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*suggestions wanted*
Old 09-24-2010, 04:02 PM
 
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I really had a bad day today. My co teacher broke down in tears and I couldn't blame her at all. I wanted to do the same thing but was taught you shouldn't cry in front of the kids. I am getting so annoyed with the behavior in my classroom. There is absolutely no respect on the kids behalf. They simply don't listen. Some of them need consistant redirects. I even had some snap back at me and had toys thrown at me along with a few kicks ( one almost hit my bum ankle that I broke last year) We are trying to be so firm with this guys but nothing seems to be working. What works for you get them to listen to you and not snap back at you? What discipline strageties do you that make it smoother in your classroom? I am so frustrated it makes me want to leave but I love the other ones that don't give me a hard time. Naptime has been tough too. I am losing my wits and will try anything. Thanks


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Thinking of you...
Old 09-24-2010, 05:40 PM
 
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I am so sorry! I don't have any suggestions for you! I have a private preschool so I would kick them out!

I would definitely be talking to their parents. Would that help? Or does the apple not fall far from the tree?

Praise! Praise! Praise the ones that are behaving the way they are suppose to and completely ignore (I'm sure this is sooooo hard---I probably wouldn't be able to do it!) the ones who are not.

Best of luck to you!
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Old 09-24-2010, 05:54 PM
 
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I teach my little ones ways they can work through their frustrations: standing on one foot - takes the mind off of what is causing them to get upset; pretend to beat on a drum - enables them to "punch" out their feeling; balloon - pretend to blow up a balloon and then deflate it making a funny noise; to sit in "their special spot" - this is a spot they pick away from all other children.
There have been times when I tell them "Okay, Mrs. M is getting flustered. I need to "balloon" before I a lose my patience." That way I model that I get the same feelings they do and that I have to calm myself. It truely has helped me make it through some rough days.
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Old 09-24-2010, 05:57 PM
 
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sorry to hear this is happening to you...years like this are so difficult and seem to last forever...unfortunately, we can only do so much...if the children get to behave this way at home, lots of times it transfers over to the classroom...

I have been constantly been reiterating good behavior, giving lots of thumbs up's for good behavior, making them practice certain things (walking to the rug and sitting down), talking about what good listeners do, etc...

I had a kid who was saying shut up, and we told him right from the start that that language is not to be used in our class...I told him that when I want him to be quiet I will never tell him to shut up, so he does not have the right to say it to any of his friends. I haven't heard it sense, so let's see...

just keep going, and treat every day like it's the first until they get it. My kindergartners last year were like that, and I told them that if nothing else, they would learn how to listen in my classroom...it took awhile, but you bet that by June, no one was getting up running around, throwing things or anything like that...they did learn to sit nice on the rug, and a few other things...I put my blood, sweat, and tears into that class, and it took them an entire school year to learn. So hang in there!
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Old 09-24-2010, 05:59 PM
 
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awesome idea...I'm going to try it!


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Old 09-25-2010, 07:45 AM
 
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You're probably already doing this, but I "close" any problem centers. Yesterday was the first time anyone ever threw a toy car. I immediately had the kids put the cars into the tub and told them they were closed for the rest of the day. We will try again another day. I also did that with the housekeeping center one day. Haven't had to do it again since.

I am going to try the standing on one foot one next week!
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Daily behavior charts
Old 09-25-2010, 10:15 AM
 
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I teach prek and my last year's morning class was like yours is this year. A kindergarten teacher friend of mine sends home a weekly behavior checklist to every student in her room to let parents know how their child is behaving. She said it really makes a difference. This year, I decided to try that right from the start on a daily basis with the children that seemed to have the most difficulty being in the preschool setting. I started it with 6 children and I now only have to do the daily chart with two children. It gives the parents an specific idea of what my expectations for their little ones are.
The same kindergarten teacher who gave me this idea now has many of the students who were most troubling to me last year in her room. She is struggling with them too. So just try to remember that some classes are like this. Try not to take it personally. Do the best you can.
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Lights out, calming music
Old 09-25-2010, 05:25 PM
 
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Your class this year sounds like my class last year. I didn't think I was going to make it through. Now I see them walking throught the hall all in a line in kindergarten and I know progress has been made! Hang in there. A few things I find helpful when the control is slipping is I will start engaging in the centers more closely-meaning I get right down on the floor and start playing and I have my aide do the same. When the children see me playing they usually want to join in the play. In the beginning of the year I find they normally do not know how to engage with their peers so I have to model how to play-it takes a while for them to get the hang of it. If play continues to be to rough I will either limit the number of centers or bring the children to circle time and play some calming music with the lights out. When I do this I usually have the children close their eyes-it has a wonderful soothing effect on everyone in the room...children and adults. Good luck
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Try this...
Old 09-25-2010, 08:54 PM
 
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This is a tip from Marlyn Applebaum of Applebaum Institute. I get a message of the day from her everyday. She has good ideas. I haven't tried this one yet, but I plan on trying it this coming week. http://www.atiseminars.org/en/cms/?856


Use power pauses for power struggles.

When you are talking to kids, and you want them to really listen, take frequent power pauses. Take your first power pause by halting the conversation. Set an appointment to talk to the child later.

Take your next power pause when you are talking to the child. Make sure your voice gets lower and deeper as you speak. It works.

"James (power pause), I need (power pause) you (power pause) to stop (power pause) now."
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Thanks, Suzy Q
Old 09-26-2010, 01:52 PM
 
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Thank you. I'm going to try this.


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Behavior
Old 10-01-2010, 09:42 AM
 
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I have the same class this year. We have been in school for 6 weeks and I am still struggling to get control. This is my 7th year of teaching but the 1st in PreK.
They have been absolutely horrible.
I split my kids into groups and my aide takes half outside and I work with half through circle activities and centers. We switch and I repeat the same thing. Then it is lunchtime and nap. After nap is math and science and snack. I am going to try to split them up for math and science and see how that goes.
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Early Childhood Education (Pre-K)
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