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Lenora5
 
 
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Student Sent Right Back. Have to Vent
Old 03-11-2020, 02:17 PM
 
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Class from hell. A fifth grade student today was disrupting the class, bothering other students, and refusing to do work. I talked with her, moved her, and tried my best to get her on task. I finally decided to send her to the office. I've never seen a student come back so quickly. You are on your own as a sub. Admin won't do jack for you. The treatment by admin is the same for many teachers. But I knew that would happen anyway. Why this school doesn't have a detention room is a fair question. Won't be returning to this place. It's all over now.


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Bobbies Bobbies is offline
 
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I got in trouble for sending students to offi
Old 03-11-2020, 03:36 PM
 
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At one of the worst high-school in our urban center, I sent several students oit. They assumed I couldn't hane my class or something and complained. I have not gone back since and cancelled all jobs from that location.
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Old 03-11-2020, 06:02 PM
 
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Why this school doesn't have a detention room is a fair question.
Iíve never worked in a school with a detention room.
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Old 03-11-2020, 06:59 PM
 
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I had a very busy 5th today. The teacher told me before class about a student, who I knew from previous jobs. I lasted with the student until about 1:15 when I called the office and asked for the kid to be taken out of the classroom. The AP came, took the student (who later came back to get their belongings), and the child didn't come back after that. This is a student with a reputation so they knew it was a problem. When I saw the teacher after school she told me she was glad I did that. I only call the office when it becomes unbearable and I felt very lucky to have been taken seriously. I'm sorry they did not do the same for you.
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Old 03-11-2020, 11:27 PM
 
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I have said many times I rarely bother calling security anymore for high school. The kids come back within a half hour or less and are often worse and just realize I am powerless to stop them. At least in middle school they will remove them from the classroom for the period. They do have their phones which does seem to pacify the worst behaved kids or they will often just not show up to class or leave shortly after it starts. But yeah, security is a joke.


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MaineSub MaineSub is offline
 
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Old 03-12-2020, 04:42 AM
 
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Quote:
I only call the office when it becomes unbearable and I felt very lucky to have been taken seriously.
Yep... personally, I view calling the office (or sending a kid there) as an admission of defeat, that, more often than not accomplishes little or nothing to improve the situation. In some cases, it actually plays right into the hands of the perpetrator. He or she "wins" by getting thrown out.

On one occasion, I called and asked for help when an elementary special needs student ended up crawling around on the floor, rubbing his glasses on the floor, etc. We'd been ignoring him but I was concerned he'd damage his glasses and that justified a call. I explained the situation when I called. The office sent someone who created a bigger distraction, didn't solve the problem, and left me with a bigger mess, including him still crawling around, rubbing his glasses on the floor.

I'm a pretty fast learner.

I do think there's a difference between calling for help and sending kids to the office.

I actually have a reputation for NOT sending kids to the office. Everybody (including the office) knows it would have to be REALLY bad if I did. (We're a relatively small school; I've been there for over a decade.) Thanks to that reputation, I rarely have to even consider doing it.
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Old 03-12-2020, 06:26 AM
 
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The middle school I frequently work at has a "Student Responsibility Center," aka detention room. Teachers' notes almost always advise that impossible kids be sent there. And once there, they are never sent back. Every school should be set up like that.
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Old 03-12-2020, 09:01 AM
 
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I've never heard of a detention room, either.

The only high schools I've worked in that send students back to class are the ones with the never-ending 1 1/2 hour block schedules.

I think there needs to be a point where students are sent out. I rarely do it, but when I need to, I do. I don't consider it that they won. I consider it respecting myself to not put up with their crap. Since I do it so rarely, they take me seriously when I do.
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Several Warnings, Then Out
Old 03-12-2020, 08:45 PM
 
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@bodimom, I agree with you. I rarely send students to the principal, and I give them a couple warnings first. After that, I might have to move them. The last straw is to have them write a reflection, claim the misbehavior , and write down and or express the ways to improve. I consider the grade level for what's appropriate for this. With the reflection, admin will see that I'm doing some things before I send them.

If student doesn't comply and makes a joke of it, then I send him or her with that paper and classwork to the office or to neighboring teacher. The teacher will know when I send them. By the way, teachers often team up and create their own "detention rooms, study halls, or time out rooms or centers." (however you want to call it) I did this with fellow teachers when I was an elementary teacher, and other teachers do it at some of the schools I've been subbing in, just not at this particular one. I used the term "detention room" loosely, not in it's conventional sense. For me, when students are disruptive, obnoxious, and wasting everybody's time, I'll send them to admin.


You see, some students think that you won't send them to the office, and they try to take advantage of it. I've seen students get surprised when they are sent. However, there are other students who will not be phased if you send them to the office or whatever you do. Those students are the most difficult to deal with because they've already been through the cycle many times over. Though difficult, I just deal with it for the rest of the day if they can't go anywhere else.

However, I do believe that schools these days need to bring back official study halls, detention centers or rooms (whatever name people want to call it) like in the old days.
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