08-2008, 04:25 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

Yes, I understand. I just wondered if it was valuable in some way that I am missing. I know that sometimes kids are tested on that.
imalith is offline   Reply With Quote
Meggin's Avatar
Meggin Meggin is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 976
Senior Member

Meggin
 
Meggin's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 976
Senior Member
Sentence types
Old 09-08-2008, 04:41 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

I put together the "Captalization and Punctuation" collection for ProTeacher and came across a great idea for a game to reinforce learning sentence types. It's here. I played it with my class this year and really saw an improvement in their test scores. I'm going to use it to review the sentence types before we have benchmark testing.

(I used a Pringles can to make the Kaboom can. I decorated it with red paper so it sorta looks like a stick of dynamite.)
Meggin is offline   Reply With Quote
Ms. GiGi
 
 
Guest

Ms. GiGi
 
 
Guest

Old 09-15-2009, 12:31 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

I think your idea is great!
Students practice writing and language skills with one lesson.
I plan to try this lesson with my third graders. I hope it goes well.
  Reply With Quote
gt
 
 
Guest

gt
 
 
Guest
Kaboom!
Old 09-26-2009, 04:29 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

Love this! I need a hands-on game for my kids with my evaluation coming up. I am so excited to see them play this! I know they will love it. Thanks for the information!
  Reply With Quote
Mozaiko
 
 
Guest

Mozaiko
 
 
Guest
Kaboom!
Old 11-19-2011, 08:58 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

I think this is a very good activity. Simple to prepare but fun to do. I teach Grade 2 and Grade 3 for Grammar & Spelling.
  Reply With Quote
Ms. Rob
 
 
Guest

Ms. Rob
 
 
Guest
High School Teacher Input
Old 11-21-2011, 07:49 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

I'll tell you why students should know the names of sentence types.

Every profession names their tools, so that a member of the profession can discuss the tools and their appropriate usage. Imagine a mechanic saying, "Hey hand me that long silvery stick thing with the pointy end." It wouldn't make sense. It is much better for the mechanics and assistants to know the names of the tools like "screwdriver" and "hammer."

I teach high school English III and AP English Language. When we are discussing the effect of using certain types of sentences readers, and why sentence combining can be a powerful way of connecting ideas, it is not helpful for me to say, "Make these sentences longer cuz..." No, it is more powerful for me to be able to name my tools: "The author uses these two interogative sentences here to draw the reader in. How would this paragraph be different if only declarative sentences were used? Why does this author choose to use a periodic sentence here instead of saying what he means up front... etc..."

My job is much more difficult when my students do not already know the names of things that they should have learned in grade school. Just some food for thought.
  Reply With Quote
DebbyMAE
 
 
Guest

DebbyMAE
 
 
Guest
Teacher
Old 11-26-2011, 06:01 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

I teach 4th grade and feel it is important to teach the type of sentences. Our kids need the foundation to become better writers and understand why we use different types of sentences.
  Reply With Quote
Loolycoff Loolycoff is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 1
New Member

Loolycoff
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 1
New Member
Wot do u think?
Old 02-29-2012, 05:50 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

If I used a request (Imperative) sentence - as follows:
May you hand me this bottle, please?
OR
Will you lend me 10 pounds, please?

Will it be considered as an imperative or an interrogative sentence?

Also, will your tone change a sentence from declarative to exclamatory and vise versa?

I just won the lottery!

I just won the lottery.
Loolycoff is offline   Reply With Quote
Readn gal's Avatar
Readn gal Readn gal is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 502
Senior Member

Readn gal
 
Readn gal's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 502
Senior Member
interrogative
Old 03-05-2012, 07:19 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

a question is a question. You are still asking.
Readn gal is offline   Reply With Quote
Phyllis's Avatar
Phyllis Phyllis is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,333
Senior Member

Phyllis
 
Phyllis's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 3,333
Senior Member
Give the students one topic . . .
Old 03-05-2012, 10:10 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

. . . and have them write each type of sentence about that.

Example: CAT (on the simplest level)

My cat has been missing since last night.
Do you think she ran away or got lost?
Please help me look for my cat.
I was astonished to find my cat asleep ON the refrigerator!
Phyllis is offline   Reply With Quote
ChristinaG
 
 
Guest

ChristinaG
 
 
Guest
Slp
Old 03-06-2012, 12:37 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

I believe it all ties back to language sampling, and variation in sentence structures.

When doing a language sample an excellent indicator of complexity and understanding the structure of language is to analyze the sample by the 4 different sentence types to see if all are present.

As there is a direct link between what we say and what we write, this was added into state standards to teach that complexity not naturally occurring in student's language, with a first step of being able to identify the various types, then to actually use them and possess them in their own writing and speaking.
  Reply With Quote
Readn gal's Avatar
Readn gal Readn gal is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 502
Senior Member

Readn gal
 
Readn gal's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 502
Senior Member
types of sentences
Old 03-07-2012, 06:16 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #22

I understand that learning "interrogative, declarative, etc." is a standard, but it seems that really focusing on "simple, compound, complex etc" would be time better spent. I think my students understand when a sentence is a "question". I don't know why we need to teach them to call it an interrogative". I would rather have them master a solid complex sentence.

I also believe that higher level sentence variety skill is changing the way a setence starts, such as with a gerund, prepositional phrase, adjective first, etc.

The reason kids do not master the vocabulary for the 4 types is because all teachers do not use that vocabulary consistantly in the classroom. How often do we teach the four types and then rather than say, please include an interrogative sentence, we say please include a question? If we aren't going to make it common language than it is just another lesson taught and forgotten.
Readn gal is offline   Reply With Quote
Whanda
 
 
Guest

Whanda
 
 
Guest
Sentence Types
Old 07-11-2012, 04:52 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #23

Things are as valuable as you choose to make them. How about relating the type name to other vocabulary? For example, interrogative relates to an interrogation when there is a crime. You could extend the students' vocabulary and word relationships by creating interactive word webs and show them the 4 types of sentences at the same time. Sometimes we have to find our own meaning in what others require us to teach for a test...
  Reply With Quote
johnderecutie
 
 
Guest

johnderecutie
 
 
Guest
Fourth grade teacher
Old 07-13-2012, 04:52 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #24

THANK YOU!!!! Having a language to talk about what we want our students to do is SO IMPORTANT. Thanks for recognizing that! This post was from a long time ago, so I'm not sure you will get it, but I was frustrated by the earlier responses.
  Reply With Quote
Karen02
 
 
Guest

Karen02
 
 
Guest
3rd grade teacher
Old 09-03-2012, 12:48 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #25

Thank you for sharing! I have been teaching for 11 years and I am always looking for new ideas!!!
  Reply With Quote
MrsT1 MrsT1 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 8
New Member

MrsT1
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 8
New Member
Sentence Types
Old 09-07-2012, 12:33 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #26

I love this idea! Thanks for sharing!
MrsT1 is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Sixth Grade
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:29 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net