Catholic Schools Closing - ProTeacher Community




      
Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Teachers' Lounge


Catholic Schools Closing

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
letsgomets's Avatar
letsgomets letsgomets is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,646
Senior Member

letsgomets
 
letsgomets's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,646
Senior Member
Catholic Schools Closing
Old 07-10-2020, 10:20 AM
  #1

I wasn't sure where to put this because it's not really a teaching topic.

Last night, I found out that the Archdiocese of New York announced yesterday that they are closing 20 schools and merging several more in response to losing money due to COVID-19. My school closed 9 years ago and one of my good friends went to teach at another school in the Archdiocese.

They found out yesterday, when this was announced. No prior notice, nothing. I feel terrible that she has to go through this again. She's a widow, and I think needs to work until her retirement age for Social Security.

I can't believe how poorly they treat the teachers there.


letsgomets is offline   Reply With Quote

Teacherbee_4 Teacherbee_4 is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 7,952
Senior Member

Teacherbee_4
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 7,952
Senior Member
Common
Old 07-10-2020, 10:31 AM
  #2

I feel sorry for your friend. However, unfortunately, in recent times, even before COVID, Catholic Schools have had too close. I know in our diocese if a Catholic School closes, teachers from that school get first preference/consideration for open jobs at other schools in diocese.

I don't know anything about how the Archdiocese of New York/your friend's school treats their employees, and I'm sure you know this, but to just to clarify for everyone else, not all Catholic Schools treat their employees poorly. The last two I've worked in have treated their employees exceptional, much better than when I was in public school. It really has more to do with the leaders/people in charge than the type of school, in my opinion.
Teacherbee_4 is online now   Reply With Quote
teachnkids's Avatar
teachnkids teachnkids is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 25,600
Senior Member

teachnkids
 
teachnkids's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 25,600
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 10:36 AM
  #3

I know of a Catholic school in NJ that has hired 6 new staff due to Corona regulations!
teachnkids is offline   Reply With Quote
NJ Teacher's Avatar
NJ Teacher NJ Teacher is online now
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 8,660
Senior Member

NJ Teacher
 
NJ Teacher's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 8,660
Senior Member
Closed schools
Old 07-10-2020, 10:48 AM
  #4

I live in the NY border in NJ. A Catholic school in Suffern has closed along with others in NYC and Westchester. I feel for the students and staff. My friend in western NY has gone through this. When her parochial school closed, she was fortunate to find another parochial school job. She is single and needs the income. She reLly sweated it out there for awhile.
NJ Teacher is online now   Reply With Quote
Englishish's Avatar
Englishish Englishish is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 116
Full Member

Englishish
 
Englishish's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 116
Full Member

Old 07-10-2020, 10:49 AM
  #5

Thatís such a shame! Iíll be praying for your friend. This is definitely not representative of how all Catholic school teachers are treated.


Englishish is offline   Reply With Quote
amiga13's Avatar
amiga13 amiga13 is online now
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 19,916
Senior Member

amiga13
 
amiga13's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 19,916
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 10:54 AM
  #6

I’m sad for your friend. I worked in a Catholic school (and I’m not even Catholic) for 3 years and loved it. I liked everything about it, colleagues students parents organization respect, except the salary/retirement. Where I live, public schools pay a lot more and have a strong pension plan and Catholic schools had neither.
amiga13 is online now   Reply With Quote
Tori58 Tori58 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,038
Senior Member

Tori58
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,038
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 11:22 AM
  #7

Quote:
It really has more to do with the leaders/people in charge than the type of school, in my opinion.
This. It is true that, in states with good teacher unions, public school teachers are definitely going to get paid more and have better benefits. In general, though, I've been treated more fairly teaching in a Catholic School than I was for the last 10 years that I taught in public school.

