Why are you mad at ME? - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Special Education

Why are you mad at ME?

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Cinderella00's Avatar
Cinderella00 Cinderella00 is offline
 
Joined: May 2011
Posts: 1,852
Senior Member

Cinderella00
 
Cinderella00's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2011
Posts: 1,852
Senior Member
Why are you mad at ME?
Old 11-10-2019, 07:25 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I'm an EBD teacher in an elementary school.
I'm frustrated because I'm dealing with other adults who are angry at ME.
My kids act up - teachers act like it's my fault. All year there hasn't been a behavior that's happened in a gen ed room, but when other adults choose to yell at my students in the hall, playground or lunchroom and send my students into meltdowns, it's my fault.

I had lots of examples, but deleted them. It just helped to get it all out.


Cinderella00 is offline   Reply With Quote

NewCAteacher NewCAteacher is offline
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 323
Full Member

NewCAteacher
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 323
Full Member
I get it
Old 11-10-2019, 09:17 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

My hubby once quit a job working with EBD because he was so tired of being blamed by Gen Ed teachers for the kids’ behaviors. Those kids receive specialized services because they have really specific needs. Outbursts and defying directions of adults are often part of their disabilities. Imagine if you had a blind student and you just told them to “try harder” to see. You wouldn’t do that, right? You’d change your approach based upon the need of the kid.

You can’t magically take away the behavior of your students. The staff needs to change their approach. That is on THEM.

A little side story: I was on yard duty the other day and a student was clearly not abiding by playground rules. Normally, consistent failure to abide by playground rules is an automatic write up. I started to write him up and he starts cussing at me and saying he’s going to kill me. Lunges at me like he’s going to hit me. An aide rushes over and pulls him away from me. That’s when I realized the kid was from the ED class. Had I known this, I would have handled the situation in a less anxiety-inducing way for him.

Last edited by NewCAteacher; 11-10-2019 at 05:06 PM..
NewCAteacher is offline   Reply With Quote
clucerorobles clucerorobles is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 35
Junior Member

clucerorobles
 
Joined: Apr 2017
Posts: 35
Junior Member

Old 12-29-2019, 05:50 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

They will never will understand until they work with the demographics we do!
clucerorobles is offline   Reply With Quote
whatever's Avatar
whatever whatever is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,284
Senior Member

whatever
 
whatever's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,284
Senior Member
Yep. I hear that too.
Old 12-30-2019, 12:54 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

And too, I often hear that they act worse with me in my room than they do in the Gen Ed rooms and common areas. If that is true, I know that it is because I am, as a teacher, and my room is their safe place where they KNOW they can fall apart without judgment.

Some of the students work super hard to keep it together for the gen ed teachers and their peers that they cannot go another minute by the time they reach my room.

Good luck to you. Know you are doing the right thing and keep on. If you do choose to change up how you handle behaviors, do it for you and the kids--not the gen ed teachers.
whatever is online now   Reply With Quote
teabreak teabreak is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,751
Senior Member

teabreak
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,751
Senior Member
Behavior
Old 12-30-2019, 01:06 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I guess my first question to the gen ed teachers is always, ďAre you following the behavior plan as itís written? What was the antecedent to this latest behavior? How many times has this happened before you contacted me? Can I see the data you collected so I can do a better job of making sure the right plans are in place.Ē They donít generally like when I ask those questions, but some of the gen ed teachers arenít really trained to deal with students like ours. They need to be reminded that one time of following the plan is not going to be effective and there will always be more behavior after something new is implemented before the behavior gets better.

One thing I did do was sit down with the teacher and come up with a compromised list of low-medium-high level behaviors. That helped a lot!


teabreak is offline   Reply With Quote
seenthelight seenthelight is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,058
Senior Member

seenthelight
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,058
Senior Member

Old 12-30-2019, 01:26 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Iím sorry, but no. Just look at the example given of lunging and threatening to kill. These kids do not belong in GenEd if they are that emotionally unstable. It is not their LRE. In this day and age, we need to stop underestimating the danger these kids can pose.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graph...-nikolas-cruz/
seenthelight is offline   Reply With Quote
teabreak teabreak is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,751
Senior Member

teabreak
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,751
Senior Member
Seenthlight
Old 12-31-2019, 09:00 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Yes, I can see the point on that for sure. I was addressing Cinderellaís post where she is getting yelled at by other teachers for student behavior. There was no mention of lunging and threatening of life in her post (that I could see. Did I miss that part?).

I work all day with kids with documented and undocumented EBD as a high school special educator. I was mentioning talking to the teachers about what would constitute a specific behavior. A student saying ďF that!Ē Would be considered low level for me if they arenít being physically aggressive. Not to say there shouldnít be consequences, but not like they should be kicked out for that word, at least at the high school level. It might be better to have a cool down time to rethink their actions. We have all been there Iím sure.

