Classroom Library - Picture books and easy chapter books? - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Fifth Grade

Classroom Library - Picture books and easy chapter books?

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
ellie523 ellie523 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 66
Junior Member

ellie523
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 66
Junior Member
Classroom Library - Picture books and easy chapter books?
Old 07-22-2010, 10:55 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Right now I am going through all of the stuff from my 2nd grade classroom and sorting out the things I will be taking with me to my new 5th grade classroom. I am having a hard time wrapping my mind about what books from my classroom library are inappropriate for 5th grade.

Do you have any picture books in your library? If so, how do you choose which ones to add, and which to leave out? For example, I have a large collection of Caldecott winners and honor books because we did a Caldecott Challenge in 2nd grade. Many of these are fantastic books, but would they be out of place, or set low expectations in a 5th grade room? What about "favorite" books from earlier grades? (Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs, Alexander and the Terrible..., Chrysanthemum, etc?) Are there any that you love to use as mentor texts or for instruction?

What about "easy" chapter books? I mean, surely Horrible Harry has no place in 5th grade, right? What about Junie B.? Captain Underpants? Geronimo Stilton? My Weird School? Is there a certain "hard and fast" rule for making the decision?

If you do have picture books and easy chapter books, do you have students that get stuck reading books that are too easy for them? Any input on the library issue would be very helpful to me. TIA!


ellie523 is offline   Reply With Quote

Sam5's Avatar
Sam5 Sam5 is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,366
Senior Member

Sam5
 
Sam5's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,366
Senior Member

Old 07-22-2010, 11:46 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I use picture books all the time for mini-lessons both for reading and writing. I also let my students read picture books from time to time. You will definitely have students who are still reading at a level where the easy chapter books you mentions will be appropriate. Some students will have fond memories of those type of books and want to read some of them even if they have a higher reading level. I let them some of the time. I just don't let them all of the time. I make sure I have a huge variety of books that are at their level to choose from.
Sam5 is offline   Reply With Quote
ajmom's Avatar
ajmom ajmom is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 446
Senior Member

ajmom
 
ajmom's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 446
Senior Member
Picture book thoughts
Old 07-22-2010, 12:14 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I moved from 1st to 5th and also wondered what to do with all of my picture books. I thought they would be too "babyish" for them. I waited until around Christmas and put a few of my favorite Christmas books out...they went wild! They loved being able to read through them during extra minutes. After that, I would bring in any picture books I had that went with whatever unit we were on. They knew that these books were not to be used for assigned book reports...they were more just for fun. I also plan on implementing the 6 traits of writing this year and will use picture books with that. My only regret...I didn't save more of my picture books! I find myself thinking "I wish I hadn't left such-and-such" Good luck!
ajmom is offline   Reply With Quote
ellie523 ellie523 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 66
Junior Member

ellie523
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 66
Junior Member
ok good, i think...
Old 07-22-2010, 12:14 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Thanks you so much for your response. I really do want to have a variety of books for every student regardless of their level, so I it is helpful to know I am not underestimating my kids by thinking some of my 2nd grade stuff might be appropriate.

I hope you don't mind if I ask a bit more... I have a TON of Junie B and Horrible Harry. A lot of Magic Treehouse, A to Z Mystery, etc. Would you just pick the greatest hits and create a basket of easy books for the library? How would you label it to be sensitive to the students who may be at that level? (I don't want to call them easy if they are "just right" for some.) How do you "police" the you can read this sometimes but not all the time issue?

For your picture books that you use for instruction, do you keep them in a teacher location, or in your actual library? Do any titles stand out as perfect for 5th grade instruction?

Thanks so much for letting me pester you with all this. I'm nervous about the switch and am probably just over thinking everything, but i really want this year to be great! Thanks again for all your help!
ellie523 is offline   Reply With Quote
ellie523 ellie523 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 66
Junior Member

ellie523
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 66
Junior Member
ajmom
Old 07-22-2010, 12:23 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

That is a really good way to look at it. I am thinking to myself that I LOVE reading picture books, not all the time of course, but so many really do bring a smile to my face. It just doesn't seem right to forbid students to read them, sometimes anyway... I like your approach. I will definitely have to keep my picture books close at hand. Thanks again!


ellie523 is offline   Reply With Quote
mavist's Avatar
mavist mavist is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 196
Blog Entries: 1
Full Member

mavist
 
mavist's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 196
Full Member
Both
Old 07-22-2010, 12:43 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

I have many picture books in my library. In fact I believe it is a type of addiction. I have taught 5th for 16 years and no matter what level of class I have they love those. I use them a lot now for mini-lessons with reading and writing, I have found some fun ones to kick of a math concept or social studies lesson. I just think that they are wonderful!!
I also have a big variety of easy chapter books. I actually started getting those when I realized I had some kids who were not reading at a 5th grade level.
We have been using the Fountas and Pinnell method of Reader's Workshop and many teachers had a hard time wondering if you had easy books then they would only read easy books. I truly don't think that is true. I look at their reading responses and conferences and if I think they are stuck in a rut, work on picking out that just right book. I do know that I feel that with my special ed kids, I can have levels from K-9 in my room!! So If you have the room I would definately hang on to those books.
I just kept my easier chapter books in their own baskets with labels of the series, some I just put into baskets of its genre. That way I don't have to worry about that label.
I also just keep my picture books on the shelf. I tried to just keep them back for me, but always had kids who wanted to read them I felt like if I wanted to encourage that love of reading that no book was off limits!

