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Reopening?
Old 07-12-2020, 07:23 PM
  #1

Our district announced it's reopening plan a couple of days ago. If the COVID-19 situation stays as is, we will be teaching 4 days a week of face to face with Fridays as a remote learning day.

After reading about the teacher in Arizona who died, and all the other things going on, I am NOT comfortable with this in the least. I need to get in 2-3 more years before I can retire and I'm worried. I'm considered high risk as it is, and I feel as though NO ONE is listening to the staff members! I'm frustrated.


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Old 07-12-2020, 07:45 PM
  #2

I don't understand why we closed everything down in March and went 100% distance learning and now when the numbers are HIGHER than they were in March, we're all suddenly expected to go back. Have people just accepted that there is a certain amount of death they are comfortable with?

And I completely reject the "we're testing that's why our numbers are so high" idiocy. The positivity percentage in my county used to be at 2% (in May). Now it's 10%.

Shouldn't that warrant another shut down??
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Old 07-12-2020, 07:51 PM
  #3

Iím right there with you! Iím healthy (so far) so Iím able to return to the classroom. Just not sure I want to.

Part of being on the fence has been waiting to find out the districtís plan. Itís hard to make decisions in the absence of information!

Like you, I had not planned on retiring yet. It will be a struggle financially if I retire early. However, Iím very close to pulling the plug. My district requires 60 days notice, and I would feel about abandoning my coworkers. But the alternative could be very, very dire.

I keep see-sawing. Part of me thinks ďwait and see how things go,Ē while the other part thinks I will regret going forward.
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Old 07-12-2020, 08:24 PM
  #4

Yes, it should warrant another shut down.

I don't get the push to go back to school with numbers going up. I think that people are being conditioned to accept these numbers and the deaths. 1% of our population dying is over 3 million people. Let that sink in.
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Risking lives
Old 07-12-2020, 09:19 PM
  #5

This is from a post (A long read) by ConnieWI on the Busy Board
http://www.proteacher.net/discussion...d.php?t=637697

A parent reacting to comments he had read:
“Children only die .0016 of the time.”
First, conceding we’re an increasingly morally bankrupt society, but when did we start talking about children’s lives, or anyone’s lives, like this? This how the villain in movies talks about mortality, usually 10-15 minutes before the good guy kills him.

If you’re in this camp, and I acknowledge that many, many people are, I’m asking you to consider that number from a slightly different angle.

FCPS has 189,000 children. .0016 of that is 302. 302 dead children are the Calvary Hill you’re erecting your argument on. So, let’s agree to do this: stop presenting this as a data point. If this is your argument, I challenge you to have courage equal to your conviction. Go ahead, plant a flag on the internet and say, “Only 302 children will die.” No one will. That’s the kind action on social media that gets you fired from your job. And I trust our social media enclave isn’t so careless and irresponsible with life that it would even, for even a millisecond, enter any of your minds to make such an argument.

Considered another way: You’re presented with a bag with 189,000 $1 bills. You’re told that in the bag are 302 random bills, they look and feel just like all the others, but each one of those bills will kill you. Do you take the money out of the bag?

Same argument, applied to the 12,487 teachers in FCPS (per Wikipedia), using the ‘children’s multiplier’ of .0016 (all of us understanding the adult mortality rate is higher). That’s 20 teachers. That’s the number you’re talking about. It’s very easy to sit behind a keyboard and diminish and dismiss the risk you’re advocating other people assume. Take a breath and think about that.”


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Old 07-12-2020, 09:48 PM
  #6

Connie WI is very respected!
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Old 07-13-2020, 02:05 AM
  #7

I briefly listened to a commentator on FOX yesterday. His solution was that concerned parents could pull their children out of public schools and enroll them in charter, private or parochial schools. It's all about giving parents the right to choose since the public schools are failing our children anyway.

