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intheloonybin intheloonybin is offline
 
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intheloonybin
 
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Just burned out!
Old 03-04-2007, 11:26 AM
 
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Stick a fork in me cuz I'm DONE! I'm so frustrated and tired all of the time. After teaching math at a title I middle school for 17 years, I just don't think I can do it anymore. Sometimes my eyes just well up because I feel like I'm trapped in my job. The "you know what" is coming from ALL sides: parents, students and administration, as well as pressures from state testing. Most of the students don't care if they pass or fail. I've made parent phone calls til kingdom come but rarely any change is made. The other day I called about my concerns for a students lack of attention in the classroom, but the dad said they were busy getting ready to eat dinner. The irony? I was having my dinner while making parent calls. THAT'S IT! I really need to get out, but I don't know what other career will have me. Does anyone have any suggestions? Please help me! I'm desperate!


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me too!
 
 
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me too!
 
 
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I feel the same way....
Old 03-10-2007, 11:58 AM
 
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and resigned just this week. I did register for a teacher job fair at the end of the month, but the more I think about it, the more I feel like I just don't want to teach any more. I'm close to a major university and am looking at doing office work--what ever I can find that I'm qualified for after taking a much deserved summer off!!! Just think--working 8-5, not taking work home, no working on stuff over the weekend, no crazy parents or their kids, and an hour for lunch!!

If you still want to work with kids, have you thought about working at a daycare as a preschool teacher or even director?
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ronthefunguy ronthefunguy is offline
 
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Your posting is very sobering
Old 05-18-2007, 12:38 PM
 
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At age 54, I'm considering switching from a high-paying job as a legal secretary, to go back to school for 2 years to get my master's in Special Ed. Your story is exactly what I'm afraid might happen to me. I guess I'm hoping that special ed will be fundamentally different than regular teaching. I love working with sick and abused kids as a volunteer, but I'm afraid making a career of it (and going into debt in the process) will take all the fun and profundity out of it. I really feel for you. If you ever want to chat, please email me at ronthefunguy@mac.com.
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Actor or Teacher?
Old 05-20-2007, 07:43 AM
 
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After 16 years I too am ready to cash it in. Sorry, Loony, I don't have any suggestions.

April and May are always hard knowing that I should really make my decision now if I don't intend to return in August. I should let them know.

I was thinking last week about how my kids get to move on to 6th grade each year, but how I will be held back to repeat 5th grade for the 17th time! I never see these kids "grow up." It's the same thing all over again year after year... the same behaviors, the same deficit of knowledge; next year I'll use the same psychological tricks to manipulate and motivate, and I'll get up on stage and do the same act every day... sure, it has been one of the longest running hits on Broadway, but teaching has become more of a science than an art, more of a recipe of successful routines than a real dynamic. I fool my kids really well, they think it's as fresh to me as day one. I'm the only one who knows the truth, and that can be quite lonely.

I would consider changing grade levels to start fresh, but I've become dependent on the laptop program at our grade level...

Runthefun guy:
Watch out if you're considering teaching as a late second career! You stand a chance of losing all or most of your social security once you begin contributing to the teachers retirment system in your state. The rules are different for different states, and many teachers have been burned when they changed careers. I would check into this before making any changes.
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TXTeacher08 TXTeacher08 is offline
 
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Everything gets old
Old 06-08-2007, 08:00 AM
 
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I have been in a corporate career for the past twenty years and always wanted to teach. It has been in the back of my mind all these years and I applied and was accepted into an alternative teacher certification program for people with their BA.
While you all are burned out on teaching I am burned out on corporate life and am willing to try something new. Maybe I will like it, maybe not. But I am going to try it.
I would suggest that if you are burned out on your teaching career to go ahead and try something else....if all fails...you can always go back to teaching.
Everyday is an opportunity...make the best of it and good luck!


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The Perfect Career
Old 06-22-2007, 08:09 PM
 
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While I can not empathize with you, I do understand your frustration.

I completed a non-licensure early childhood program years ago in NC. After moving to SC (to go to grad school) I tried getting on with the school district but there were too many things that I'd have to return to NC to do. Over the past several years the majority of jobs I've had have been directly linked to early childhood- working in the community, in a district administrative setting, in an ece state initiative, as an early childhood state trainer, and in the past 3 years as an Executive Director in a non-profit. I even earned a Ph. D. in Social Work. I work full time and teach part time for the Univ. of Phoenix. I absolutely love doing that. But after being in so many grant funded initiatives I am tired of the non-profit world, it's instability and the political games that affect the 120 children I serve.

I taught for a few months in NC before quickly being promoted. I've been married now for 8 months and can finally afford to do what I've always wanted to do-teach. I am going to do a quick degree program online at UOP, student teach in the fall,and look to be in a classroom by the end of 2008/beginning of 2009.

I know it sounds like I'm going in reverse but really I'm not. I have the absolute best of both worlds. Teaching is what YOU make of it. I've capitalized on every opportunity that has come my way. I teach adults online, teach teachers, write grants, and will soon be writing curriculum guides. I chose to go back into the classroom because I love the field of early childhood, its all I've ever wanted to do. The non-profit world is also a very stressful and lonely place. I don't want to run anyone's organization- between board meetings, politics, shifts in funding, and staff turnover, you can have it! Give me my 20 children and a circle time rug and it is on!

I've also decided to begin a family. Less stress is best! I don't know if you're frustrated because of the grade level you teach, not having any support, or because the monotny is too much. But with 17 years experience maybe your district could use you in some way or maybe you could even consider consulting. What I'm really saying is that 'grand educators' are very hard to come by. Teaching is not for everyone but for those of us who love children, we'll always find ourselves in that role.

I also work with Title One students so I'm sure the high poverty issues have drained you totally- we see it every day and try in our own way, to address those delicate needs.

Have you the patience or have you ever considered teaching a younger grade, maybe 2nd, 3rd, or 4th?

I hope my words have helped. Maybe you just need a year sabatical to get refreshed. Whatever it is, be sure about your decision. And I will say this, even though it seems like you aren't helping your students, I PROMISE you touched someone's life on last year just through your taking the time to guide them in the classroom.

Blessings on your future endeavours.
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lostinthough
 
 
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sped. life
Old 09-09-2007, 03:48 AM
 
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I read your post and have to reply. I am a 3rd year sped. teacher and I can tell you the administration will chew you up and then spit you out. I know that sounds harsh, and the only great thing about the job is the kids. The paperwork will suffocate you, and you will quickly learn that most school districts really do not care about special ed., so you will be moved from room to room, loaded down with expectations, and offered little, if any support. Sorry for being so negative, but burnout is setting in for me already. I am very dis-illusioned about the whole teaching thing right now. Good luck to you though. Maybe it will be different for you.
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Old 04-20-2008, 08:25 PM
 
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I too am third year but the admin must have someone whispering in his ear since I " dont fit here any more" Like admin would know they never come out of the office to see the classroom, when they do they loom.. dont get me wrong the kids are great is the BS that gets me fustrated with the whole thing... Looking for the round hole for this square peg.
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