If it escalates to a high level behavior (throwing things, hitting, kicking, threats etc....) then by all means they should be held to a consequence. For each individual student itís different according to their FBA and BIP. If the BIP isnít working for a specific teacher, then a conference with the teacher is possibly needed to help them know what to do in specific situations. If the BIP isnít working for many teachers, then the BIP may need to be rewritten.

As the law stands, we canít just toss kids out without filling out a ton of paperwork as well as paperwork and justification with the Civil Liberties. Not that I think that all kids belong in a school setting, but if a child is on a BIP then they have an IEP and we have to make sure what we are doing is individualized for them.
teabreak is offline   Reply With Quote
seenthelight seenthelight is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,058
Senior Member

seenthelight
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,058
Senior Member

Old 12-31-2019, 02:47 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

I was referencing NewCAteacherís example. It is in the replies.

I also want to clarify that I am not advocating kicking anyone out of school. I am speaking of proper placement. The Parkland shooter, who I will not reference by name, was in a specialized school setting before being allowed to return to Stoneman Douglas. The article I linked references the fact that more appropriate mental health services we're available in the other placement. The Sandy Hook shooter also had a history of poor mental health and emotional disturbance.

We are failing everyone by insisting that these kids belong in GenEd. We fail them as they often grow up to find themselves entangled with the police to disastrous results with no IEP to protect them from the consequences. We fail everyone else by placing a ticking time bomb in a general education setting that is not equipped to diffuse said bomb.

I am a GenEd teacher. I signed up to teach. I did not sign up to be cursed out. I did not sign up to have things thrown at me. I did not sign up to be assaulted. I did not sign up to be a human shield between innocent children and anotherís childís anger. I could have gone to work at the school 20 minutes from my home that pays a lot more and has significantly better benefits. They are always hiring. I chose not to because the pay and benefits did not outweigh the fact that I have neither the temperament not the training to handle their population.

Now, it seems it doesn't matter. These kids are being dumped into our classrooms at alarming rates in the name of inclusion. Not only that, but it is our fault when they fall apart and incidents start occurring. Nevermind the fact that these incidents occur all over the school regardless of which adult is supervising. Nevermind that these children typically have histories pages long.

As for low-level behaviors, I politely disagree. There need to be consequences. I have seen a child learn to game the system. Heíd figured out exactly where the line was and walked it within millimeters constantly. It is draining. It is absolutely exhausting to spend your entire day walking on eggshells in order to appease one child and make sure that nothing sets him/her off. It requires a level of attention that severely impedes the learning not only of that child, but of every other child in the classrooms.

Iím sorry, but this just hits on an exposed nerve. Yes, they are children, but they are potentially very dangerous, and it needs to be taken more seriously. It is not the ED and/or SPED teachers fault by any means, but it also isnít the GenEd teachers fault. We get no training on how to manage these kids other than a few notes in an IEP and we shoulder the blame when someone gets hurt. It quickly turns into what did you do to provoke him? Did you follow the IEP? We also shoulder the blame when test scores are low. Why did your students score so low on X concept? Well, you see, Johnny was having a meltdown, so instead of doing the lesson I was busy standing in between him and everyone else until heíd calmed down enough for me to try to deescalate him.

We also get to not sleep at night knowing Johnny will seriously hurt someone. It is not a matter of if, but when, so amidst being blamed for all his behaviors we say two prayers:

1. Let him get the help he needs before he really hurts someone.
2. If he doesn't (which given the current climate/system is the more likely scenario), please don't let it be on my watch because even though I know it wouldnít be my fault, I don't know how Iíd forgive myself.
seenthelight is offline   Reply With Quote
teabreak teabreak is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,751
Senior Member

teabreak
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,751
Senior Member
I understand
Old 12-31-2019, 08:46 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

Sometimes I have to step back and look at situations through a different perspective. I can get stuck just seeing from my perspective.

I agree that children and young adults with ED need specialized instruction. I wish all districts could afford to have teachers and buildings where these needs were met and rehabilitated. I also wish that teachers and other students didn’t have to fear for their lives at the hands of those that are truly disturbed.

Since we can’t have all of that right now, the question becomes, how do we rectify this? I’m not asking for an answer, just pondering the question. It’s a sad situation that we even have to ask. I’ll be thinking on this one for sure.

Seriously though, thank you for showing me a side I knew about, but hadn’t really put serious thought to. I need to expand my personal thinking on this situation.
teabreak is offline   Reply With Quote
Lottalove's Avatar
Lottalove Lottalove is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,870
Senior Member

Lottalove
 
Lottalove's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,870
Senior Member
I don't think it is just a SpEd issue anymore
Old 01-01-2020, 09:27 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

There seem to be sooo many students with issues--from lack of respect in general to behavior, anger control or other issues--that we cannot keep up with them all.

There are kids with anger issues that will never meet the criteria for an IEP or another LRE. Entitled kids, abused kids, bullied kids and the bullies themselves are all liable to have issues within the classroom.

Yes, it sucks when they have known issues and IEPs and are not getting the support they need in the gen ed setting but I think all teachers need to be prepared for this new reality.


Lottalove is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Special Education
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:44 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net