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RamonaQ RamonaQ is offline
 
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Morning Meeting
Old 07-18-2012, 09:23 AM
 
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I am thinking about doing Morning Meeting with my students this year. However, I don't think I will have time to do it everyday. Does anyone do a condensed version of MM once or twice a week? How has it worked for you?


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We do morning meeting daily
Old 07-18-2012, 12:07 PM
 
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We take about 15-30 minutes each morning to do greeting(for sure), sharing(but that is sometimes moved to a different time of day, activity(we plan, but many days we run out of time), news and announcements--everyday on smartboard when students come in. There is always some activity for them and it gives an overview of our day-sometimes a "this day in history.." The kids get frustrated with me if we miss our greeting. Just keep trying to make it a priority.
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I do a micro Morning Meeting
Old 07-18-2012, 08:48 PM
 
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I only have 15 minutes with my students each morning before we start our grade level rotations. When they walk in, I have the seating assignment for the day and a quick message. (Sometimes they have to sit in number order, boy-girl-boy girl, by height, etc.) I always do a quick greeting, discuss important issues, and end with our pledge. There isn' time for anything else.

At the end of every day, I have the students write me a quick note about a social problem, a question they might have, or anything else. They write everything from "I like burritos." to "I had trouble in math today." I turn some of these notes into our daily discussion/brainstorming. "What can we do do make someone feel more welcome at the lunch tables?"

My class absolutely loved the mini MMs!! I know I'm not following the official schedule, but it's all I have time for!!
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dividends worth it
Old 07-20-2012, 11:16 AM
 
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I did Morning Meeting every day in 3rd grade, with the goal of creating caring community in the classroom. It worked beautifully, with many different combinations of kids. Subs, visitors, specialists often noted how much more thoughtful my kids were.

The Meeting always started with the greeting (had a poster with greeting in languages from around the world), the calendar, the daily number line (how many days in school) and "Big News." For many years, we did the non-competitive fun activity (skill games, logic puzzles, exercise), but that went by the wayside, a "time on task" teach to the test casualty. Total time was usually 10 minutes. A little bell sat in the tray near the calendar for the leader to call the Meeting to order.

For the first few days, I led the meeting, modeled the format. Then, I went through the class alphabetically, teaching them to be the meeting leader. First round, I stood side by side and paired with each leader. Second round, I moved a few seats away. By third round, most were quite seasoned and took off!! The tone was set for being a great leader, using an appropriate voice, respecting the group.

The part I learned was that kids needed to learn and practice communicating effectively with one another. They really had to learn to listen to one another and then respond in a meaningful way. So many wanted to just pick someone to share big news and then jump to the next person. I jumped in lots at the beginning to help with developing questions that would elicit conversation. They picked it up, just needed the opportunity. It helped develop better skills for partner and small group activities, too.

The dividends made me dedicate the time each year. Kids learned to be leaders, to lead the class, to recognize one another with respect, to interact in positive, caring conversations. Natural leaders learned to acknowledge others more easily. More introspective kids learned that they could lead. It really created an atmosphere of respect and caring at the beginning of each day. They knew the names of everyone in their class!! It also gave a framework for dealing with classroom "issues" in a cooperative way - we'd discuss what the problem was and what we might do about it, just a few minutes worth of attention often solved little things before they got any bigger. Amazing is when they do it without you being involved at all!!

You also get to learn a lot more about the kids - who goes places, who doesn't, what goes on after school, hobbies, sports, tournaments, etc. That part you have to watch out for, opening up for "Big News" - you never know what might come up and you have to be ready to tackle what comes up! Current events get covered, the good, the bad and the ugly. If you keep the tone to "BIG News" - important to ALL of us, you can avoid the "It's my step dad's daughter's dog's birthday" stuff. I used "Big News" to let the kids know of any classroom news - assemblies, field trips, guests. The kids got a kick out of "calling" on the teacher.

Give it a go! If you find value in it, it's worth the time in the long run.
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