When it comes to closing schools suddenly, I think that could happen in any Catholic school regardless of leadership. Catholic schools rely on funds coming in from Mass as well as tuition to stay afloat. If suddenly people can't afford to pay tuition and offerings are low because people can't come to Mass, what are they supposed to do? My school recently went through the certification process to become approved for school choice students and they run a really good 3K and 4K program. I think those two things have made a significant difference in the amount of funding we see.
Tori58 is offline   Reply With Quote
sbslab's Avatar
sbslab sbslab is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,974
Senior Member

sbslab
 
sbslab's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,974
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 11:49 AM
  #8

This is happening in SE Mass, too! We lost one neighboring school suddenly two years ago. This year, another announced in January they would close. Two HS announced this is their last year while out for Covid.

Then, right at the end of the year, another fairly local school decided to close. In addition, the two closest to us changed direction. Not merging, but one would do pre-school to 4th, the other 5-8. They are at the opposite ends of the same spread out town. I think this will be a nightmare for parents to do drop off and pick up at two different schools.

Iím blessed that we are still open. The two closest to us had two of each grade when I started at my school. I always thought weíd be first to close.
sbslab is offline   Reply With Quote
letsgomets's Avatar
letsgomets letsgomets is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,646
Senior Member

letsgomets
 
letsgomets's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,646
Senior Member
I taught
Old 07-10-2020, 11:49 AM
  #9

for the Archdiocese of New York for over 20 years. When they went through the first round of closings, 9 years ago, your time in the Archdiocese didn't count - only the time you were tenured. Part time teachers didn't get tenure, so many of the years I worked there did not count when remaining schools were instructed to hire teachers who had lost their jobs. I had been part time for a number of years, so although I had been with the Archdiocese for 24 years, they only counted about 13 of those years. There were 28 schools that were closed, and I believe there were at least 300 teachers looking for new positions. My friend was lucky to get the position she got. We knew then about 6 months out that our school was closing.

Two years later, they closed another round of schools (about 20 that time, I think). That time, they counted your seniority from date of hire. They also gave teachers notice that spring. Two different rehire scenarios.

The Archdiocese could have let the teachers know that their school was in danger at least at the beginning of June. They told them yesterday. The Archdiocese of New York owns lots and lots of property in New York city and in the Hudson Valley and have never let go of any assets to save any schools.

The school my friend works at is well run. Another school that is being consolidated is in a parish where my old pastor is in charge, so he is going through all of this again as well. I know these schools were run well. This obviously was not a consideration here.

I have worked for 1 other Archdiocese, and now work for an independent Catholic school run by a religious order. These two organizations have given better support to the schools than the Archdiocese of New York ever did.

Last edited by letsgomets; 07-10-2020 at 12:32 PM..
letsgomets is offline   Reply With Quote
jazzer jazzer is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,523
Senior Member

jazzer
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,523
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 11:56 AM
  #10

I spent most of my career teaching in private schools, Catholic, Lutheran, Christian, and Montessori. I was a traveling teacher for many years and have taught at a total of 30 different schools throughout my career.

There are a few small ones that I used to teach at that have now closed. There were a couple that merged with other schools as well. One that closed was actually a Christian school.

Another issue causing Catholic Schools to Close is lack of funding due to all of the molestations by priests which occurred starting about 18 years ago. I think the Catholic Church had a great deal of money before that started to happen.


jazzer is offline   Reply With Quote
Tori58 Tori58 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,038
Senior Member

Tori58
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 1,038
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 12:10 PM
  #11

Quote:
Another issue causing Catholic Schools to Close is lack of funding due to all of the molestations by priests which occurred starting about 18 years ago. I think the Catholic Church had a great deal of money before that started to happen.
Yes, I'm sure this didn't help at all. However, where I'm at, the Diocese actually does a better job of educating teachers (and everyone else who has contact with children) about how to spot signs of abuse and potential abusers than the public schools did where I worked. If you are in a diocese that participates in the VIRTUS program, you have to take training and periodic refresher training in this AND you have contact information for reporting suspected abuse if your parish seems inclined to sweep it under the rug. This isn't just for teachers: all volunteers, janitors, cooks, coaches, camp counselors, etc. must take it. Whereas, in my years in a public school, I twice tried to report suspected abuse and was told both times, "But you don't have any proof so we can't do anything."
Tori58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 8,061
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 8,061
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 12:33 PM
  #12

My mom worked at a Christian school and they eventually closed after struggling with money for many, many years. She was incredibly happy there but her salary was peanuts.