Last edited by mavist; 07-22-2010 at 12:52 PM.. Reason: add on
mavist is offline   Reply With Quote
Sam5's Avatar
Sam5 Sam5 is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,366
Senior Member

Sam5
 
Sam5's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,366
Senior Member

Old 07-22-2010, 01:07 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I have two baskets in my classroom library titled "Short Books." My students helped me sort my books into categories a few years ago, and one of my better readers suggested this category. She said,"Sometimes you just need a short book- like when you are in the middle of a series and waiting for the next one to come in or when you are reading a really thick book and you just need a break from it for a little while." We put the Magic Treehouse, Junie B. Jones, etc... in that basket. If I were you, I might make a few baskets of them and keep the others handy if you find out you need them.

I keep my nonfiction picture books on my shelves organized by wide categories- history, science, animals, etc... My other picture books I have on my "teacher" shelf along with special books I keep ahold of for read alouds and I don't want to disappear. I usually put a basket of picture books we use as mentor texts out on a shelf separate from my library.
Sam5 is offline   Reply With Quote
ilteacher's Avatar
ilteacher ilteacher is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 321
Full Member

ilteacher
 
ilteacher's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2007
Posts: 321
Full Member

Old 07-22-2010, 02:43 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

I like the "Short Books" idea! I'm going to use that in my library this year!
ilteacher is offline   Reply With Quote
hollyhocks's Avatar
hollyhocks hollyhocks is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 61
Junior Member

hollyhocks
 
hollyhocks's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 61
Junior Member
Picture Books
Old 07-22-2010, 04:47 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

High quality picture books are great tools for teaching writing techniques. They can show how character, voice, setting can be developed, etc. You can use them to teach theme, author message, figurative language without reading long books. In short, they are great for modeling.
I have also found that shorter books such as picture books make a fine alternative for my low readers (3 and below) when they have to do monthly, independent book reports. They can read books several times to really get all the story elements. This is one way I can differentiate for my readers.
hollyhocks is offline   Reply With Quote
AtTheGrove's Avatar
AtTheGrove AtTheGrove is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 17
New Member

AtTheGrove
 
AtTheGrove's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 17
New Member
Wish I'd thought of that!
Old 07-22-2010, 05:44 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

I have a "Chapter Books with Picture" basket..."Short Books" is SO much better.

I am keeping ALL my picture books in my library and have a Junie B basket and Magic Treehouse and Boxcar Children baskets too. I control what the kids get to take from the library to avoid them always read "easy" books. I am careful NEVER to call them that, because as mentioned, all kids are at different levels.

My kids must have 2 books on their level
1 informational
1 Free pick

(in their bag or basket)

They also know how to pick a "Just Right" book too. That helps!

Great ideas! I'll be using them!


AtTheGrove is offline   Reply With Quote
magnolia57's Avatar
magnolia57 magnolia57 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 384
Full Member

magnolia57
 
magnolia57's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2010
Posts: 384
Full Member

Old 07-22-2010, 06:21 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

Ellie,
I use picture books all the time in 5th grade. Many make great introductions to writing as someone said. For example, you know those twisted fairy tales? I read a few of those aloud along with the traditional version. Then, we brainstorm a list of ‘regular’ fairy tales, check some out from the library, and the kids write their own ‘Fractured Fairy Tales.” I always have to get them from the library, but you may already have some!

In our standards, but not in the basal (big surprise right?) is direct and indirect characterization. I use The Cat in the Hat to teach that concept. Because Cat is soooo simple, it is much easier to use to convey such an abstract concept.

And don’t even get me started on using picture books for introducing or complimenting history lessons!! The National Council for the Social Studies has lists of “Notable Tradebooks For Young People.” http://www.socialstudies.org/notable I am developing lessons on several of these titles for our Teaching American History Grant. You know what? Even the high school history teachers liked them!

I like the idea of creating a basket of short books for the library, but I wouldn’t keep all of them. I’d just pick the greatest hits like you mentioned. You do want to have some easier things for your less able readers, but you DON’T want to have too many so that your children are not motivated to read longer/more challenging books.
magnolia57 is offline   Reply With Quote
notartteacher notartteacher is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 257
Full Member

notartteacher
 
Joined: Aug 2008
Posts: 257
Full Member
low readers?
Old 07-23-2010, 12:32 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

I am moving up with my 4th graders to 5th grade and I had some low readers. We use AR and I had to take more low books for a few students to read. Wait and see what kind of class you have.
notartteacher is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Fifth Grade
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:49 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net