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Barclay Barclay is offline
 
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Barclay
 
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Are you taken seriously?
Old 11-30-2005, 09:40 PM
 
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I decided to try subbing 1 1/2 year ago. I quickly became an active sub, and found that I really love being in the classroom. Only now I am in a bit of a pickle. I find that I am not being taken seriously as a candidate for full-time or permanent positions, because "you are a wonderful sub" or my recent favorite, "we don't want to lose our favorite sub in the building, we can use you anywhere..."
Am I crazy to think a person in their mid-forties has a chance to land a full-time teaching job??? Thanks for any and all comments.


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No!
Old 12-01-2005, 04:00 PM
 
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I was in a very similar situation. I am sure that your situation will not improve in the same way that mine did, but it can improve. (We moved to a new state with my husband's job) You are not crazy to think that you can (and should) land a full-time teaching position. You might try putting your application in at a different district if you live in an area where that is possible. If not, you might try letting the school know how you feel about the way they are treating you. Just a couple of questions. Do you have a degree in Education? If so, is it a recently acquired degree? Good luck in your quest to get that first teaching job!
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Barclay Barclay is offline
 
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Old 12-01-2005, 08:03 PM
 
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Thanks for the words of advice. I am not usually a "whiner", but I am getting frustrated. My undergrad degree is in education, my Masters is in another field. I have worked at a variety of jobs, (my husband's job involved a lot of moving) but now we are here to stay.
I think I will start looking at neighboring districts.
Thanks again.
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Are they serious with their comments?
Old 12-05-2005, 10:14 AM
 
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Are they seriously trying to get you to stop working on your certification so you can remain a sub? I have my favorite sub, too, but I would support her 100% if she decided to become a teacher. Yes, I would miss having her in my room while I was out, but, come on!

I applaud you for going after your certification, and best of luck to you. Ignore the saps, you're going to be great!!!
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Don't give up!
Old 12-14-2005, 08:56 PM
 
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I also have been subbing at my daughter's high school for the last year and & half. I'm on the 'A' list & usually work every single day. I've been approached by administration, teachers, (even students!) about going ahead & becoming a 'real teacher'. Today I was offered a reading teacher position for the fall, working with lower level readers. (My BS is in social work & my MS is in management. Now I have to go through the paperwork to get a temporary teaching certificate in what ever subject one can be issued for. I'll also be working on getting my reading endorsement, observing other reading teachers, etc...I live in Florida & they're desperate for teachers!) I'll be team teaching with a wonderful, experienced reading teacher. The whole reading deptartment at our school is fabulous. I'm excited, but I'm also very apprehensive--it's a big commitment--with subbing there was no prep work, papers to grade, political drama, etc.....with your education, experience, etc. the right thing will come along for you. Hang in there!!!


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don't lose hope
Old 01-09-2006, 06:14 PM
 
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Just a short time ago I was in your exact position- the school's supersub!! I never thought I'd land a job this 05-06 school year, but I did. Now I am a busy overwhelmed first year 8th grade teacher at the age of 44! My age, I believe, is a definite asset. Kids "see" me as more experienced than I am because my own children are nearly grown, ect. Plus I have more time (every minute) to devote to my job, which I believe they can sense in a good way. Anyway, it has been fun and very growth promoting and stimulating for me. There's one problem though- in a financially strapped district, there's always next year to worry about!! It is one profession that you can work hard at and never feel like you are doing enough and your "retention" depends on your seniority, ect. I do appreciate everyday in the classroom though and do hope your opportunity comes soon! Best wishes
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you can
Old 01-09-2006, 07:42 PM
 
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You are not crazy. I move a lot with my husband's job-military, and I've gotten full-time teaching jobs. It's easier in some parts of the US than others though. Maybe respond, "Yes, you can use me anywhere even in a classroom full-time." "I make an even greater full-time teacher, because I have so much experience in your school." (sell yourself whenever possible) Put your application in and when they ask you about it, tell them they are first on Your List. Get recommendations from other teachers in writing. You can use them anywhere. Start or continue a portfolio of your experiences. Take pictures, if allowed, of your students working in the room with you. Take any workshops that are available, get on committees if possible. We had building subs, one would come to our staff meetings to make sure she knew what was going on in the school. When I knew I was leaving out of state, I recommended my sub who did these things and she got the job! I was happy for her, she deserved it and so do you. Good luck!!
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Hiring non certified teachers
Old 01-23-2006, 10:27 AM
 
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If Florida has such a shortage of teachers - why not hire the tons of teachers in the midwest who apply each year? I know alot of us apply and are not hired - then we hear about the Florida teacher shortage and how they hire non certified teachers. No offense - but maybe this is why there are TV shows about the low test and low grades of USA students. I am not saying you are not a good teacher - but would you want to go to go to a hospital where they train nurses on the job without proper education? No - hospitals recruit and hire!!! nurses from other geographic locations. I think you should have to have certification before being hired to teach at all - anywhere.
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Sorry, but I observe that older teachers are
Old 10-15-2006, 03:53 AM
 
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not being hired at my school. Older teachers are being pushed out. I never thought that this would be the case but it's plain as day where I teach. Sad but true.
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Old 10-23-2006, 03:18 PM
 
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Even the teachers in Florida with no prior teaching experiance go through a process to ensure they are properly educated. Everyone has to pass the General Knowledge test, subject certification test, and then you are given three years to pass the professional certification test. In those three years you are also to accomplish any classes needed for certification in your subject area. These teachers are not uneducated just because they have changed careers and gone through a different process then an education major. It makes more sense to hire qualified people who are already in Florida then to say, "You don't have a standard teaching certification, so we'd rather hire someone half way across the country."


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