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What do you do with constant talk?

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MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
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What do you do with constant talk?
Old 02-13-2020, 10:26 AM
 
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I have one student who talks non-stop. He keeps up a steady stream of comments about his work while we are doing independent work.
Ex: "My brain is mush. Ugggghhhhhh. This is stupid! I didn't push that button! I wasn't paying attention. I was thinking. You're stupid" It is literally, and I am using that word correctly, literally non-stop. It's maddening. If he's not talking, he making frustrated noises, moaning, and growling.
He also blurts out constantly.

I ask him to stop because he is disrupting the classroom, and he responds, "FINE! I'll never talk again!"

Any suggestions?


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ConnieWI ConnieWI is offline
 
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Move His Desk
Old 02-13-2020, 10:36 AM
 
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Move his desk to a corner so his back is to the wall. Then place a cardboard study carrel on his desktop. He will be sitting behind the carrel and not disturbing the class as much. You might also want to post expectations for him on the inside of the carrel so he can be constantly reminded.

When he can control himself, he may rejoin the large group.
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Old 02-13-2020, 10:54 AM
 
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Put a small chart on his desk. Every time you hear that behavior put a check on the chart. Do not talk or make a verbal comment to him, just check silently. Hopefully it will make him aware of how often this is occurring. Or you can do the opposite and put a star on the paper every time heís working quietly. Keep track of the numbers. Agree on a reward if he reaches a certain amount. Simple reward like free time on the iPad, choosing recess equipment first, etc.
I believe that itís important to not verbally engage with him because that just encourages a response.
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Old 02-14-2020, 04:37 AM
 
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For some it is the same as fidgeting but words instead. Some it is a release for anxiety or frustration.

I agree with sitting aside or asking him to speak more quietly when he talks to himself.

It sounds to me that it is almost unconscious to him and when you call him out on it he is even more frustrated and responds to the extreme.

So, how long does he stop for after you call him out? A minute, two?
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Old 02-14-2020, 05:04 PM
 
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Is gum-chewing allowed in your school? It might keep his mouth too busy to talk.


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Old 02-15-2020, 01:18 PM
 
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I was going to suggest gum as well. Not my favorite solution but certainly better than non-stop dialogue!
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Old 02-16-2020, 01:57 AM
 
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I give my students a self monitor checklist. They might have different goals. I have a few students who blurt out as well. We set a goal. If the blurt , they need to tally. If they go over the goal, then the sheet has to go home and be signed. This has helped with most of my students.
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Old 02-16-2020, 03:57 AM
 
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I agree with other posters about separating him and chewing gum!
But one thing that struck me (because we recently had a student tested), could it be a form of Tourette's? Check with his previous teachers. Ours did the moaning and groaning any time he was frustrated or inattentive.
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Talking
Old 02-16-2020, 10:17 AM
 
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If you can't use gum, maybe hard candy to suck on would help. That sometimes gives them enough oral stimulation that they are doing something else rather than talking. It sounds like he is not just talking to give negative comments, it might be coming from something a little more. The other thing to check on is whether he does this talking at unstructured activities or at home. Maybe it is only during quiet independent time and he needs to be retaught about the rules during independent work time.
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