As I said, I briefly listened before I couldn't take anymore.
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Old 07-13-2020, 03:28 AM
  #8

Quote:
I briefly listened to a commentator on FOX yesterday. His solution was that concerned parents could pull their children out of public schools and enroll them in charter, private or parochial schools. It's all about giving parents the right to choose since the public schools are failing our children anyway.
Great solution. The virus only attacks public school children. Oh wait! It can attack every child no matter which school is attended. I sometimes wonder if some commentators actually listen to what comes out their mouth.
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Old 07-13-2020, 05:49 AM
  #9

There are many districts opening with higher case numbers than when they closed. This graph really hits home regarding the logic of reopening Seminole County schools. "Source: Those are case numbers for Seminole County, Florida (north suburban Orlando) on Friday from our county's dashboard. To get the large image, you have to double click on the "expand" icon on the top right of the frame at bottom center left. Link: http://seminolegis.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/b2c25af87b9e460281ab0f160129d6a b"
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Agreed!
Old 07-13-2020, 06:10 AM
  #10

We have an optional meeting online this morning to go over the planned changes for next school year. I'm curious as to what those will be. I'm also shocked that people around here/at our school are "certain" we will be back. I really feel for those who are older, in a higher risk category, or have family members in a higher risk category who have to go back. I know the AAP says that we should go back, but I feel that's just looking at the best interest of the children and the best interest of EVERYONE/society as a whole...and this is coming from someone who does not fear getting sick in the least. I honestly don't think it's a good idea to go back...and when we first shut down in March, I was shocked and thought it was silly. Please don't flame me for that, but I did, considering the state our area was in. Now, we are MUCH MUCH worse than we were back then, yet we are planning to go back. Go figure.


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This has changed
Old 07-13-2020, 08:04 AM
  #11

Quote:
I know the AAP says that we should go back,
They have changed their position and now say that a one size fits all approach isn't appropriate with the current rise in cases in some areas.
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Old 07-13-2020, 09:14 AM
  #12

My district has provided information for the return to school. All districts in Texas can offer a choice to parents: on-line (remote) learning or on campus. All teachers will be required to teach from on campus. I agree with whoever mentioned that it has to be a local decision and not a one-size-fits all. We have counties in Texas with 0 cases at all. And some counties that have cases, but other parts of the county have had some cases, but all are recovered so no current cases.

The plan for my district is to have designated on-line teachers who will have a combination of students from various campuses. Students, I think it is age 10 and up will be required to wear a mask or a face shield. We will have smaller class sizes, if it is a class on campus. Lots of cleaning will be happening too. Plexiglas at the teacher desk and same for those elementary areas where the teacher meets with a small group.

I'm wondering if the district will make clear plastic separation dividers for the science classrooms as we sit at lab tables. I have a feeling we will be doing lots of virtual labs or if we do hands-on, much will be consumable and thrown away after each class.
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Old 07-13-2020, 09:51 AM
  #13

Allowing this to be "local decisions" and not "one size fits all" is what got us into this mess, frankly. I understand that some areas still have very few cases, but unless you can guarantee (by closing borders) that no one travels to or from that area, then you just don't have cases yet.

I recall that Georgia's justification for reopening early was that they didn't have the caseloads that NY had. Well, look at them now.

Not having a central, cohesive plan that everyone agrees to follow is causing mayhem. People don't believe the science, because they have 20 different people in charge, all telling them something different.

There is no way for us to go back safely. Our infection rate is too high -- and that goes for most of this country. I just got an e-mail from my P telling us how to set up classrooms for social distancing. Clearly we are going back. Our infection rate over the weekend was 10%.

This is madness.
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Old 07-13-2020, 01:53 PM
  #14

Quote:
Allowing this to be "local decisions" and not "one size fits all" is what got us into this mess, frankly. I understand that some areas still have very few cases, but unless you can guarantee (by closing borders) that no one travels to or from that area, then you just don't have cases yet.
Izzy, we will have to agree to disagree on the above topic.
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Old 07-13-2020, 02:02 PM
  #15

Our state declared several weeks ago that schools would open with 50% using a hybrid model. Our numbers are going up though and the governor reclosed restaurants, so as long as that is in effect, I donít see us bringing kids into schools. Just got an email from the union saying if you begin planning during the summer you should focus on remote learning.
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School
Old 07-13-2020, 03:00 PM
  #16

We are doing the hybrid a/b model with groups on Monday/Wednesday and Tuesday/Thursday with rotating Fridays. Also, parents may chose to the all online option. So we are expecting 12-15 per class per day. We have to assign work through google classroom the days the kids arenít present at school, as well as work for the kids doing exclusively online. I have no idea how we will do it all. Also, thereís a list of rules to follow: temp checks, staggered class exchange, staggered lunch, cleaning, hand washing time, social distancing, etc. Supposedly, they fully expect us to be all online in a couple of months with the rising cases. So whatís the point? Itís such a mess.
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