My dad currently works at a Catholic school as his "retirement job." He's been very happy there as well as the job and feels that the job is significantly easier and less stressful than public schools. He's also not paid that well, but it's on top of his pension from the public school system so it's fine.

Their enrollment hasn't really dropped at this point, but they are concerned that parents won't want to stay if schools end up going online again. At this point everyone says they're opening, but the numbers look very bad especially in that county. One thing they'd talked about at his school is doing way more synchronous teaching so that even though it's online, they have an edge over the public schools who are doing more asynchronous stuff. However, I know in my public district (different state) they're talking about wanting it to be much more synchronous during periods of online learning this year.
Haley23 is online now   Reply With Quote
jazzer jazzer is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,523
Senior Member

jazzer
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,523
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 12:46 PM
  #13

Tori, yes that is true about the training. As a direct employee and as an outside service contractor visiting the schools, I was required to take that training as well. I did it twice. A second time when records of the first time did not show up for some reason.
jazzer is offline   Reply With Quote
sonoma's Avatar
sonoma sonoma is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,379
Senior Member

sonoma
 
sonoma's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,379
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 02:25 PM
  #14

I am surprised that our catholic school has not closed. When my dd went there they had 1200 students. Last year the enrollment was down to 680.

They have not lowered the required entrance test score. And they raised their tuition from $9000 last year to $10,500 for 2020/21.

I know a lot of private schools in the area charge more but I think that crossing the $10,000 threshold creates a roadblock for many prospective parents.
sonoma is offline   Reply With Quote
amiga13's Avatar
amiga13 amiga13 is online now
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 19,916
Senior Member

amiga13
 
amiga13's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 19,916
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 08:08 PM
  #15

There was a segment on the news tonight about the Catholic churchís financial problems. In addition to the problems cited above, they said a lot of money had gone to substance abuse programs for priests.
amiga13 is online now   Reply With Quote
TeacherPK6's Avatar
TeacherPK6 TeacherPK6 is online now
 
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 3,958
Senior Member

TeacherPK6
 
TeacherPK6's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 3,958
Senior Member

Old 07-10-2020, 08:27 PM
  #16

I'm sorry your friend is being treated so poorly.
TeacherPK6 is online now   Reply With Quote
chipmunky chipmunky is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,914
Senior Member

chipmunky
 
Joined: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,914
Senior Member
It may be the COVID 19
Old 07-11-2020, 06:51 AM
  #17

that caused the closing of that school, but I saw a lot of Catholic schools closing over the past years for other reasons.
One reason was that the area where they were located just didn't have as many dedicated Catholic families. It became more diverse and the families that were Catholic just weren't as active in the church.
Another reason was that the local public schools became better, with higher rankings and offered a lot more choices of subjects to students and families who would have sent their children to Catholic school chose to send them to public school.
Also, some families could not afford the tuition when they could be educated for free.
The Catholic School where I grew up closed a few years ago because they could no longer afford to keep it open. Less people giving to the church was one of the reason, also the school had all nuns teaching when I was a kid. Now there are very few if any nuns teaching or being the principal and the church has to pay salaries.
I am sure each school has their own set of reasons.

I do doubt that it is just because of COVID 19 because the Catholic Church just got 1.4 Billion in PPP loans from our government.
chipmunky is offline   Reply With Quote
letsgomets's Avatar
letsgomets letsgomets is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,646
Senior Member

letsgomets
 
letsgomets's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,646
Senior Member
I'd love to know
Old 07-11-2020, 09:24 AM
  #18

how they are using this. It isn't to save schools.
Quote:
I do doubt that it is just because of COVID 19 because the Catholic Church just got 1.4 Billion in PPP loans from our government.
Archbishop Dolan said in an interview on TV that these were not underperforming schools - they were A+ schools but lacked enrollment registration.
letsgomets is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Teachers' Lounge
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:09 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net
17