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RTIisfun RTIisfun is offline
 
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RTIisfun
 
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Phonics - help!
Old 04-04-2013, 05:22 AM
 
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I am tutoring a second grader in reading, and she is in need of phonics help. She can read words, phrases, and sentences fairly well, but can not rhyme or recognize consonant blends well at all. She also has trouble with certain digraphs. Any suggestions on things that have worked for you??


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bubbleepink bubbleepink is offline
 
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Dr. Seuss for rhyming
Old 04-05-2013, 01:25 PM
 
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Try reading Dr. Seuss books with her. They usually rhyme (fox in sox especially) then find some activities to do with the books (teachers pay teachers has a lot of free centers). Also, you can try the Florida reading institute (http://www.fcrr.org) has centers that you can print and play with her. Check the grade 2/3 centers as well as the k/1 centers. I have found these helpful in teaching my grade 1's and grade 3's. Each grade set is divided into 5 sections so searching is relatively simple. Good luck! PM me if you have more questions!

BP
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maryteach maryteach is offline
 
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I'm confused
Old 04-06-2013, 08:52 PM
 
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If she's reading words, phrases, and sentences fairly well, it would indeed seem that she's able to read/decode rhyme and digraphs.

Do you mean she's unable to do these things in isolation, like reading from a list or in fluency drills? Unable to complete worksheets?

I'm just confused, because on one hand it sounds like she's reading, which would indicate a certain ability to use these things (depending, I guess, on what she's reading), but on the other hand it sounds like she has trouble reading.

Can you elaborate?
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RTIisfun RTIisfun is offline
 
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Thanks!
Old 04-09-2013, 04:38 PM
 
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I have used Dr. Seuss books with her, and we are currently reading both Fox in Socks and Hop on Pop. She is doing better with reading those, but still stumbles a bit identifying the rhyming words. She does better identifying them than creating her own.

I LOVE both of the websites you suggested. I have used many ideas found on TeachersPayTeachers, fcrr, and Pinterest with some of my other students.
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RTIisfun RTIisfun is offline
 
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Elaboration
Old 04-09-2013, 04:41 PM
 
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It is quite confusing to me, too! She has really improved in her fluency and overall reading skills, but onsets, rimes, rhymes, and digraphs are still tricky for her. She can comprehend most of what she reads if it's in a story, but not when it's in isolation. I have noticed that her spelling is still inventive, but she often interchanges the letters for certain sounds. For example, she will often spell short as shrot and girl as gril, but reads them correctly.


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maryteach maryteach is offline
 
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I agree with Dr. Seuss
Old 04-09-2013, 07:15 PM
 
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Wonderful resource. Dr. Seuss has taught many a kid to read.

If she's reading okay in context, I personally wouldn't worry too much about not being able to do it isolation. If you think about it, skills in isolation is a skill you never use anywhere but in school. In life, no one is ever going to hand her a list of nonsense syllables and ask her to read them, then fire her if she can't. If she's reading these things in context, then she's okay. In context is what counts.

I said I was confused because I didn't know what you meant. Now that you've clarified (thanks!) I'm not confused at all. Many kids can't do in isolation what they can do in context. Testing a context skill in isolation is a terrible, terrible gauge of a child's reading ability. Only what they can do while actually READING tells us anything. Now, to sit down with a child and listen to them actually read will tell us lots about what they can and cannot do. To hand them a list of syllables or even a list of words tells us actually very little. This is not confusing at all. We've known this for years and years and years.

I'm not suggesting that YOU think this is a great test or that you have anything to say, even, about whether or not this is used. I understand that these things are mandated by administrators who don't understand the first thing about teaching reading but understand everything about making you and your kids waste your time on stuff like this. I understand this and I'm not getting on you, okay? I'm just saying don't even worry about it if the kid can't read this stuff in isolation, so long as she is reading actual text well. Sit down next to her and have her read first a paragraph or page that she's ALREADY read, next a cold reading of a page or paragraph. Just listen. Can she read a grade level text okay or is she struggling? If she's struggling, don't use a word list to diagnose the problem. JUST LISTEN. What you hear will tell you everything. If she struggles, is it with blends and digraphs or is it with blowing off punctuation, especially end punctuation (one of the most common problems of struggling readers)?

So, diagnose what's really going on first, and do it in context, with actual text. Once you truly identify the problem(s), if a problem indeed actually exists, only then do you start thinking about remediation, how that will look, and what specifically is needed.

One last thing--her spelling issues are developmental and are entirely predictable for her age and probable level. These things aren't indicative of a problem, necessarily. Her spelling issues really don't tell us much about her reading skills; in fact, spelling issues really tell us nothing of value about that.
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Old 04-27-2013, 08:21 AM
 
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I had a a student that had some of the same issues. Our reading recovery people had an open slot to work with her. She had been relying on skills that somehow were not allowing her to look at words, see patterns, and apply them to the words she sees while reading. They had to go back and reteach the basics and break some of her well established reading habits. Talk to a reading recovery person in your district.
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miketeacher miketeacher is offline
 
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Old 04-30-2013, 04:12 PM
 
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Try out Fundations type activities
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