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Attention-Getting Behavior
Old 09-26-2017, 04:56 PM
 
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Could someone explain about student attention-getting behavior in which
students run about the classroom being disruptive? I saw it mentioned in a
post. If a student is 'in-your-face' being disruptive, refusing to work, and
making noises; what should a teacher do? The other students are watching,
laughing, and also creating chaos in the room?


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Old 09-26-2017, 05:09 PM
 
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Does the student have a behavior plan in place? I try to make sure I write a plan with really specific language and instructions for how to handle behaviors like this.

I try to ignore the behavior as much as possible. As long as it isn't a unsafe behavior, I ignore and reward the other students for ignoring. If the student amps it up and it gets more intense, then I'll do a room clear but I try to make it seem really exciting like "Since everyone is working so hard, let's take a special trip to the library". I usually call in our behavior coach or someone to stand at the door and make sure the student is safe, but all attention is taken away.

It depends on the grade level you're teaching, but when I have these kiddos I have to work extra hard to "train" the rest of the class how to do the right thing. We talk about that we are all learning different things, and some of us are learning how to make good choices. If you see someone not making a good choice, then your job is to be an example and show them what a good choice looks like. I teach elementary though, so it's a little easier.
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Need more detail
Old 10-01-2017, 05:35 PM
 
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There is no one answer to this question and the teacher response is varied based on student needs. While I agree that the behavior should be ignored, you also need to look at what the classroom setting is like. We also need to look at why the student is engaged in this behavior. Additionally we need to look at the what the teacher and what other students are doing. Grade, age, and ability level all play factors as well.

Here are some questions you can answer for us to help you more.

What is the function on the behavior? (the why)
Is this student avoiding a task, wanting to get attention, the task is too or too hard?
What is the setting this student is in?
Is this in an academic classroom or is this in elective?
What grade level is the student?
Is the student on an IEP?
Is the behavior unsafe?
What is the classroom rules?
What is the teacher doing when this is going on?
What are the other students doing when this is going on?

Last edited by teachingtall; 10-01-2017 at 05:38 PM.. Reason: added words to clarify meaning.
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Young lady
Old 10-02-2017, 05:59 PM
 
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4th Grade. Knows she's being disruptive. Wants attention. Wants to get her way. Refuses to follow class rules to work. Wants to walk the hallways. Other students laugh to encourage her. She does not have an IEP yet. Problems at home.
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Old 10-03-2017, 10:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Knows she's being disruptive. Wants attention. Wants to get her way. Refuses to follow class rules to work. Wants to walk the hallways. Other students laugh to encourage her.
What incentives does she have to work? Could you create opportunities for her to move around the school? (Think about going on a time driven errand {note to the office}, walk to co-teacher to "get something") Could you create opportunities for her to get attention? (Think readers theater, partner work, teach others how to do something.)

Quote:
She does not have an IEP yet. Problems at home.
Is it only her behaviors impacting academics or is their other issues going on?


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there are these days!
Old 10-20-2017, 02:22 PM
 
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OMG. These days will drain you as you already know. Sometimes, you need to accept that they're there to cause drama. The main thing is to keep them inside the classroom and act as a bouncer to stop them from wreaking havoc in the halls and disrupt other classes. That's what they want. Just don't let them. If the guardian has a good control over their kid, I would let them know otherwise, what's the use. Try everything possible to get this kid on board short of you giving in.
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Classroom Management
Old 11-19-2017, 06:03 AM
 
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It sounds like you might need to revamp your classroom management strategies because they are not effective for this little one and you’re likely losing the rest of the group as a result.

Every child is different, but here are a few things that have worked for me.

If you have kids sitting at table groups, create a points system attached to some reward and use the power of peer pressure. For example, my table groups got points for having all their materials ready, having an organized table, quietest table, quickest to be ready for recess, etc... whatever I needed them to be more efficient at. I had an incredibly disorganized student who created a mess all the time, but his table mates became a huge help to him and modeled how to stay organized. I would then give that group a point for being helpful to a classmate.

I also used a color card system as a visual warning about behaviors. Everyone started on green, if I had to give a warning and a behavior continued I would flip to yellow. If the child turned it around, then after an hour of appropriate behavior I would flip it back to green(not too soon though, they really had to work for it). If they didn’t stop, then the red card was a loss of recess. Following that I had a blue card which meant a phone call home. Some people might feel this is punitive and not to PBIS standards, but after the first 2 weeks of school and consistent follow through on my part, I almost never had to flip beyond the yellow warning.

Using planned ignoring as a technique could work or backfire depending on this girl. In your case, it sounds like you ignoring it won’t help because she is being reinforced by her peers attention.

How about giving her jobs around your classroom that would keep her busy and might even be helpful to you? Handing out papers, floor sweeper, office messenger, coat area tidier, etc....

If she’s looking for attention then you need to find ways to give her positive attention. Catch her being good, connect her with peers or let her earn time with you, especially if her home life is bad. Build a strong relationship with her so she cares enough to behave for you. Maybe a special lunch for the two of you. Find out what motivates her and set up a checklist/points system so she can see that she can control her environment/world in a positive and productive way to get what she needs.

Good luck! Attention seeking is a tough one. Be consistent and good things will happen

Last edited by TeachNFriend; 11-19-2017 at 06:13 AM.. Reason: Added in an additional idea and fixed pronoun problem
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